Friday night topic: It’s Wubi time!

The Friday night topic has been on a bit of an unplanned hiatus lately because, let’s face it, the FNT had been working too much and needed a little bit of "me time" to recharge its batteries and regain its composure. The FNT is sure you understand.

Anyhow, the FNT is back tonight, and it has a bit of homework to assign. Your mission is to grab Wubi—it costs nothing and is just an 8MB download—and install it on your PC. The Wubi installation wizard will run, ask you a few questions, and then download everything else it needs to—install Ubuntu 8.04 on your system. Only 5GB of hard disk space and 256MB of memory is required, and Wubi is compatible with Windows 98, 2000, XP, and Vista. When the installation is complete, you’ll be able to dual-boot into Ubuntu at will. If you don’t like it, you can just remove Wubi and Ubuntu via Add/Remove Programs in the Windows control panel, and it’s gone.

It doesn’t get any slicker than this, folks.

And the question of the evening is: Has desktop Linux finally reached a tipping point? Ubuntu is pretty darned good, and it comes with a host of fairly impressive free software applications, including Firefox, Pidgin, OpenOffice.org, and a Terminal Services/Remote Desktop client. I used Wubi to install Ubuntu on my laptop because I pretty much use it as a Remote Desktop client 98% of the time. Might be a good place to start with it, if you have a laptop.

I may share more of my own impressions of Ubuntu 8.04 in the comments, but I’d like to hear what you think, especially if you’ve not tried desktop Linux in the past few years.

Comments closed
    • anlashok
    • 12 years ago

    I installed it when it came out, and it went smoothly. everything works, but for some reason it won’t connect to my belkin pre-n router. it connects fine to other networks. tried submitting my router login using the WEP encryption w/ default and explicitly w/ TKIP(the default) but just doesn’t want to connect. anyone else have issues w/ encrypted login?

    • FireGryphon
    • 12 years ago

    When I booted to Linux the first time and it did its initial install routine, my system froze*. When I restarted, it said the installation was corrupted. I had to start over. The second install went well.

    I’ve been playing around with Linux for years, but Ubuntu is the first one to be user friendly and have good documentation; I can figure things out without resorting to hours of searching documentation like I had to do with Debian, for example.

    Ubuntu’s Live CD sucked because installing things like browser plugins (SWF) didn’t work right. The Wubi installation has no such issues.

    My only lingering complaint is that GIMP is a POS compared to Photoshop.

    • fpsduck
    • 12 years ago

    I just downloaded the .ISO file
    But not installed yet.

    • kccboy2004
    • 12 years ago

    I installed, booted, all I got was a command prompt ??

      • bthylafh
      • 12 years ago

      Maybe it can’t detect your video chip or doesn’t have the correct driver. What video chip do you have?

      • Dirge
      • 12 years ago

      That sounds like a slogan for a t-shirt lol

        • SpikeMeister
        • 12 years ago

        Maybe you downloaded the server version of Ubuntu by mistake?

    • just brew it!
    • 12 years ago

    Interesting that Ubuntu 8.04 installs Firefox 3 beta by default instead of Firefox 2. I wonder if the advantages outweigh the disadvantages…? Guess I’ll get to find out next week. Hopefully my portable repository will let me downgrade if necessary!

      • Dirge
      • 12 years ago

      The Beta 5 seems pretty stable and yes I think you will enjoy it compared to version 2.

        • SpikeMeister
        • 12 years ago

        The only thing is that Google Browser Sync doesn’t work with it, had to switch to the Foxmarks Beta.

      • matic
      • 12 years ago

      Ubuntu 8.04 is a Long Term Support edition, it will receive update until 2011 (desktop edition). By that time Firefox 2 will be long time dead and it makes much more sense to support Firefox 3 by now even if in its infancy.

      I used Wubi with Ubuntu and Xubuntu 7.10 and couldn’t be much happier with it. I hate having my disk split in more than few partitions. What ruined our relationship was the upgrade from Xubuntu 7.10 to 8.04: the fake partitions were no more accessible and all I got was a command prompt. Probably nothing not solvable by browsing or invest some time but I’ve seen that Linux is suitable for my computing experience and made a real install of Xubuntu 8.04. Compared to the use with Wubi anything related to hard disk operations is noticeably faster.

      First post here, hi all πŸ™‚

    • Hellsbellboy
    • 12 years ago

    Well have it installed on a Dell 8300 desktop (old P4 3.ghz PC) and a new HP DV9700.. the desktop was easy.. the laptop didn’t work with Wubi and had to install it from disk.

    Takes a lot to get use too.. trying to get Beryl working but unable to find a guide that works with telling me how to set it up.

    Following this guide now just to get ‘use’ to Ubuntu (http://howtoforge.com/the-perfect-desktop-ubuntu-8.04-lts-hardy-heron).

    Still have a ways to go.. next after Beryl will be getting World of Warcraft working with Wine.

      • just brew it!
      • 12 years ago

      Just out of curiosity (I honestly don’t know) what is the advantage of Beryl over the stock compiz desktop?

        • bthylafh
        • 12 years ago

        There isn’t, anymore. Beryl is no more & re-merged with Compiz. The Beryl team is currently doing all the extra optional plug-ins for different sorts of eye candy.

      • roguecomgeek
      • 12 years ago

      wow works fine on my nvida mcp67 but ok my nephew’s ati card crashed on loading wow

    • just brew it!
    • 12 years ago

    While my primary desktops (home and work) are still XP, I’ve been using Linux on servers for several years, and dabbling with Fedora and Ubuntu on the desktop for a few months. I believe that Linux is ready for the desktop, with a few caveats — if you’re a gamer, or in a situation like the one Hance describes (i.e. you need to heavily use a specific Windows-only application), Linux is probably not for you. Wine can be a solution for some of these situations, but not all apps play nice with wine.

    I will be taking an Ubuntu laptop on the week-long business trip I’m going on next week. Just reformatted and installed 8.04 on a spare Compaq laptop (it’s an older one, from about 3 years ago) that we had at the office. The laptop is significantly more responsive than it was when running XP; right now I’m in the process of verifying that I can use Remote Desktop to connect from it to both my home and work desktops.

    I’ve also grabbed a full mirror of the entire Ubuntu 8.04 software repository (all 50+ GB of it!), and transfered it to a 2.5″ external hard drive. That way I should be able to explore the available packages to my hearts’ content, even while on the road. (I expect this trip to consist of long stretches of boredom punctuated by moments of sheer panic, so I figure I’ll have a fair bit of time to futz around and check out the 8.04 release.)

    • Oldtech
    • 12 years ago

    Ubuntu is okay. It will never replace Windows until the average user can install programs like they do in Windows.
    And using a terminal window is too much like DOS. UGH!

    Oldtech

      • bthylafh
      • 12 years ago

      The average user /could/ install programs like in Windows. It requires that 3rd-party programs bought in stores be Linux programs packaged in .deb format. If you download an Ubuntu-compatible .deb, it’s really easy to install it.

      • BobbinThreadbare
      • 12 years ago

      Have you ever heard of synaptic?

      Ubuntu has an even easier to use add/remove programs tool than that as well.

        • just brew it!
        • 12 years ago

        Bottom line is, if the package is something that is in your distro’s repository — which encompasses a /[

          • Saber Cherry
          • 12 years ago

          I don’t understand why installing anything on any OS takes any effort whatsoever. I write software. If anyone downloads it and unzips it, it runs. Making anything harder to use than that actually requires effort on the part of the developer to make things intentionally hard to use.

          What is wrong with software developers (and/or Linux distros) that “installing” software requires more effort than unzipping stuff to a directory? I just don’t understand at all. But if someone could explain, it would be helpful. Linux doesn’t have a registry or other useless crap to my knowledge, so what is the problem?

          P.S. Also, what is this “easier than Windows” stuff? I can download something, double-click on it, specify a directory, and it is installed. It is not possible to be easier than that, period. So… what are you talking about? Certainly it is possible for a developer to embed stupid stuff like splash screens and questions about your favorite pet’s name in the installer, but none of that has anything to do with Windows, and is possible in any OS. You can’t install something without downloading it, and you must be able to download something without installing it. You don’t want anything to install without double-clicking it. If any program tries to install itself without letting me specify a directory, I will delete it and never use that company again. Therefore, the process absolutely cannot be simpler. So… what /[

            • just brew it!
            • 12 years ago

            q[

            • Saber Cherry
            • 12 years ago

            I guess as long as I stick to Java, I am insulated from all those scary mutable APIs πŸ™‚ I admit that I have used Direct X acceleration in Java but it auto-detects the platform and disables it if unavailable.

            As for download/install managers, I hate them. I suppose some people might find it simpler to use some integrated combo download/configure/install panel within their OS, but I like everything standalone. That way, you can:

            Download a bunch of things while you are doing something else.
            If something goes wrong, download them again.
            Once you are done, install them.
            Burn them to a CD, or zip them up in a “Installers” directory.

            Plugins for Firefox are nice to be able to one-click download/install, so I appreciate the concept. But a while ago, Firefox 1.5 decided without my prior knowledge to start downloading/updating itself in the background. For some unrelated reason, I had to reboot my computer, or my video card (which was failing at the time) started glitching, or something… anyway, I manually powered off. Firefox got ****ed, and lost all my hundreds of bookmarks, and never worked correctly again until 2.0 came out. Of course, that has more to do with automatic updates than combined download/install managers… but I just don’t trust them. There are more things to go wrong, you have less control, the process is less reliable (since it integrally involves the internet – which is inherently ‘best-effort’ – in a process which modifies your computer’s configuration), and if it stalls… you don’t know why or at what stage it stalled, so you don’t know if it is safe to abort the process or reboot your computer without terminally screwing something up. So I /[

    • Ruiner
    • 12 years ago

    My main workstation is dual xp/ubuntu and has been for a while. My biggest gripe is poor suspend support….I think I’ve had it work on one hardware config perhaps 3 releases ago.

    5 button mouse support should also be GUI based. Having to tweak xorg.conf in a distro this advanced is kind of silly.

    The rest of the family’s boxen are straight Hardy Heron.

    • blitzy
    • 12 years ago

    damn i shoulda torrented an ubuntu iso, im using wubi and at 27% downloaded the transfer has become very slow 11KiB/s πŸ™

    12hrs remaining at this speed, anyone know if the download can be resumed from wubi?

    [edit] nevermind the wubi client can resume after all, so far so good [/edit]

      • Dirge
      • 12 years ago

      Get the Ubuntu iso as it has Wubi. But I think you will get a much better experience booting it natively. Its really kick ass if you spend a little time on it.

        • blitzy
        • 12 years ago

        I’m too lazy to repartition just for linux so Wubi is great for my situation, Im posting this from my wubi-installed ubuntu and I have to say it looks pretty snazzy so far, nice asthetics and seems very streamlined.. i dont have time to take a good look around right now though will have to see more later

    • alex666
    • 12 years ago

    I recently downloaded ubuntu 8.04 but have not yet installed it on a hdd yet. I’ve run prior versions of ubuntu and really liked it. For my work computer, ubuntu would be just fine. But like others here, for my home systems there are certain programs that linux does not yet cover, e.g., running a dedicated video capture card so I can watch tv on my computer while working. Also, I’ve tried dual-boot and even triple-boot systems in the past, and really prefer not to set up a system that way anymore. That said, I’ve got an older system collecting dust that has XP set up on it. Maybe I’ll give wubi a spin on that system.

    • sluggo
    • 12 years ago

    I’ve installed it and uninstalled it twice on my laptop without any difficulty or complications at all, and I consider myself a real novice with linux. I was impressed that it played so nice with Vista wrt the boot loader.

    What ruined it for me was the (un)support for the Broadcom 4311 wireless chipset in my lappy. The 8.04 release notes say that it should just work (it doesn’t), and neither of the two workarounds I found worked on my machine. Me grumpy.

    On the plus side, everything else worked, including the (easy) activiation of the nvidia drivers. Fun, I just wished the wireless worked.

      • Hance
      • 12 years ago

      Hmm might have to try Wubi on my Dell Laptop. It has some cheap azz dell wireless card in it that I dont think is ever going to work with linux.

    • thecoldanddarkone
    • 12 years ago

    I’ve used various linux distros ubuntu/fedora/kubuntu/suse over the last few years. In the end I always end up back on Windows. Linux is a tool and it’s just not a tool for my desktop. My problem (not really a problem) is that I always use the newest software tools and I like to play the newest games. The reality is that it’s not useful to me. It can’t do/or do what I need well without bandaid fixes.

    We use linux and window servers depending on what is the best solution for us. I just haven’t found a reason to use linux in my main machine.

    (most of our linux servers are ubuntu server installs)

    • bdwilcox
    • 12 years ago

    T-Shirt:
    /[

    • Shining Arcanine
    • 12 years ago

    I would like desktop linux to be useful, but until it is possible for me to run the latest version of Visual Studio, Age of Empires III and Project Reality for Battlefield 2 in WINE, I will be unable to make a complete switch and it will simply be there for when I need little else than an internet browser and/or unix terminal.

    By the way, I already have Ubuntu 8.04 installed on all of my computers via Wubi.

      • Heiwashin
      • 12 years ago

      I wouldn’t blame them for that. Just a reminder that direct3d is microsofts, it’s not fair to hold other os’s responsible for not playing them. Maybe one day opengl will take some kindof jump to make it more attractive.

        • BenBasson
        • 12 years ago

        Nobody’s blaming anyone or saying that there’s some kind of obligation for Linux developers to implement Direct3D, but lack of support for Direct3D is still an obstacle to adoption for many. PC gamers aren’t going to give up their games… most of us don’t actually hate Microsoft or Windows, so where’s the incentive?

    • Hance
    • 12 years ago

    I absolutely refuse to download WUBI. Seeing as how I am running Ubuntu as the sole OS on this laptop it wouldnt do me any good anyway. I think Linux works fine for web browsing, word processing, email etc. The only downfalls for me are no games and I have to have Acrobat Professional support. Reader isnt good enough because I build PDF files all the time.

      • BobbinThreadbare
      • 12 years ago

      I think there are open source programs which can create PDFs. I’m thinking even open office can save to PDF, but I may be mistaken.

        • Hance
        • 12 years ago

        I tried that route first. It didnt take me long to figure out you get what you pay for. For what I am doing it has to be Adobe.

          • thecoldanddarkone
          • 12 years ago

          I have to agree Acrobat Professional does work pretty well.

    • Prospero424
    • 12 years ago

    Ubuntu’s great, although I prefer Kubuntu (the KDE-centric release), but I’ve kind of gotten away from Linux in the last year or so in favor of messing around with FreeBSD and PC-BSD in particular:

    Β§[<http://www.pcbsd.org/<]Β§ Certainly, Linux may be better for certain tasks and for certain people. It's the ultimate tinkerer's OS, and that's a really powerful thing to be, but I prefer the BSD approach - consistency, stability, and performance. I wasn't expecting this when I first switched over, but my BSD system actually is quite a bit more responsive than my (K)Ubuntu/Fedora systems were on the same hardware and running the same applications. Nifty stuff. But as to the issue at hand: yes, I think the *nux desktop is perfectly viable and perhaps even preferable as long as one of these two things are true for the prospective user: 1. They want a system that's rock-solid and runs a limited set of applications that they know they want to use on a regular basis; that they don't want to be constantly tweaking, upgrading, and trying new things. 2. They are technically proficient enough to learn to use the command line interface and the fundamentals of *nix if they don't want live under the above limitation.

    • roguecomgeek
    • 12 years ago

    I am using Wubi right now. A few server admins at work use Ubuntu on their main computer because they mainly just check their email threw owa using Evolution mail and remote to servers. they even got dual screens to run perty good.

    • etilena
    • 12 years ago

    Another way to try it is to just download the Ubuntu ISO via bittorent, mount the ISO on daemon tools and run wubi from there. At least this way you don’t have to wait for Ubuntu to download.

      • mantismag
      • 12 years ago

      if you put the iso in the same directory as the wubi.exe it will detect it and use that instead of downloading. i did this as i tried it the weekend after release and the wubi download was pretty slow.

    • Lianna
    • 12 years ago

    I have Fedora Core 4 on Virtual PC since FC4 went gold. It’s even better and simpler, and I can work in both, in windowed mode, or switch to FC4 full screen, and hibernate/unhibernate and suspend/resume at will.

    Much more convenient than dual boot. Download VPC, install, download FC4.iso (or any other distro you like), mount in VPC as a virtual drive, go. Best of both worlds in one.

    Anyway, it’s software that makes the difference. Both ways.

    • 5150
    • 12 years ago

    Wow, this is probably going to be the most exciting Friday night I’ve had in a long time!

    πŸ™

    • lethal
    • 12 years ago

    I was gonna try this, but not being able to select which mirror to use sucks, since the default one in my case DL at 4KiB/s :S.

    • emi25
    • 12 years ago

    When I can install Steam and My Games, I will say: good bye Windows.
    2-4 years from now ?

      • bthylafh
      • 12 years ago

      I assume you saw the TR story a couple days ago about Valve porting the Source engine to Linux? One assumes that Steam will have to be brought along.

      I can run Steam in a recent build of Wine myself, though the game (Red Orchestra: Ostfront) isn’t really playable.

        • emi25
        • 12 years ago

        in 2 years, I hope Valve to port The Source Engine and be stable, and with all the games behind it. Maybe sooner, or I am just too optimistic ?

      • adisor19
      • 12 years ago

      Umm, you can install Steam through Wine or Crossover i think. At least i know it works on the mac.

      Adi

    • bjm
    • 12 years ago

    I installed Ubuntu via Wubi about a day after 8.04 came out. After a smooth installation and boot up, my experience was cut short by the fact that I installed it on my laptop, which is connected to my CRT, and Ubuntu would only want to show up on my laptop’s LCD rather than the CRT. I went about trying to install the nVidia drivers, but the servers were dog slow at the moment I tried. Booted back into Windows and uninstalled it.

    But with that all said, I’m sick at home from work and I’m installing it again as I write. Hopefully I can get it working this time around!

    • Jeffery
    • 12 years ago

    I know many people (ie non power users) who are afraid to dual boot linux because they are worried about screwing up their windows partition. instillation via wubi really changes the game, and opens ubuntu up to a whole slew of people.

    I have been using ubuntu as my primary OS on my main desktop and notebook for about two years now, and I could not be happier!

    • derFunkenstein
    • 12 years ago

    I’ll try this tonight when I’m drunk. If I can install it drunk, anybody can do it sober. πŸ˜€

    Is it compatible with 64-bit Windows installs? Their website just says “Vista”

      • DrDillyBar
      • 12 years ago

      Ubuntu Under the Influence. lol.
      As for the x64 support, I tried the x64 distro with my x64 Vista and it did not complain about anything when installing. I’ve tried setting my mobo’s RAID various ways, but no go unfortunately. I’ve yet to try it on my x86 Vista notebook.
      Update: I messed with my BIOS dumbing down my JMicron controler, and it did boot into Ubuntu and start the setup process. But upon further reboots it’s now giving my partition not found errors. I have no choice but to load Vista. πŸ™

        • derFunkenstein
        • 12 years ago

        It was surprisingly boring. Download the tiny install, then wait while it downloaded everything else. I was very impressed with how painless it all is, though, and how it seems like the disk performance isn’t all that impacted.

    • FubbHead
    • 12 years ago

    I still don’t like how everything depends on everything. I’d rather see these distros sticking to a system + GUI core, and let others distribute the right libraries with their application, or some such.

    Which leads to another dislike; that it is so centralized. If you don’t fancy a lot of tinkering, you’re a slave to the packet manager. I prefer a more decentralized package distribution (alΓ‘ Windows).

    And yes, there’s a lot I don’t like about the 50-60 years old design of it, like the filesystem conventions and such. I would like to see a bit more abstraction in that department aswell.

      • Forge
      • 12 years ago

      You describe OSX. FS mostly abstracted away, install packages from just wherever, warts and all, and system/app libs segregated.

      No, really, you described it, I just named it.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 12 years ago

        not really – the library problems are solved by the fact there aren’t hundreds of OS X distros, not that the OS doesn’t supply alot of the libs required for hte apps to run.

          • adisor19
          • 12 years ago

          Whatever the case may be, the end result is that this problem does not exist on OS X.

          Adi

        • FubbHead
        • 12 years ago

        Yes, and no. OS X has a lot of good points, but there’s also a lot about OS X that outright kills the joy. In the same sense why I rather use KDE over Gnome. And while the FS is abstracted away, isn’t much of the old still lingering in forms of hidden links and such? Like in BeOS?

      • ew
      • 12 years ago

      If you want to make your own package that includes all the libraries it needs there is nothing stopping you from doing that. If you want a slim system then don’t install everything.

      The reason the standard Ubuntu packages are so dependent on each other is because the package maintainers are all cooperatively working together. Open source developers aren’t competing against each other. If two projects want to use libpng then it makes a lot more sense for them to use the same binary.

      If your a commercial software developer then it probably makes more sense to roll your own library binaries to insure compatibility across multiple distribution versions. You just have to make sure your playing nice with the distributions file system.

      • kc77
      • 12 years ago

      Windows is definitely not decentralized. Are you kidding me? Direct X, XML Libraries, Windows Installer, ODBC, .NET Framework all of these libraries can depend on one another in regards to the product you are trying to install. I think OS X probably comes the closest to what you are describing.

    • mantismag
    • 12 years ago

    tried it on my desktop and it fails to boot ubuntu. tried it on the laptop and everything is fine but wireless either isn’t working or its usage is non-obvious. this is why i haven’t been able to do more than dabble in linux. i’m just too lazy to figure it out if it doesn’t work out of the box.

    on the plus side the fact that it uninstalls cleanly and i didn’t have to create any partitions or screw with the MBR means i’m much more willing to try again at a later date.

      • Forge
      • 12 years ago

      If you try it again, look through the icons in the upper menu bar (assuming you tried the Gnome-based Ubuntu and not the sister KDE-based Kubuntu). There should be an icon there that is your networking voodoo. Generally enabling wi-fi is just a matter of clicking that and picking your network. If it doesn’t detect/enable/use your Wifi, you’re in the unfortunate minority whose wifi just plain won’t work. It’s a shrinking group, but that’s cold comfort. Generally you would need to gift flaming bags of feces to either/both your wifi chipset maker and the FCC to get the stupid 1970s thinking out and open drivers in.

        • adisor19
        • 12 years ago

        Yep, i’m in the minority. I installed Ubuntu in Fusion and low and behold, my Linksys WUSB11 v2.5 (Prism2 based which SHOULD work fine) is not working πŸ™

        So much for cracking WEP hotspots now :'(

        Adi

    • Shinare
    • 12 years ago

    As soon as I can play my games on Linux, I’m all over it and will drop microsoft like a hot rock. Since that is what I spend %99 of my time on my home computer doing, it would make zero sense to use Linux. And since theres no way I could convince the entire populous at the place I work to completely learn a new operating system, develop our software for it, and IT to learn how to support it, I believe that Linux is still as far away as it was.

      • Damage
      • 12 years ago

      Stop with these irrelevant posts! Did you try Wubi? What did you think of Ubuntu? The FNT is not amused.

        • Shinare
        • 12 years ago

        *sigh* r[<<]r

          • ludi
          • 12 years ago

          Uh-oh, he’s on his last breath! We need 5GB of Wubi, /[

            • Shinare
            • 12 years ago

            Heh, well, I’m just wondering why my direct answer to the question the artical poses which is :

            r[

    • gohan
    • 12 years ago

    If i already have a machine using Ubuntu & XP dual boot. Will Wubi update just the Ubuntu part ?

    • DrDillyBar
    • 12 years ago

    I tried this feature a week ago or so.
    When I boot, I select Ubuntu from the menu. Then 10 seconds later, my system reboots and I get the menu again. πŸ™
    Doh!

      • MBIlover
      • 12 years ago

      Happened to me too, messed up my XP boot too. Still haven’t figured it out and can’t install SP3. Double doh!

      Sadly, not sure why Ubuntu/Wubi won’t install on my system.

      • Meadows
      • 12 years ago

      Ha! Take that, freeloaders!
      <villainous laughter>

      • liar
      • 12 years ago

      Ditto here

    • cygnus1
    • 12 years ago

    it might have been my use of raid on my motherboard (nforce 5xx i think), but wubi wouldn’t work for me. it got so far as to add the line item to my vista boot menu, but it would just lock up when trying to start it.

    might have to try it again since i wiped and reloaded and chose not to use the raid this time

      • Forge
      • 12 years ago

      What’s ironic is that Linux installs are getting better and better about automagically detecting and enabling fakeraid/software RAIDs.

      A normal Ubuntu install would probably work fine, but Wubi has too many intermediate hurdles to jump.

    • Synchromesh
    • 12 years ago

    QA department says there is a typo in first sentence. πŸ™‚ I think you meant to say “unplanned” instead of “uplanned”.

    Aside from that, I might try Wubi on my main system sometime. It’s the only one that has no Linux in any form on it. Go Ubuntu!

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