VIA preps 45nm, dual-core chips for 2009

Next year, VIA’s processors may have much in common with Intel’s current Core 2 Duo CPUs: dual cores, an out-of-order architecture, and 45nm process technology. Quoting sources at VIA, DigiTimes reports that the company will introduce its first 45nm, dual-core processors "by the end of 2009." The chips will most likely be based off VIA’s new Isaiah core.

Speaking of Isaiah, DigiTimes says it has learned some details about the first Isaiah CPU VIA will crank out later this year. The chip will apparently run at 2GHz and feature a V4 bus clocked at 800-1333MHz. As we suspected, it will be based on Fujitsu’s 65nm process technology. Oddly,though, the DigiTimes report says the chip will have "two 64KB L1 cache and 1MB L2 cache pairs with 16-way associatively."  That’s probably not entirely accurate.  As we noted in our overview of the Isaiah architecture, the initial Isaiah-based products will be single-core processors with a 64KB L1 data cache, a 64KB L1 instruction cache, and a single 1MB L2 cache.  Each of those caches will be 16-way set associative.  Future dual-core variants of Isaiah may have dual L2 caches, of course.

DigiTimes adds that VIA expects its CPU shipments increase by 20% to 30% this year. Shipments in the first half of this year should "equal total shipments in 2007," as well.

Comments closed
    • Auril4
    • 11 years ago

    Was it Via that Intel was threatening and intimidating last year to keep them from getting into the chip business?

    • ish718
    • 11 years ago

    It will take some time for VIA to become a “real competitor” to AMD and Intel just like how it took time for AMD to become a threat to Intel. Stuff like this doesn’t happen overnight, I’ll give VIA a chance and see what they can come out with…

    • pogsnet
    • 11 years ago
      • stmok
      • 11 years ago

      They have about 100 or so engineers.

      Their design goals are low cost, low power, “adequate performance” solutions.

      They don’t have the engineering, manufacturing and marketing resources of Intel. (Let alone AMD).

      What do you expect from them? Can you do better?

    • Rza79
    • 11 years ago

    Cyril you read it wrong or better, they translated badly.
    With: “two 64KB L1 cache and 1MB L2 cache pairs with 16-way associatively” they mean 2 x 64KB L1 (D & I) and 1 x 1MB L2. The “two” just refers to the instruction and data cache.

    • Hattig
    • 11 years ago

    Well I wish them the best of luck with that, but they’ll have to come up with something to make them desirable – passive cooling at 2GHz, or a cheap platform, or mini-ITX boards that aren’t a total rip-off.

      • Dirge
      • 11 years ago

      Thats exactly how I feel. I hope its passive or there will be no advantage in my eyes.

    • Dirge
    • 11 years ago

    Lets see how warm they get.

    • ssidbroadcast
    • 11 years ago

    Dang. Slow TR day.

    • phileasfogg
    • 11 years ago

    The “democratization” of processor technology is truly upon us! Bravo to this plucky little company for pushing further and further into advanced process technology and creating a nice growing niche for itself.

      • indeego
      • 11 years ago

      See #6. Via is exactly where it was 10 years agog{<.<}g

    • Forge
    • 11 years ago

    Via, bringing you yesterday’s technology tomorrow!

    • A_Pickle
    • 11 years ago

    No shared L2 cache? For shame. 🙁

      • Rza79
      • 11 years ago

      just joking or what?
      It’s single core dude!

    • nonegatives
    • 11 years ago

    No love for VIA.

    • nookie
    • 11 years ago

    Hum just one thing, is it too hard to write “prepares” properly?

      • ShinyN00b
      • 11 years ago

      Are you serious?

      • UberGerbil
      • 11 years ago

      He wasn’t writing “prepares”; he was writing “preps” — it’s a valid noun in its own right dating back at least to the 19th century. And the prep schools and prep races and prep chefs are quite happy with it. I don’t see why Cyril has to restrict himself to some arbitrarily circumscribed vocabulary.

        • MadManOriginal
        • 11 years ago

        The ‘prep’ in all your examples stands for ‘preparatory’ though 😉 which shares a common root with, you guessed it, ‘prepare’! Nothing wrong with using a commonly accepted shortened word in a headline though.

          • UberGerbil
          • 11 years ago

          Yes, but a lot of dictionaries now accept it as a separate word in its own right, rather than just an abbreviated form of a longer word.

          And yes, headlines are supposed to be short — using shortened forms is the accepted style, indeed, that’s the pref.

            • Shining Arcanine
            • 11 years ago

            In that case, the dictionaries are wrong, as it is an abbreviation.

            • ludi
            • 11 years ago

            Your grasp of language is a bit shaky. Dictionaries are based on lexicographical surveys, i.e., how do a majority of people recognize ‘x’ as a word? If so, what meaning do a majority of them associate with it? Etc.

            That is how languages are formed, and that is how languages change. /[

      • indeego
      • 11 years ago

      If there were no variations in language I think we’d still be grunting to get us the last piece of meat off that boneg{<.<}g

        • BobbinThreadbare
        • 11 years ago

        Sounds like my family at thanksgiving.

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This