10-inch Eee PC 1000 to launch early next month

Asus may end up introducing not one, but two new Eee PC models next month at Computex. We’ve already heard about (and seen pictures of) the Atom-based Eee PC 901, but now UMPC Fever quotes an Asus statement that says an Eee PC 1000-series laptop will launch at the same time.

Judging by the name, the Eee PC 1000 may very well have a 10" display—up from the Eee PC 900/901’s 8.9" screen and the Eee PC 701’s 7" panel. The Asus statement doesn’t say much about the machine other than the name, though, and we’re left to wonder whether it will feature a Celeron processor like existing models or an Atom chip like the 901. However, we already have a pretty good idea of what it will look like:

Asus showcased a 10" Eee PC 1001 at Computex last year, and we were lucky enough to take photos of it in the company’s show booth. Asus may have updated the design in the meantime, but the system we saw featured a larger keyboard, a different hinge design, and a thinner palm rest area than today’s 701 and 900 systems.

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    • ew
    • 11 years ago

    Haha, 10″ Eee P-[

    • paulWTAMU
    • 11 years ago

    It’s sad to see a market pioneer miss the point entirely isn’t it? The early E’s were compelling enough for what they were, but given this things size and probable price, why wouldn’t you get a 12″ laptop instead? With the E 700 series, at least they were a *lot* smaller than a standard lappy. This thing, isn’t nearly so much.

      • HalcYoN[nV]
      • 11 years ago

      Funny that everyone said the 7″screen was too small to be usable. I know that is not the case as I have an EEE 701, using it to post this message. The 900 ups the size and price, but people want its updates for free. Not how it works. Too much demand. Now 10″ is too big and Asus is losing sight.

      Trouble is the market is creating the products and the price points based on demand. Is Asus supposed to not create products to sell?

        • ludi
        • 11 years ago

        First, let’s see if it actually sells, or if people shopping in this market segment end up either going for the more common 12″ models or the cheaper, smaller units instead. Revealed preference, and all that — anybody can oggle a showroom model when they don’t have to put money on the line.

        Going back to the car analogies, the US Big Three respectively greenlighted the Prowler, the new Tbird, and the SSR based on highly positive responses at autoshows and in the trade press. All of these suffered premature death because they didn’t sell well enough.

          • HalcYoN[nV]
          • 11 years ago

          Not a fair comparison. The T-Bird and Prowler were junk covered by a retro skin that was instantly the “would you look at that” hit. The subnotebook is instead a practical device for doing what most of us do with our PCs, abuse the internet. My desktop is neglected.

          I could have gotten a full-sized budget refurb laptop for the price of my eee with the 2GB memory upgrade and 8GB SD card, but it just wouldn’t come close to being as portable or convenient to use. The 10″ will still be drastically smaller than any 14″-15″ in its price range. EEE, Wind, Mini-Note all have the intangible of being anywhere PCs. We throw the eee in the wife’s purse in case we need to hop on a hot-spot and wiki for dispute resolution or buy movie tickets.

          Prowler, T-Bird, SSR, all junk that had no substance to back the style, just neat to look at because it reminded people of the old days. The subnote, not the same; teacher’s aid, kids first computer, hackers warring, carputer, linux testbox, gamers internet couch surfer to save electricity and cooling costs. So few things in the tech world have such a varied group of users. Just spend some time at eeeuser.com.

            • ludi
            • 11 years ago

            Yeah, but we don’t know all of the pricetags yet. If these new 10″ models are encroaching too much on 12″ territory in their pricing, they can kiss their primary market goodbye, because all they will do is draw attention to the fact that the 12″ units exist while sending the budget buyers scurrying back to 8-9″ territory.

            Also, I think you’re being unkind on the car analogy ๐Ÿ˜‰ IMO the real problem with all of those models is the same one that could come up here: only a limited amount of utility is purchased for a price that becomes substantial, and most people — no matter how much they might /[

            • HalcYoN[nV]
            • 11 years ago

            I guess you aren’t getting the concept of the subnote not being an occasional toy. Mine is on for eight to ten hours a day, streaming audio at the office. I use to check email, browse, catch the news,etc. I only turn on the PC to sync the Zune, game and work on the finances.

            How many “regular” people online only need a web browser and email client, the latter now optional? Most of us here are nothing more then web-trolling review consumers on the quest for more semi-useless knowledge. The EEE is practical, even with the small screen and keyboard because it doesn’t matter where you go. As long as you have a means to get online, it is in its element. Even when you aren’t, many older games that are still popular run great. I play Q3A at the office every once in a while. You can also install an SNES emulator and get a mini game pad.

            So yes, your analogy is not valid. The EEE,Wind and MiniNote are all relatively affordable. In fact, the 2G Surf is the best deal going for simple webpliance. $299? Crazy cheap. I put way more hours on the EEE than my similar expense 8800GTX. If I had to choose, I’d take the EEE.

            So, the summary is – The EEE changed how I use my desktop. I don’t turn it on unless I need it. In fact, the high end desktop PC is a better comparison to the Prowler, SSR and T-Bird. The specs look cool in your signature, but 90% of the time, a Honda Civic is what you need.

            • Nelliesboo
            • 11 years ago

            Agreed to both your post.

            • ludi
            • 11 years ago

            I get the feeling we’re talking right past each other, and I’m not sure why. The point was that people will spend money on impulse up to some threshold, and then they will demand more function before justifying an additional outlay.

            In my case, I bought a 4G Surf back in March. I like, as it totes around much more readily when I just want Internet with a possibility of light office work. The $350 pricetag made the sale. $400 would have been pushing “too much” for my budget and at $500+, forget it — I’ve already got a $650 Centrino notebook. If I could afford two of those, I would have bought one $900 notebook in the first place and spent the difference on a better cell phone.

            My view is that these 10″ units are rapidly taking the “sub” out of subnotebook (size, price) while still making the compromises (reduced size keyboards, reduced-performance hardware platforms, no optical drives). At some point, a buyer is going to find themselves staring at a large, expensive “sub”-notebook and a 12″ mininotebook, and realize that just $200 more will buy a DVD player, a much faster processor, a better keyboard, and higher screen resolution without a significant increase in physical dimensions and weight. Cha-ching…

    • d0g_p00p
    • 11 years ago

    I wonder how much Asus will charge for this model, $749, $849??

    • Hattig
    • 11 years ago

    Too large to be a compelling purchase unless the screen is 1280×800 or if it is a lot slimmer.

    A second hand 12″ iBook or Powerbook is a very viable alternative otherwise, never mind second hand older PC laptops with 10″ – 12″ screens.

    The 9″ is pushing it in my opinion. An 8″ 1024×600 thin-bezel small-keyboard EeePC would be interesting though.

    • Nelliesboo
    • 11 years ago

    To little to late… Beat by MSI… (and it’s $399)

    • UberGerbil
    • 11 years ago

    Ludi was right — just as with cars, the subcompact bloat continues until they’re no smaller than the model segment to which they used to be a refreshing alternative.

      • ludi
      • 11 years ago

      Hey, even *I* can call one right now and then ๐Ÿ˜‰

    • BoBzeBuilder
    • 11 years ago

    Tiny PC’s are taking over the world.

      • UberGerbil
      • 11 years ago

      They’re not so tiny anymore. This looks about the same as a bunch of 10″ ultraportables that have been available (in Japan at least) for years.

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