Acer to push Linux on regular notebooks

Could low-cost subnotebooks be a stepping stone for Linux to make its way onto standard-sized laptops? Judging by a new VNUnet report, that may well be the case. The site quotes senior Acer staff as saying the company plans to pre-load Linux not just on the newly launched Aspire one, but also other notebooks.

Acer Marketing VP Gianpiero Morbello told VNUnet, “We have shifted towards Linux because of Microsoft.” He added, “Microsoft has a lot of power and it is going to be difficult, but we will be working hard to develop the Linux market.” He believes the low cost and smaller footprint of Linux distributions will sway customers, as well. Acer’s Linux distro of choice can supposedly boot in just 15 seconds and “extend battery life from five to seven hours.”

Price should also be a factor. Morbello says a Windows license costs about £50 ($98) per unit, so going with Linux can yield significant savings on cheaper notebooks. Morbello didn’t reveal when Acer plans to start its big Linux push, but as we reported earlier this morning, the Aspire one will appear in the early part of the third quarter with a choice of Linux or Windows XP OSes.

Comments closed
    • TheTechReporter
    • 11 years ago

    Believe me, I’m all for diversity, but Usacomp2k3 is absolutely right.
    “Joe Sixpack” will never _ever_ switch to Linux unless there is a standardized version. Period.

    The problem is that none of us here are Joe Sixpack. We actually give a rat’s ass about customization. Believe me, Joe does not. He wants a computer that he already knows how to use. He will _not_ take the time or effort to learn multiple programs that do the same thing (multiple spreadsheet programs, etc.) Typically, he will just learn the bare minimum needed to scrape by in the program that came with his PC, never bothering to become an expert in the program, and never even caring that alternative programs exist.

    However, all is not lost. Just give Joe Sixpack the Ubuntu he wants, and give him the option of using other distros (or rolling his own) if he actually wants to learn what the hell “Linux” is. He probably won’t, of course, but it won’t hurt to add links to websites about other Linux distros.

    • PenGun
    • 11 years ago

    Slackware works well on my cheap ass Aspire 5315. The fan works, got the Intel drivers running the G965 chipset and the video stuff. It is pretty well working with everything but sound. That I’ll fix soon.

    Ubuntu and Fedora 9 work pretty well too although the video driver requires some “alignment”. Sound works with both of them.

    Slackware is my favorite so I’ll stick to it. Just wanted to see where the other distros are with respect to laptops. You could get pretty near anything to run with the modern kernels if you want to beat on it a bit.

    • deruberhanyok
    • 11 years ago

    Just to share my two cents: I don’t think that a single distro is needed to push acceptance. I think the prevalence of GNOME in many of the distros works well, given that it bears just enough resemblance to Windows and Mac OS X that people can grasp it.

    I think more manufacturers pushing it is only a good thing. This means a wider spread of machines will be available that are fully compatible with Linux, no funky driver madness required, or that more devices will become compatible with it so that device manufacturers can continue to push those parts to OEMs. Either way the result is the same: better compatibility and more work being done on improving open source software.

      • stmok
      • 11 years ago

      Essentially, what you’re saying is: *[

    • Heiwashin
    • 11 years ago

    whoops wrong place

    • Hattig
    • 11 years ago

    As many other people have pointed out with regards to the EeePC et al, you can get full size laptops for under $500 these days. If Windows is going to be 20% of that cost, then they could be $400 laptops…

      • Perezoso
      • 11 years ago

      Linux also has a smaller footprint on embedded flash storage, enabling further savings to be made.

        • mad dog
        • 11 years ago

        heck … why do we need a gui in first place? Linux cli is so much more powerful and graphical effects CAN be run within the cli …. add to that to the coolness factor 😛 and you’re ready to rock’n roll

    • Usacomp2k3
    • 11 years ago

    I would agree with that.
    Each company pushing their own distro is preventing the more widespread usage, IMHO.

      • vorgusa
      • 11 years ago

      Why would each company push their own distro.. Dell did not. They picked one that was already out there.

        • Usacomp2k3
        • 11 years ago

        I’m just saying that all of these mini-laptops that I have seen all have a different flavor of linux on them. Thus one can not just pick up a linux laptop and know how to use it because they’ve used linux before (specifically joe-sixpack).

          • stmok
          • 11 years ago

          Depends on the person, the GUI being used, and how the manufacturer implements them.

          If they’ve been taught “to use Windows” instead of “to use a computer”, then there are going to be issues. (They’ve been molded into thinking Windows is the PC, and to escape it, you need to buy a Mac,)

          For example: In high school, I was taught computer basics that wasn’t specifically tied to Microsoft solutions. So when they taught me spreadsheets, they showed me the basic idea of it and what its for. (I was exposed to various implementations to get a feel of spreadsheets).

          So you can toss me on Windows, Mac, Linux, BSD, etc based system, using OpenOffice, Abiword, Gnumeric, KOffice, Lotus Symphony, etc and I’ll be fine.

          Today, it seems its a different story. When courses teach spreadsheet or word processing, they teach Microsoft Excel and Word. That’s it…And that’s also bad! If you put that person on anything other than MS solutions, they’re lost!

          Although, I don’t think your point is much of an issue if the manufacturer creates an easy GUI like what ASUS has done with their EeePC. (Its KDE with a custom tabbed GUI).

          People seem to be willing to learn new things if you make it simple and interesting enough for them. I don’t see first time Mac users having super major issues that prevents their adoption. (After they’ve forked out money for one).

    • Usacomp2k3
    • 11 years ago

    They really need to standardize on a distro for this to work, IMHO. Or at least on an desktop manager if they want Joe Sixpack to use it.

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This