Eee PC 1000H to cost $649 in the U.S.

At long last, Asus has released prices for its upcoming Eee PC 901 and 1000 low-cost subnotebooks. According to Laptop Magazine, the Eee PC 901 will launch at $599 in both its Windows- and Linux-based iterations. The Windows-based Eee PC 1000H will cost $649, while the vanilla Eee PC 1000 will be a relatively hefty $699. Asus did, however, warn that pricing for the 1000H and 1000 models is "estimated and subject to change."

Those prices are all significantly higher than the $549 Asus charges for its Celeron-based Eee PC 900. Judging by the specifications the company released a few days ago, the Eee PC 1000H will carry an 80GB mechanical hard drive, while the 1000 will have a 40GB solid-state drive. The high cost of SSDs would seem to explain why the Eee PC 1000 will be so expensive. Both the 1000 and the 1000H will also have 10" displays, Atom processors, and weights of around three pounds (1.33-1.45 kg).

At this point, it’s interesting to note that $649 is enough to buy a full-blown 14.1" Dell Inspiron with a dual-core Intel processor, Windows Vista Home Premium, a 120GB hard drive, and a DVD burner. The Eee PC may be more attractive to folks looking for a second, more portable laptop, however.

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    • d0g_p00p
    • 12 years ago

    Like I have stated many times. Asus has completely lost focus on what the EeePC is. $649? You have to be joking. I own the 701 and my sights are set on the MSI Wind. Sub $500 is where this needs to be.

      • HalcYoN[nV]
      • 12 years ago

      I still do not understand these posts. Asus still sells the 4G. If you want cheap, there you go, especially with rumored price cuts coming for the 701 and 900 models. The market is driving the price. If they didn’t think it would sell at $650, they wouldn’t price it $650. If you want an EEE 1000H to cost under $650, start a campaign to prevent people that want it at that price from buying them. Easy.

      I bet Asus is still kicking themselves in the head for not charging $450 for the 4G. Given their popularity at release, they could have gotten that sum for a while.

    • lucas1985
    • 12 years ago

    Right now, the Eee PC has three remaining issues:
    – chipset, which eats too much power and it isn’t powerful enough to play OLD games and to watch some types of video (high CPU use and no quality enhancement)
    – keyboard, which still has some quirks. The keyboard on the HP 2133 seems to be the best.
    – price, which seems to be getting out of control.
    Also, the (current) Eee PC has five strong advantages:
    – a fine CPU for the intended usage which draws little power and it’s very cool. The Eee PC doesn’t get hot and the fan doesn’t need to spin at high RPMs.
    – a screen size and resolution which are more than good enough.
    – very good battery life (over 4 hours with wireless enabled, full brightness and an appreciable workload according to TrustedReviews)
    – a decent feature-set in the areas of connectivity, expansion options, RAM size and storage size.
    – a nice software bundle (the custom Linux build)

    I expect that the market forces (demand, competition), the technology advancements (better chipset, smaller manufacturing process) and improved engineering (re-designed keyboard, etc) will fix the current issues and continue to improve on the strong points.

    • HalcYoN[nV]
    • 12 years ago

    We are at a point where an average person could have two computers or more. I have my desktop gaming rig, an EEE 4G and a work laptop. For the household, add a laptop for the wife and a wii for browsing and gamines. I am fighting urges to build an HTPC/storage server. Include a usb print server, Slinbox and a Zune that accesses the PC via wireless and I have a network of eight devices, soon to be nine, for two people.

    The 4G is plenty for my purposes. If you want a little more, the 901 and 1000, MSI Wind and MiniNote could replace a desktop. The EEE has taught me alot about what a computer needs to be given the widespread access to the intarwebs out there.

    • Nelliesboo
    • 12 years ago

    Why would you pay $100 more for this over the Msi Model ?

    • Hattig
    • 12 years ago

    X = standard price of cheap but okay laptop.

    When the EeePC was X/2 in cost, it was a no brainer purchase, and the portability was a nice aspect, and the negatives were acceptable for the cost.

    At X an EeePC is a much tougher sell because it is much weaker than the alternative (even if it is smaller) and it isn’t as light either. So when you are laying down X for something, it’s not a no brainer and you have to consider which to get – the faster more powerful laptop that is still a low-end laptop, or the weaker, lighter, but a lot of compromises EeePC.

    And then there is a cheaper Wind alternative to boot.

    • BobbinThreadbare
    • 12 years ago

    I just saw the orginal Asus Eee yesterday, and that thing is small. I read all the articles about it, but it doesn’t prepare you for the actual thing. However, I think it’s too small, at least the screen is. I don’t think I could do anything useful on it.

      • HalcYoN[nV]
      • 12 years ago

      I am a 4G 701 owner. I watched the Euro 2008 and the US Open over the Slingbox at work yesterday. I stream audio (woxy.lala.com). I post replies about EEEs to Tech Report. I watch movies on hulu.com while waiting on my car to get inspected.

      Pretty useless.

        • cegras
        • 12 years ago

        How many companies did you shill in that one post?

          • HalcYoN[nV]
          • 12 years ago

          Oh, I apologize for highlighting actual applications and websites that work well on the EEE. I am sure that a reply of “I did some stuff on my EEE” would have been just as useful. Would I have avoided your wrath by saying that I used Firefox, Ubuntu and winamp?

          I have seen the errors of my ways. That said, Tech Report should be ashamed of their Deal of the Week posts.

            • ludi
            • 12 years ago

            Eh, you’re just giving him a bridge to play under, which is apparently what he wants.

            • HalcYoN[nV]
            • 12 years ago

            A generic open source bridge…

            • UberGerbil
            • 12 years ago

            And all over the web, eyes roll.

          • eitje
          • 12 years ago

          Read up on what a shill is, cegrass.

          §[<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shill<]§

    • UberGerbil
    • 12 years ago

    ————————–

    • UberGerbil
    • 12 years ago

    If you factor in the cost of the SSD (ie, if you bought a competitor you’d then have to buy an aftermarket SSD and swap it in) the price is pretty reasonable, though the market for ultra-small, highly-shock tolerant notebooks may be fairly small. Then again, like Hance with his GPS, there may be new markets that open up.

    It will be interesting to see the battery life of both versions. They’re going to be handicapped by Intel’s chipset, however.

    • eitje
    • 12 years ago

    Dear Asus,

    I’m not sure I understand what you’re doing here.

    I – like many of my fellows – appreciated the novelty of your original EEEPC. When it launched, everyone discussed “Is this an appliance, or an actual computer?” That was a lot of fun, and I think we all generally settled on “actual computer” once the hackers came out and found new and interesting things to do with it. Then the arguments turned to “Can you REALLY have an actual computer for only $300?” I feel that debate still rages on around your original product.

    Now that you’re introducing newer, bigger, more expensive models, I think my questions are changing. Regarding the new computers, I have to ask: “What are they REALLY offering me?” Because, at this point, there isn’t a lot of novelty to a 3.2 pound, $700 computer. I hope you have a trick up your sleeve on this one, Asus, because you’re only a few inches away from the “subnote” ceiling.

    Thank you for your time!

    eitje

      • bthylafh
      • 12 years ago

      ‘Cause it’s cheaper than other laptops of the same dimensions and weight? If you want a highly portable laptop but don’t want to spend $2k or whatever, and you don’t mind it being a bit slower than other ultraportables, sounds like even the 10″ Eee is what you want.

        • UberGerbil
        • 12 years ago

        Exactly. Especially if you want the SSD.

        • eitje
        • 12 years ago

        Yeah, I see what you’re saying. I mean, it’s the common argument – value versus cost, right? I guess I’m questioning that balance, here.

        The 1000 is more than double the price of the original EEE, but with roughly the same specs. It has more storage and a bigger screen, but the proc is a wash, comparatively. So, for the cost of two Original EEEs, I’m getting a 10″ screen and 20x the storage space.

        Well, for the cost of an additional EEE (ie – 50% more than the 1000), I can get a 13″ screen, a dual core processor, 100x the storage space, a DVD Burner, 2 GB RAM, and one year in-home service – the XPS 1330 from Dell. It’s only half a pound heavier than the 1000, too.

        I hope I’ve made my point clear, here – the value proposition is rapidly diminishing on these systems, and there’s only so much further up the chain they can go before they start running into the entrenched OEMs and their higher-capacity computers.

    • Prototyped
    • 12 years ago

    Just because the Eee PC was the first of the genre doesn’t mean it’s the most cost-effective or the most interesting. The MSI Wind looks a lot more interesting. The same form factor, an 80 GB 5400 rpm hard disk and about $150-200 less. And if you can give up the 2.5″ form factor drive, the Acer Aspire One is even cheaper.

    The appropriate comparison isn’t really to a 14.1″ Inspiron (or Vostro, which is priced like an Inspiron but actually has metal in its frame), but more like a 10.6″ Fujitsu Lifebook P7230[1], which costs upward of $1,550. (Of course, it’s also built better, has more features and has an honest-to-goodness LV Core Solo. But ultraportables have traditionally been the most expensive notebooks.)

    [1] §[<http://www.expansys-usa.com/d.aspx?i=150915<]§

      • ludi
      • 12 years ago

      I think the point Cyril was making with the Inspiron comparison is that as these so-called subnotebooks get larger and the prices climb into actual notebook territory, people are going to have a legitimate question: Is the smaller form factor really an advantage when the same money buys a LOT more if I can tolerate a slightly larger chassis?

      As you said, though, the Wind is the clear winner in this contest if MSI can hold the price down. Asus might be able to sell the E1k against full-blown ultraportables at the proposed price points but the genuine subnotebook market the Eee created is about to be bulldozed by competitors.

        • UberGerbil
        • 12 years ago

        “Is the smaller form factor really an advantage when the same money buys a LOT more if I can tolerate a slightly larger chassis?”

        And one legitimate answer is “If I can’t tolerate a larger chassis then all that other stuff is absolutely useless.” We don’t yet know where the chassis tolerance lines fall.

        I agree that the MSI product is a stronger competitor though. Unless you don’t want a spinning disk; then the price starts to climb when you have to pay for an HD you’re not going to use and as well as a replacement SSD.

          • ludi
          • 12 years ago

          That may be one legitimate answer, but sound money says people who have those kinds of needs were already willing to shuck out for devices like the Sony UX and the ultraportables. When you reallygottahaveitnow, you pay.

          I should think that the bulk of the original Eee buyers were looking for something in that size range at a more expendable price. The cream of this new 9″+ crop are rapidly climbing back into notebook territory, at which point the prcie-sensitive folks who made this market happen are going to find the tradeoffs a lot less attractive.

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