AMD resurrects the All-in-Wonder line

The last time an All-in-Wonder card was announced, the company that introduced it was still called ATI and the date on the press release was January 24, 2006. AMD has been focusing on its standalone TV Wonder tuner cards since then, but it resurrected the All-in-Wonder line today with the new All-in-Wonder HD.

Like its predecessors of old, the All-in-Wonder HD couples a Radeon graphics processor with a TV tuner on a single card. According to the official spec sheet, AMD based the card on its Radeon HD 3650—which has a 55nm GPU with 378 million transistors, 120 stream processors, a 128-bit DDR2 memory interface, DirectX 10.1 support, and AMD’s unified video decoder for hardware HD video decode acceleration.

The All-in-Wonder HD. Source: AMD.

The new AIW also brings a TV tuner with support for analog TV, free-to-air HDTV, and ClearQAM unencrypted cable, not to mention hardware MPEG-2 encoding functionality. The card seems tailor-made for home-theater PCs, with a single-slot form factor, DVI and HDMI outputs, and support for Windows Media Center software. AMD also bundles the card with its AMD Live! Explorer and AMD Live! On-Demand software, which supposedly lets users access their video recordings “from any computer with broadband connectivity.” The company even offers an All-in-Wonder HD accessory kit to add “composite video, S-video, stereo audio input and component output.”

Look for the All-in-Wonder HD to hit stores by “late July” in boxes stamped with Diamond and VisionTek logos. AMD says the card will cost $199.

Comments closed
    • Auril4
    • 12 years ago

    During the past 3 to 4 years, I have changed CPUs, motheboards, drives, pretty much everything that I can think of including the case. The only thing that remained constant through all that is my ATI AIW9600 card.
    I’ve been pondering another big upgrade and the biggest thing stopping me was the thought of having to get a t.v. card and a separate video card. I wasn’t too crazy about that and kept putting the upgrade idea on the back burner as a result. For me, this time, procrastination paid off.

    • thermistor
    • 12 years ago

    I had an X700 AIW…FM tuner NEVER worked, video capture DIED after about 60 days. I got a full ATX board for a reason, LOTS-O-SLOTS.

    Gimme a Radeon capture card for a PCI-e X1 slot and I’m a happy camper, especially if it will do analog + digital capture. I will say that the Radeon capture quality was excellent, while it lasted.

    Stacking multiple functionalities on one board is bad news…if the capture goes out, you’re out display, too, unless of course you just want to keep a broken card.

    • Space Bags
    • 12 years ago

    Is this AMD’s new PR strategy? A story every few days, because if so, I LIKE IT NOM NOM NOM.

    • AMDisDEC
    • 12 years ago

    Won’t waste my $$$ on this cheap trick.
    I still have four unsupported AIWs in my junk box.
    Don’t be surprised when it’s not supported under Windows 7.

      • Krogoth
      • 12 years ago

      Please drop the senseless FUD. >_<

      Unsupported? IIRC, the DX9-era AIW still work with Vista.

      You are out of luck with something older under Vista though. XP still does support every AIW since it is introduction.

      Nvidia is far worse in the support department. If you do not have a G8x-era GPU, you are out of luck with driver support.

        • AMDisDEC
        • 12 years ago

        Sorry but AMD pronounced x64 processors, but nowhere can you find 64 bit drivers for AIW.
        It’s ok as long as you’re running 32 bit Win2K or XP.

        No more $$$ dropped on AMD slack tech for me. Luckily, they can count on you, but you don’t drop nearly as much coin as I.

          • Krogoth
          • 12 years ago

          You should really cut back on the booze or whatever is causing long-term memory lost. If that is not the case, then I suggest that you better work on your troll-fu.

          Here is a refresher.

          One of the first things that AMD killed during ATI acquisition was the old AIW line. >_<

          The lack of x64 support for old AIW line is purely a fault from stand-alone ATI. Because at the time, x64 OS were a niche/workstation product. Vista (first mainstream MS OS that used x64) was not even out yet. Nvidia and other video capture guys were there then and still are no better at x64 support.

            • AMDisDEC
            • 12 years ago

            Rather, I think you’d better PICK UP a bottle of booze and leave the Meth alone.
            ATI implemented a non-Microsoft Media Compliant MMC for thei line of AIWs. This is why the AIWs were NEVER approved for Microsoft Media Centers. They were based on proprietary software that actually offered some superior features over Microsoft versions.
            When 64-bit was announced, ATI choose not to redo the MMC. When AMD purchased ATI they decided in their usual display of solid business practice to obsolete the line altogether rather then use resources to update the MMC.
            Following this decision, AMD AIW users were given the worst support anyone would hope to never experience.
            This left AIW users running 64-bit OSs, with $200 AIWs that preformed like straight $100 Radeons sans TV functions. The boards experience many troubles even under 32 bit Vista.
            Learning my lesson after spending many thousands of dollars on AIWs, in the future I’ll wait until NVIDIA develops a follow on to their Personal Cinema Line of tuners and although they don’t work as well as the old AIWs, at least they won’t run away leaving users holding the bag at the 1st sign of trouble.

            • stmok
            • 12 years ago

            Seriously dude, you need to get laid.

            • ssidbroadcast
            • 12 years ago

            lmao, I think it’s hilarious when nerds come to fisticuffs.

      • willyolio
      • 12 years ago

      i’m sorry, if you don’t even know how to download drivers, it’s a PEBKAC, not poor driver support.

        • Metalianman
        • 12 years ago

        Since nVidia releases drivers every 3 or even 4 months it is poor driver support… And even more if the drivers don’t do anything about the cards performance. AMD releases drivers every once-in-a-while and it really has something good to offer every time it does so.

        I have a couple of AMD 3870 x2 and another couple of 8800GT. When somebody asks me which one is the best I go for AMD. Sure the 8800GT is faster but the support from AMD is way too better.

      • Shining Arcanine
      • 12 years ago

      I had an ATI AIW 9700 Pro and driver support for it was terrible. I constantly had problems with it in Windows XP Professsional and I spent hundreds of hours over a few years manually doing things that it should have done automatically.

      Switching to Windows Media Center 2005 Edition and Nvidia’s NVTV hardware, plus a Nvidia graphics card solved all of the problems. My only regret with going with a standalone card was that it was not a Hauppauge card, which has better driver support than Nvidia’s cards.

    • MadManOriginal
    • 12 years ago

    Maybe the people who are jumping on others for noting the lack of inputs as b[

    • gerryg
    • 12 years ago

    Enough people are doing HTPC to play games as much as watch movies, so a 3650 just ain’t gonna cut it. Today, if you ask me, the 3850 level of performance is bare minimum. But that won’t work for HTPC. An underclocked 4850 would probably have good thermals and perform well. I’ve been wondering why they can’t just do an additional card with a crossfire style connector and mount to the motherboard with a PCI or x1 PCI express slot. This would let the user pick the GPU performance level they want.

      • Voldenuit
      • 12 years ago

      r[

      • Voldenuit
      • 12 years ago

      A Hybrid Power system sounds ideal for this.

      IGP for dvd/blu-ray/HD playback (remember that ati IGPs now have UVD(2?)), and a dedicated card for gaming. Now if only ati still made intel chipsets… :p

      Ironically, nv might be a viable option for this setup. Would mean getting a Geforce GPU for this to work, though.

    • FroBozz_Inc
    • 12 years ago

    I wonder just how well the QAM tuner integrates with Vista Media Center.

      • nate011
      • 12 years ago

      It doesn’t. Vista Media Center doesn’t support clear-qam.

      “Clear-QAM is supported in Windows Vista® using ATI Catalyst Media Center™.”

      Not unless they start releasing a patch or workaround to make it work in VMC like avermedia products and hdhomerun.

      ATI has yet to for its 600 and 650 series tuners which support clear-qam and they have been out for several months.

    • Corrado
    • 12 years ago

    This is a fantastic idea. I hope they make a 4850 one so I don’t have to buy a TV for my office.

    • ssidbroadcast
    • 12 years ago

    Nice, but yeah it’s a bit skimpy on ports.

      • Lord.Blue
      • 12 years ago

      again, rtfa.

    • flip-mode
    • 12 years ago

    I hope the 4650 does to the 3650 what the 4850 did to the 3850.

    • paulpod
    • 12 years ago

    Notice a continuation of the scary trend. There is NO video capture capability. So not only does Media Center not support S-video capture but this ATI card does not even have AV inputs. Real nice features when cable goes all digital in US and real nice for people wanting to capture old home video tapes.

    That, coupled with the trend of forcing you to use inefficient, clunky, 10-ft user interfaces while sitting at the PC, has destroyed the fantastic product you had in the original AIW with original Ati MMC. And I bet they have taken away the ability to record lossless, 15Mbs (25Mbs max), mpeg. All HW encoding I have seen is insanely bad compared to MMC 9.xx software encoding.

      • GodsMadClown
      • 12 years ago

      If trimming AV inputs keeps the price down, I’m all for it. I think it’s a perfectly acceptable compromise. Is digitizing an analog source really a common task? I’ve never done it. I think the only analog source that I care about anymore is National Public Radio.

      • vshade
      • 12 years ago

      If the Media Center you are talking about is the one of the windows, it supports s-video(at least in its 2005 iteration with the capturecard that came with my hp notebook). I only didn’t converted old vhs because the vcr was in bad shape

      • Krogoth
      • 12 years ago

      Because just in case, you have not noticed.

      Analog TV broadcast is being phased out in the states next year.

      That is primary reason why it does not have analog inputs. >_<

      Why bother with S-video and composite? Unless you have some precious media formats that are analog in nature. You will not miss it.

        • MadManOriginal
        • 12 years ago

        Yes i[

      • cygnus1
      • 12 years ago

      dude, get the stupid accessory kit and you got your analog in and outs, composite, s-video, and component…

      get some reading comprehension and learn to click on links

      • Lord.Blue
      • 12 years ago

      Lack of reading on your part does not create a scary situation on mine. There is a daughter board that has all the aformentioned connections and then some.

    • TheEmrys
    • 12 years ago

    Fricken A. About time.

      • flybywire
      • 12 years ago

      You can say that again. I had a few AIW cards back in the day and have fond memories of them.

    • Voldenuit
    • 12 years ago

    For a HTPC, they should have passive cooling as the default configuration. SPCR just reviewed a passively cooled 3650 recently (and gave it high praise), so this is not a technical hurdle.

    • wingless
    • 12 years ago

    This is a worthy product. I wonder if they’ll come out with a 4000 series version before the year is out.

      • Voldenuit
      • 12 years ago

      Not with the RV770, at least, not with the heat output at present. I can clearly hear the fan spool up on my Visiontek 4850 under load – getting an Accelero S1 R2 to fix this issue :p

        • Meadows
        • 12 years ago

        There are no heat output issues there. It’s a tiny chip at 55 nm, for chrissakes. It’s a shoddy cooler and bad driver-level fan control only.

          • Voldenuit
          • 12 years ago

          Uh…what?

          It’s a 110W GPU (confirmed by xbitlabs) using a single slott cooler from a much cooler card (3850 was ~75W). Although the cooler has been tweaked slightly, it is still just an aluminum (yup, ALUMINUM*) cooler with a small fan and no heatpipes.

          I can definitely hear the cooler spooling up. I’ve taken a few pains to silence my system, but I’m not a silence freak like the ppl on spcr. What’s most annoying is that the cooler will oscillate between two rpm levels at idle. It’s actually not to bad at base rotation or pure load, but the oscillations make the noise signature irritating.

          * it’s painted copper. I *hate* when ppl do that. X(

          • Voldenuit
          • 12 years ago

          BTW, forgot to mention that the TDP of a core2duo E8400 is 65W, so the 4850 is already nearly twice the heat output of a modern CPU. And don’t forget that HTPCs are often stuffed into small cramped cases with poor internal and peripheral circulation. Keeping TDPs down on a HTPC part is a good idea…

          • Vaughn
          • 12 years ago

          Thank you for spelling that out. Some people are kinda clueless.

        • Forge
        • 12 years ago

        Odd. My Visiontek 4850 has an unquestionably copper cooler. I wonder why yours does not? Are you sure?

          • Deli
          • 12 years ago

          They had AIW with top of the line cards (9700, 9800, x800, x1800, x1900) in the past, those things were hot too, I don’t see why not. These things don’t necessarily have to end up in a HTPC.

          • Voldenuit
          • 12 years ago

          Yup. It’s Aluminum.

          More precisely, it is an Aluminum heatsink with a copper core (where the GPU meets contact). The rest of the heatsink has been painted to look like copper.

          I tested it by nicking the surface of the cooler with a sharp object, and sure enough, under the paint, the cooler was silvery (and soft and light enough that it is most likely aluminum).

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