New MacBooks have aluminum enclosures, Nvidia graphics

Today, Apple finally put an end to weeks of speculation by unleashing its refreshed MacBook and MacBook Pro laptops. First of all, two of the rumors were right: Apple has indeed chosen Nvidia’s integrated graphics chipsets over Intel’s 4-series core-logic offerings, and it has used a new manufacturing process that effectively involves carving the new notebooks out of solid aluminum slabs.

After going over those two points during the launch event, Apple CEO Steve Jobs revealed the updated MacBook Pro. Apple’s new baby looks like a cross between the MacBook Air and the latest iMac, inheriting the former’s keyboard design and mixing in the latter’s 1970s-style display frame.

Apple is offering two models, both with 15.4″ LED-backlit displays: the priciest one costs $2,499 and packs a 2.53GHz Core 2 Duo, 4GB of DDR3 RAM, and a 320GB mechanical hard drive. That notebook has both an Nvidia GeForce 9400M integrated chipset and a discrete GeForce 9600M GT graphics module with 512MB of memory. Other features include a button-free glass trackpad, DisplayPort connectivity, a backlit keyboard, and a sudden-motion sensor. For $1,799, the cheaper MacBook Pro variant delivers a slower 2.4GHz processor, 2GB of DDR3 RAM, a 250GB hard drive, and a GeForce 9600M GT graphics module with only 256MB of memory.

Left: the new MacBook. Right: the new MacBook Pro. Source: Apple.

Many folks will be looking for something a little cheaper, though. To cater to those people, Apple has dropped the price of its previous-gen MacBook to $999, and it’s introduced a pair of next-gen MacBook models that look like smaller versions of the updated MacBook Pros (down to the black display frame and aluminum body). Priced at $1,299, the cheapest of the aluminum MacBooks features a 13.3″ LED-backlit display, a 2GHz Core 2 Duo, GeForce 9400M integrated graphics, 2GB of DDR3 memory, and a 160GB hard drive. For an extra $300, you can get the pricier model with a 2.4GHz processor, 250GB hard drive, and keyboard backlighting. Oh, and an extra $700 will let you upgrade to a 128GB solid-state drive, as well.

Apple had two more surprises. For one, the MacBook Air is getting an upgrade to Nvidia GeForce 9400M integrated graphics, and Apple has tossed in a mini-DisplayPort connector for good measure. Also, the Mac maker has launched an iMac-style 24″ desktop monitor with LED backlighting, a 1920×1200 resolution, built-in stereo speakers, DisplayPort connectivity, and a MagSafe power connector (for charging your MacBook). Those perks don’t come cheap, though: Apple charges $899 for the display.

You should be able to order these new goodies from the Apple Store right now. Both Engadget and Ars Technica have detailed coverage (and photos) of the launch event, too.

Comments closed
      • MadManOriginal
      • 11 years ago

      Those are the type of FUD shots about glossy screens that annoy me.

      1&2: screen is off, who gives a rat’s ass what it looks like when it’s off? You don’t use it that way.
      3-5 (at least, maybe the others too) a window *directly* behind the screen. Worst possible scenario. Any monitor set up like that will have issues really. Anti-glare will get washed out rather than having the reflection.
      6: Yea, I use monitors from a 175 degree viewing angle. Meaningless.
      7-8: Again, the worst possible setup, at least this shows why glossy isn’t the best idea on a laptop though.
      9: A shot under realistic conditions where one has control over the environment finally.

      For a desktop over which one should have control of the room environment most of the anti-glossy FUD is just that. For laptops I can see it being more important because you don’t have control over the environment.

      People should just try them for themselves before letting a biased website opinion dictate their choice.

        • green
        • 11 years ago

        1&2 – you’re right. except for those times when the thing is on and there’s large dark areas on screen (not necessarily black). the amount of reflection you see depends on the environment light vs light produced by the display.

        3 – with a very light background you can see the silhouette of the person at the monitor unless the environment light is very controlled. this means that office lighting is a no go. outdoors is no chance.

        4-8 – yea these ones are FUD. moreover though it indicates the general issue with the glossy screens. they’re essentially glass. and glass reflects a lot. most with a dark backing. but even with a bright backing

        9 – this one is realistic, but generally means very low light conditions. throw fluorescents, desk lamps, 100-120w bulbs, etc. don’t try using on the go.

        overall using a glossy screen the images look very vibrant. but over time the occassional silhouette and subsequent lighting adjustments just wore thin for me.

        that’s a personal preference. ymmv.

    • pogsnet
    • 11 years ago
      • A_Pickle
      • 11 years ago

      Same here. I actually DID buy an Alienware laptop ahead of a MacBook Pro awhile back — the MacBook Pro’s only had X1600’s at the time I was buying, the notebook I got has an X1900. Call me crazy, but I’d bench my X1900 Mobility against these 9600M GT’s any day.

      Then there’s the current crop of Alienware notebooks, which are probably the best effing notebooks on the planet. Illuminated everything with color choices, 8800M GTX’s, multiple hard drives and good battery life. They’re pretty much all-around fantastic, without whimpery graphics.

    • droopy1592
    • 11 years ago

    I wouldn’t touch anything nvidia with a 10 foot pole

      • pogsnet
      • 11 years ago
    • MadManOriginal
    • 11 years ago

    I’m not a laptop person and I do understand how glossy screens could be a problem for laptops. But for non-portables a good glossy screen kicks ass, I finally settled on NEC 20WMGX2 after trying a few popular monitors including Dell 2407. The former is like looking at the image itself not at the screen surface, you look *though* the surface to the image with nothing in between which is how it should be, the latter was like looking at a gritty and grainy version of the same image as if there was a thin layer of sparkly sand coating the screen; and that was supposed to be a good monitor?

    The funny thing about reflections is that CRTs had them too 😉 (anti-glare coatings not withstanding, they never worked 100%) and many people still consider them the reference. It’s all personal preference in the end but I wonder how many people have tried both types before going with the FUD-ish old bit that many websites used to throw about by showing reflections on a glossy monitor that was turned off (because of course turned off is the way a monitor is used.)

    • Jive
    • 11 years ago

    Some of you guys are bashing Apple glossy screen without ever using one (Apple store doesn’t count).
    Im on a year old MBP glossy LED screen, and it is one of the BEST and brightest screens i have ever seen used (I also have a 2007WPF on my desktop, so i too like quality).
    I always use my laptop near two large windows, and i never ever have problems with reflections. As opposed to my girlfriends Dell inspiron with a glossy screen, she can’t stand it and hates her laptop, and is infinitely jealous of my laptop.

      • UberGerbil
      • 11 years ago

      That’s kind of funny — just last week I watched a guy at my local coffee shop trying to get his Mac into a position he liked. He tried seats on 3 sides of his table, with a fair bit of fidgeting at each, before he was happy. Maybe he was especially finicky, and the morning sun through the windows make it is hard to find a good spot in that place, but I did notice his Mac had a glossy screen.

    • YeuEmMaiMai
    • 11 years ago

    waits for reports of Nvidia’s core locgic sucking ass on the mac side

    • crazybus
    • 11 years ago

    The lack of Firewire or eSATA or an ExpressCard slot on the MacBook is disappointing. 1394a (at least of the 4-pin variety) is more or less standard in notebooks these days. It’s unfortunate that Apple, once champion of the interface, has dropped it. Clearly they have market segmentation thoughts in mind.

    IMO the $2000 entry point of the MacBook Pro is too much for features that are readily available on machines less than half the cost. Come on Apple, even Sony has SD card slots in their notebooks these days. Additionally, I’m sure there are people out (like me) who don’t really want the size of notebook that a 15.4″ screen demands.

    Sorry, but there’s no “MUST BUY” from me, even if I could afford it.

      • adisor19
      • 11 years ago

      Exactly my thoughts! They only took out Firewire for market segmentation. Many Pro users out there need Firewire for audio and video editing and would gladly take the cheaper and more portable 13″ version instead of the 15″.

      I am, like many hundreds of Apple users, pissed about this decision. One would only need to have a look at the revolt on the macrumors forums to see how bad things are..

      Bad, BAD Apple !! 🙁

      Adi

    • A_Pickle
    • 11 years ago

    These look nice and all, but…

    …they still don’t have a built-in card reader. That’s retarded.

    • ReAp3r-G
    • 11 years ago

    all aluminum construct…yummy! 0.0

    • Thresher
    • 11 years ago

    I am disappointed by the prices. The market is not at the $2000+ level, although there is some market there. The vast majority of the market is between $600 and $1200, at which Apple barely registers. I do think they are now offering much more for the money than they were before, but it’s still disappointing that they don’t have a lower entry point.

    I suspect that with all the economic tribulation occurring, they will have to at some point introduce something more in the mass market simply to maintain some of the market share they’ve gained.

    Lastly, can anyone explain to me why I should want a glass trackpad? This seems more like a liability than a plus and I don’t see that it offers any functionality that couldn’t have been added to a regular pad.

      • Captain Ned
      • 11 years ago

      About the trackpad:

      Am I the only person in the world who finds the IBM-style stick preferable to a trackpad?

      I’d gladly go without a trackpad so that the keyboard could be much closer to the front edge of the unit, making it more like a real keyboard.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 11 years ago

        not at all a realistic request in a portable (unless there’s a touch screen like HP’s new baby), though I understand where you’re coming from.

        • ludi
        • 11 years ago

        YOU ARE NOT ALONE, COMRADE!

        When I got my first (used) ThinkPad nearly ten years ago, it had no trackpad at all and I though The Stick would take forever to accommodate. Instead, I was completely comfortable with it in a couple days, and it turned out that the proportional force mechanism was faster and far more precise than any trackpad while causing less wrist strain. Not only do you NOT have to sweep your fingers repeatedly across the trackpad, you don’t even have to move your hand much away from the asdfjk; position.

        • A_Pickle
        • 11 years ago

        Well, personally… I like a well-done trackpad better than those nubs, but those are pretty cool too. Actually, my biggest complaint with them is button placement — none of those nubs have properly placed buttons for quick moving and clicking — if they did, they’d totally be the most kickass laptop mousing interface.

        That said, heh, this is an article about the MacBook Pro. Do you REALLY think Apple, /[<_[

        • eitje
        • 11 years ago

        i’m a big fan of the nub mouse.

        • moog
        • 11 years ago

        I’m with you on this, nubs are easier to navigate with.

        • StashTheVampede
        • 11 years ago

        Bumping the truth, seriously. I can use both, but the Thinkpad “nub” is pretty damned good compared to the Dell “nub”. Something about it makes it very fast to use.

        • UberGerbil
        • 11 years ago

        You’re not alone. There’s a reason why laptops are still made with the nub, and a lot of business class models offer /[

        • mako
        • 11 years ago

        Trackpoint = win.

        • Anonymous Coward
        • 11 years ago

        Yeah at work I use a Lenovo Thinkpad with nub all day. The nub works great but that jumbo trackpad of Apple’s is probably the best thing of all.

        Sigh, too bad about what they did to the screen.

    • p645n
    • 11 years ago

    As with previous new model releases you’ll find the real deal is the Apple Stores refurbs where the previous gen’s models are going for really sweet prices — up to about $1000 off MacBook Pro’s.

    • StashTheVampede
    • 11 years ago

    Much love on the 24″ LED screen. Look at the Samsung competitor and it’s over 2k, doesn’t have speakers or webcam!

    • SNM
    • 11 years ago

    Price FAIL. 🙁
    I mean, I love the new features, but upping the price of entry by $200 to reach them? Low.

    A $1000 model is nice, I guess, but by this point even with the lower price that’s a pretty steep Apple tax, especially since all the new programs are going to be written assuming you have a multi-touch trackpad. If Apple wants to keep around their old model for a lower-cost product they should at least have given it “real feature” parity. 🙁

    • rivieracadman
    • 11 years ago

    #28 I love shinny monitors because colors seem more saturated and correct. However I’ll be the first one to admitt that I can’t use one in my home office because I’m surrounded by large windows.

    I really wished for a $899 Macbook. My old powerbook G4 will have to wait until Apple decides to allow us to use 4 GB+ (I would like to see 8GB) of ram in our notebooks so I can replace my workstation. I just can’t justify both, even if my powerbook fails me. I do like the change to a better graphics subsystem though.

      • Anonymous Coward
      • 11 years ago

      I agree that the colors look better with gloss, in fact its wonderful, except for being reflective. 🙂 I liked how they used to offer the option of either.

    • Hattig
    • 11 years ago

    I love Apple hardware, but all they’ve done here is create a new boutique laptop.

    MacBook Pro
    MacBook Pro Lite

    Too expensive.
    Even the cheap plastic MacBook went up £20 in the UK. No price drop for us. Screw that.

    In terms of laptop body, this is probably the most robust you’ll get in that form factor ever. The trackpad is going to be very nice as well. But even I can’t justify that money for a replacement laptop.

    • PRIME1
    • 11 years ago

    l[

    • herothezero
    • 11 years ago

    Who the hell at Apple is so in love with themselves that they sincerely believe people actually want glossy monitors in laptops and iMacs?

    It’s just retarded.

      • adisor19
      • 11 years ago

      Honestly, it’s not so bad on the iPhone.. however on a laptop, just like you, i have a hard time believing the hype of glossy screens.. Maybe I’ll pay a visit to an Apple store and check it out if indeed increasing the LED back light, will combat the glare as SJ and company claims.

      Adi

      • A_Pickle
      • 11 years ago

      I heart glossy screens. Non-glossies piss me off.

    • UberGerbil
    • 11 years ago

    DisplayPort is a packetized protocol, so converting to DVI/HDMI isn’t a trivial connector change: you need active electronics to consume the packets and drive the TDMS signals (or vice versa). “Dual Mode” Displayport exists, but that merely brings the DVI signals out to the connector on separate pins, and I doubt Apple has done this (especially on a “mini” connector).

    By going DisplayPort only, Apple avoids paying the Silicon Image tax (saving them a buck or two on COGS for the monitor).

      • crazybus
      • 11 years ago

      I was not aware how DisplayPort handled the conversion/transmission of TMDS signals from DVI/HDMI, just that it was supposedly possible to pass it through. Whether or not the monitor can actually function with a TMDS signal is another question…probably not.

      What I was envisioning was something along the lines of what’s mentioned at the bottom of this page (http://www.bit-tech.net/bits/2007/10/22/displayport_a_look_inside/4), a bidirectional conversion dongle. I haven’t actually seen one on the market yet. I imagine that there would have to be some sort of logic in there, and in the case of DisplayPort<->VGA, a DAC.

        • UberGerbil
        • 11 years ago

        Yeah, I haven’t seen anything like that yet either. It’s certainly possible, but it’s not a trivial bit of engineering like a dumb pin-converting dongle.

    • Anonymous Coward
    • 11 years ago

    The black borders look crappy and it appears that they no longer offer the matte finish anywhere except the old 17″ model. Are they selling toys to idiots, or real computers? I write this from the last revision of 17″ PB G4, which I like a lot. Happy to see the old 17″ hangs on a bit longer.

    I guess the graphics boost makes the MB Air more interesting in comparison to its competitors, which as far as I know, are all running Intel graphics.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 11 years ago

      Gizmodo says the 17″ will get refreshed as well. In the Q&A afterwards they said they’re going all glossy and theyr’e compensating for reflections by pushing more light through the backlight.

      I don’t know if that actually works or not; I’ve never used a glossy display.

        • Anonymous Coward
        • 11 years ago

        The drooling masses win this battle. Its like fighting zombies I guess.

        Muuuuustt haaavvee shiiinnnyyyy…..

          • derFunkenstein
          • 11 years ago

          wtf? I give a factual reply and you call names. Surprise!

            • Anonymous Coward
            • 11 years ago

            Are you the drooling masses? In any case I’m under no obligation to match your level of factuality.

            I definitely blame the drooling masses for making shiny screens the norm. I don’t think I’ve ever met anyone who actually liked them.

            • derFunkenstein
            • 11 years ago

            no, what I’m saying is we should at least let someone look at these things in person before declaring a loss for humanity or whatever over-hyperbolized nonsense you come up with.

            • Anonymous Coward
            • 11 years ago

            Glossy screens are evil, I don’t care how many lumens they put behind them. People only buy them because they are shiny. Compared for one second side by side, shiny looks better. So the market turns, guided by drooling masses.

            OK I’ll admit these people are, technically speaking, not drooling.

            • Usacomp2k3
            • 11 years ago

            I like my ‘shiny display’ *shrug*

            • Anonymous Coward
            • 11 years ago

            OK I admit that informed buyers also sometimes like shiny displays. What we really want is the choice, eh?

            • MadManOriginal
            • 11 years ago

            The choice is to buy a different monitor that isn’t an Apple brand.

            • ludi
            • 11 years ago

            I also like my shiny display…in a laptop. The idea of shiny + brighter backlight is to enhance the contrast and color saturation for a fraction of the cost of going to a better LCD display tech. For a desktop, IMO the matte finish is better because you generally don’t have as many options for moving the display and room furniture.

            But yeah, “shiny” does have marketing appeal. Here at work, we recently hired several new people and when our IT guy ordered a new round of workstations, he found that the standard Samsung 19″ monitor we use had changed model numbers. Turns out the new units are functionally the exact same display, but the new model has a shiny black bezel with a slight curve in the surface instead of a rectangular flat-black model like the old ones. Some of the engineers were commenting on “How nice the new displays looked compared to the old ones”. Downright comic.

            • MadManOriginal
            • 11 years ago

            That’s funny, I feel the exact opposite, that mobile displays are more prone to having problems due to reflections and lighting conditions than desktop. To me a desktop display is in a stable environment than can be more easily controlled and altered for the better, not the other way around :shrug:

            Maybe the engineers meant the overall display design looks nicer, or are you certain they meant the actual display picture?

            • ludi
            • 11 years ago

            It was an “ooh, shiny!” response when they saw the new systems being commissioned. It wasn’t an in-depth side-by-side analysis or anything like that, it just illustrates the point that shiny = sells.

            Re: placement — Windows, room configuration, and sig-others place major layout constraints on how a room can be organized, particularly desks and other furniture. If a window or light fixture is in a bad spot for creating reflective glare, you’re often hosed. With a laptop, you can always change chairs or rotate the one you’re in.

    • crazybus
    • 11 years ago

    Hidden in this update is the fact that the MacBook Air finally gets a 45nm processor.

    Bold move though making the new 24″ monitor mini-DisplayPort only. I wonder if it will take a DVI signal through an appropriate adapter.

      • adisor19
      • 11 years ago

      That and the fact that the HD is now SATA instead of IDE 😀

      Oh Yeaaaah ! Time to shop around for a FAST 1.8″ SSD

      Adi

        • UberGerbil
        • 11 years ago

        Do you actually own an Air? Are you actually going to buy the new one? Or is this all fantasizing?

          • adisor19
          • 11 years ago

          I’m going to buy the new one indeed. The old one had a few shortcomings that were just addressed today :

          – Lack of SATA and thus lack of upgrade ability
          – Sad integrated graphics
          – 2GB max ram

          Well it’s 2 out of 3 that have been corrected. Too bad about that 2GB max ram :s

          Adi

            • derFunkenstein
            • 11 years ago

            send me your Macbook then, eh?

            • adisor19
            • 11 years ago

            It’s a MacBook Pro actually 😉

            And with a bit of luck, i plan on handing it down to my GF or something.. it still has 1.1 years of Apple Care left in it hehe

            Adi

        • no51
        • 11 years ago

        Maybe I’ll get one through my Uncle’s employee discount.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 11 years ago

      Also hidden (as in, I just noticed) is that the entry level Macbook also has a DVD-RW. Previously, the entry-level Macbook had just a combo drive.

    • derFunkenstein
    • 11 years ago

    Heh, I just Craigslisted my Mini. Someone drive here and buy it so I can go shopping.

    Too bad about the price, though. I was really moist for a Macbook at $800-900 with nVidia’s integrated graphics. I’d be keeping the Mini as a server if a pair of these wasn’t going to cost me $2600.

      • A_Pickle
      • 11 years ago

      nVidia’s integrated graphics? I guess I’ve only seen them on Vista, but MAN do they ever suck there. It’s probably a whole different magilla in OS X, though.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 11 years ago

        Compared to Intel’s integrated crap, it’s a huge step up. Remember, I’m not playing games on my computer; I just want something that accelerates the GUI well.

          • A_Pickle
          • 11 years ago

          Again, in Vista, I’m not so sure. Intel’s stuff runs Aero just fine — Nvidia’s 6150, 7000, 7100, and 7150 do not. The 8200 does a little better, admittedly, and I would think the MacBooks are based on that.

            • ssidbroadcast
            • 11 years ago

            Actually the Macbooks are based off the GeForce 9400M. Please learn to read, kthxbye.

            • thecoldanddarkone
            • 11 years ago

            The 8300 based boards have 16 shaders@1500 and a core of 500… I seriously doubt the integrated 9400 is going to be much (maybe not all) faster.

            • thecoldanddarkone
            • 11 years ago

            Well look at that I was wrong (which is cool). The 9400m integrated looks to be 50% faster than the 8300.

            • derFunkenstein
            • 11 years ago

            uhm, he’s OK, actually. I was dreaming of *just* the integrated graphics in an ever cheaper Macbook. Like what they kept except with just the 9100M or whatever they call the mGPU in the chipset.

            • A_Pickle
            • 11 years ago

            g[<*[

            • ssidbroadcast
            • 11 years ago

            You:
            q[

            • Bombadil
            • 11 years ago

            The Apple faithful get stuck with second best technology again? It’s too bad AMD latest IGPs won’t be showing up on an Intel platform. I’d bet the 9400M = 8200/8300 IGP maybe a little better due to the direct connection to DDR3. The AMD versions of nVidia’s IGPs are fine with Vista. The Intel platform 7xx0 IGPs were limited by single channel DDR2.

            • adisor19
            • 11 years ago

            What ?! the MacBook Pro gets the 9600M GT. And as far as “integrated” chipsets go, the non Pro version gets the brand spaning new 9400M integrated chipset. How is this second grade exactly ?!

            Adi

            • no51
            • 11 years ago

            Based on nvidia’s recent track record of renaming stuff, might as well call it a GTX 180M and no one would be the wiser.

            • Bombadil
            • 11 years ago

            9600M GT = 9500GT = 8600GT = 32 shaders
            9400M = 16 shaders (edit)

            The 9600M GT = slow and obsolete. It is basicallly the same GPU as in old Mac Book Pros. The 9600M GT has about one forth the performance of a 8800M GTX and being generous might be worth $30. The 9400M actually sounds pretty good for an IGP, but even if Hybrid SLI scaled perfectly the combination will still be slower than a desktop 9600GT.

    • indeego
    • 11 years ago

    One of my bosses saw this and is getting it. First Mac ever.

    NeXt–>NT4–>W2K–>XP–>OSX. heh, kinda funny to see it come full circleg{<.<}g

      • StashTheVampede
      • 11 years ago

      I came … full circle:
      Apple OS circa 1985 -> DOS 5.0 -> Windows 3.0/1/.11 -> Win95 -> Win95OSR2 -> Win98 -> Win98/NT4 -> Win2k -> WinXP -> OSX

      OSX hit me circa 10.3.X days — I bought a PowerMac. I still use Windows (plenty of time), but OSX does most of what I need and then some (more and more time connected to f’ing linux boxes).

        • derFunkenstein
        • 11 years ago

        I went around and around in circles. Apple II -> Commodore VIC20 -> DOS/Win 3.1 -> Mac OS 7.5 -> Win 95 through XP -> OS X around 10.3.x as well

          • blastdoor
          • 11 years ago

          Apple II -> macOS 7-9 -> win2k -> OSX.

            • A_Pickle
            • 11 years ago

            Windows 3.1 > Windows 95 > Windows 98SE > Windows ME > Windows XP > Brief flirt with Ubuntu > Dual boot of Mac OS X 10.4.5 and Windows Vista Build 5384 > Windows Vista

            No circles here. Just an occasional speedbump… or is it an occasional small mammal?

    • DukeNukem
    • 11 years ago

    So much for having an affordable and decent MacBook come out :-\

    Can’t say I’m surprised though.

      • willyolio
      • 11 years ago

      how can apple maintain its image of higher price for higher quality if they release a low-cost notebook?

      not to mention the lowered profit margins.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 11 years ago

        well they DID drop the price on the entry-level Macbook, so the margins HAVE to be lower, right?

          • willyolio
          • 11 years ago

          well, that’s just a clearance sale.

            • adisor19
            • 11 years ago

            No, not really. They’re keeping it as a low level priced laptop sort of like they had the Emac back in the day.

            Adi

            • derFunkenstein
            • 11 years ago

            Per Gizmodo, Jobs said this is a new generation in addition to the white plastic model, implying that it’ll be around for a while.

        • DukeNukem
        • 11 years ago

        $1000 is not low cost for any notebook.

          • A_Pickle
          • 11 years ago

          Certainly not low cost for a notebook lacking ANY discrete graphics solution.

      • eitje
      • 11 years ago

      Going from $1300 to $2500 in ~$300 leaps is at least consistent.

    • DukeNukem
    • 11 years ago

    Accidental double post. Delete this.

    • UberGerbil
    • 11 years ago

    The glass touchpads are multi-touch, so you can iPhone addicts can pinch and swipe like Rainman…

    • Usacomp2k3
    • 11 years ago

    IMHO, that monitor is really limiting it’s potential to pretty much being Mac-only. What a shame.

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