Intel talks Core i7 schedule, shows working Atom SoC

At its latest developer forum in Taipei, Taiwan, Intel took the opportunity to shed light on several major upcoming products. The most interesting of those might well be Moorestown—the system-on-a-chip (SoC) successor to Atom—which Intel demonstrated in a working system for the first time ever at the event. Whereas Atom needs a discrete chipset to work, Moorestown fuses both components into a single chip:

Moorestown comprises of an SOC, codenamed “Lincroft,” which integrates the 45nm processor, graphics, memory controller and video encode/decode onto a single chip and an I/O hub codenamed “Langwell”, which supports a range of I/O ports to connect with wireless, storage, and display components in addition to incorporating several board level functions. [Anand Chandrasekher, Intel Senior VP and General Manager of the Ultra Mobility Group] stated that Intel is on track to reduce Moorestown platform idle power by more than 10x compared to the first-generation MIDs based on the Intel Atom processor.

Intel doesn’t plan to have Moorestown out until 2009 or 2010, though. According to Intel’s press release, Chandrasekher said Moorestown “will be a catalyst for exciting and innovative developments that will extend the full Internet experience into the smartphone space with the Communication MID.” In non-marketing-speak, that sounds like the SoC might make its way into cell phones.

What about Core i7? Intel said at the event that its next-gen desktop CPUs will come out next month, and it spoke about future derivatives. The Nehalem architecture will debut first with Core i7 in desktops and with Nehalem-EP in “efficient performance” servers, but Intel will follow up in the second half of next year with four new variants: Nehalem-EX for the “expandable server market segment” and Havendale, Lynnfield, Auburndale, and Clarksfield for consumer desktops and notebooks.

We heard about these desktop and mobile variants from the rumor mill in July and August. If those early reports are accurate, Lynnfield will be a cheaper quad-core desktop CPU, while Havendale will fill in as the dual-core derivative. Auburndale and Clarksfield will both show up in notebooks, and the former will have an integrated graphics core. Folks in Asia have already caught pictures of Lynnfield engineering samples, too.

Comments closed
    • d0g_p00p
    • 11 years ago

    I hope this pushes the price down on current netbooks once this comes out.

    • bcronce
    • 11 years ago

    “Current Atom platform consumption is in the single digit watt range”

    actually, the platform is EVERYTHING. The atom “platform” is actually worse for idle power consumption than the Via whatever competing cpu. It’s the chipset that’s eating all the power, not the cpu. The Atom has really low power consumption, but the chipset blows.

      • UberGerbil
      • 11 years ago

      Right. Which is why I was talking about the platform.

    • MadManOriginal
    • 11 years ago

    The SoC Atom sounds far more interesting for all applications than the current CPU/945 setup which is really bad because of the chipset, and even sounds better than Atom+Poulsboro. Netbooks and nettops based on a SoC Atom will be great little low-power devices.

    • darryl
    • 11 years ago

    what a double-posting rookie I am!! take my picture off the milk cartons!

    • UberGerbil
    • 11 years ago

    Current Atom platform consumption is in the single digit watt range. A 10x consumption will get it just under a watt. They need to get down below 250mW — in ordinary use, not best case — to talk seriously about design wins in phones (which have other demands on their batteries — just ask any iPhone Pandora user). So they may be getting close, and they certainly could make more progress before it ships, but I expect it’ll be the second generation or later of Moorestown before we see “Intel Inside” a smartphone.

      • tfp
      • 11 years ago

      There are already smart phones with Intel Inside, they are ARM processors.

        • UberGerbil
        • 11 years ago

        ARM isn’t Intel. There are lots of phones using ARM-derived chips, but those have nothing to do with Intel.

        Intel acquired the StrongARM design from DEC, and that later became XScale. XScale is mostly found in network appliances and other industrial settings but it does show up in some pocket PCs. The only phones I’m aware of using XScale are the Treo and some Blackberries.

          • tfp
          • 11 years ago

          I know ARM isn’t Intel but they have made ARM (StrongARM) based processors and they are in phones, some of them smartphones. There is a family of WM based smarphones with Xscale chips in them.

            • UberGerbil
            • 11 years ago

            Fair enough. I admit I was thinking x86 when I wrote that, since that was the only processor line to which “Intel Inside” was ever applied.

      • ludi
      • 11 years ago

      I’ve got a 8+ year old photochop showing “Intel inside” on a cellular hanset, with a giant heatpipe cooler dangling out the back and a pair of jumper cables looped over to a car battery. I should go find that thing again.

        • d0g_p00p
        • 11 years ago

        yes please do and post the link here.

        • ImSpartacus
        • 11 years ago

        That’s funny. Post it.

    • darryl
    • 11 years ago

    a guy could spend his life waiting for the …zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz…***huh
    ?*** what was i saying?

      • SecretMaster
      • 11 years ago

      What /[

        • Meadows
        • 11 years ago

        He probably had networking issues and never saw himself successfully send the first one.

        Other than that, I have no idea what he’s going on about.

    • darryl
    • 11 years ago

    a guy could spend his life waiting or just…zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz
    ***huh?*** what was I saying?

    • Meadows
    • 11 years ago

    Sooner or later they’ll run out of “-field” and “-dale” names, then they’ll be in trouble.

      • masaki
      • 11 years ago

      Yeah, like F1 courses.

      • Zymergy
      • 11 years ago

      Like “Cloverfield” and “Chip-n-Dale”? Or what about “Marshall(Field)s” and “Steakan(dale)”… I am sure they can think of other too…
      Of course, they could go with ES Prototype 101 CPU.. you know.. for the T-800 series…. LOL

      • StashTheVampede
      • 11 years ago

      Aren’t all of the codenames from lakes and rivers in the Pacific Northwest area (specifically, Oregon)?

        • ludi
        • 11 years ago

        They’ve been on an Oregon kick since at least the late PIII days (Tualatin). And given the topography of Oregon, they’ve probably got a long ways to go yet.

          • echo_seven
          • 11 years ago

          IIRC Intel’s first oregon code name was “Klamath”, for the very first Pentium II’s. Before that they used the “P” code names:

          P54C = original Pentium
          P55C = Pentium MMX

          • UberGerbil
          • 11 years ago

          For designs coming out of Intels’ Hillsboro facilities. Their Israeli design group uses geographic names from their area (Banias, Dothan) and the Itanium group goes outside Oregon (Tukwilla, Montecito)

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