AMD postpones ‘Fusion’ to 2011, rethinks mobile roadmap

Say goodbye to Shrike and hello to Caspian, Conesus, Champlain, and Geneva. AMD showed its latest desktop and notebook roadmap during its ongoing Financial Analyst Day presentation this morning, and it looks like the company has fundamentally rethought its plans for the mobile space.

You might recall the Shrike notebook platform AMD announced at its 2007 Financial Analyst Day almost a year ago. Shrike was supposed to arrive in 2009 and bring Swift, the first ‘Fusion’ processor that would feature x86 cores with a graphics processor in the same package. Although AMD has since kicked off a new marketing campaign around the concept of fusion, it has scrapped Shrike from its latest roadmap and postponed the arrival of CPU-GPU hybrids until 2011.

According to AMD, the real sweet spot for “accelerated processing units” that couple GPU and CPU cores will be at the 32nm node, where it expects to deliver optimal performance per watt. In the meantime, the company has four new mobile CPUs in the pipeline.

The first two of those chips, Conensus and Caspian, will both come out next year and feature two cores and DDR2 memory support. The former will debut in the second half of 2009 in a new Yukon platform aimed at ultra-portable notebooks and “mini-notebooks,” while the Caspian-powered Tigris platform will follow in the second half of the year and target mainstream laptops.

AMD will follow up in 2010 with Geneva and Champlain. Both CPUs will support DDR3 memory, and Champlain will deliver four processing cores to mainstream notebooks. Like Conesus, Geneva will hit ultraportables and mini-notebooks in a ball-grid-array package, meaning it should be soldered directly onto system boards. Since both Conesus and Geneva will feature two cores and slip into ultraportables, AMD may be targeting them at Intel’s ultra-low-voltage Core 2 processors rather than Atom-based systems.

AMD has also given the public the first glimpse of its 32nm roadmap. The new Bulldozer architecture will finally hit desktops in 2011 with Orochi, a 32nm enthusiast CPU with more than four cores, over 8MB of cache, and DDR3 memory support. AMD talked about Bulldozer in the summer of 2007, saying it would see the light of day in 2009 as part of Falcon GPU-CPU chimeras and Sandtiger server processors with up to 16 cores. The architecture mysteriously disappeared from subsequent roadmaps, though, and our queries about it were left unanswered.

On the enterprise side of things, the server roadmap AMD showed this morning was the same one it revealed way back in May. AMD still plans Istanbul, Magny-Cours, and Sao Paulo server CPUs over the next couple of years. You can probably count on Bulldozer-based server chips following in 2011 around the same time as Orochi, but we didn’t hear AMD say anything about that.

Comments closed
    • rivieracadman
    • 11 years ago

    This entire roadmap speaks of rebuilding and solidifying AMDs’ market share. I’m glad they held off Fusion until it’s solid, and cost effective to produce. Focus on recovering your core markets first, and build your best products over time behind closed doors. There are several successful buisnesses that follow this model. ( Apple for one )

    • snowboard9
    • 11 years ago

    Wow. Another roadmap change from AMD !

    I’m starting to worry when they change roadmaps as frequently as I do my laundry,

      • eitje
      • 11 years ago

      gotta do something with all of the dirty underwear.

    • Jigar
    • 11 years ago

    AMD’s Fusion has become a big Con-Fusion…

      • xastware
      • 11 years ago

      while it’s run under con-artists initiative it’s not so surprisingly too see more and more of new confusion sets from damn

    • maroon1
    • 11 years ago

    So, AMD will make the fisrt 32nm processor on 2011 ?!! As far as I know Intel will make 32nm Nehalem on late 2009 !

    Based on this roadmap, I can say that Intel will kick AMD’s ass for a long long time. Thats if we assume that AMD release their products on time. If delay their products again as they always do, then we need to say bye bye to AMD

      • sdack
      • 11 years ago

      This is not surprising. Intel always had the more advanced fabrication process on their side. It did not always help them to stay in the lead however.

        • xastware
        • 11 years ago

        well thy must stay a far leap ahead now when ther’re the only one with their fully owned fabs to keep pushing technology further! why do you think we see the whoe bunch of crappy x86 incarnations on the places they don’t belong atom vs. arm (superior and few gens ahead), stinkybee- in order chip vs. vliw multi pipeline chips …. fabs cost more’n’more and with such quick jumps with product shrinkage and cutting down in really new tech r&d left us with more and more junk chips floating around doing nothing.
        and it’s nice initiative they try to persuade us in it that they with process shrinkage consume less energy instead both of them damn & intel do the both things at the same time power plane optimisations & investing in new production process. well then they’d loose bragging rights with any pebble they brought to us with their SHINY SUPERIOR NEW PRODUCT

          • sdack
          • 11 years ago

          Heh, this reminds me of the time when /[

            • kitsunegari
            • 11 years ago

            LOL

            that was pretty good ๐Ÿ˜‰

    • stmok
    • 11 years ago

    I don’t mind this roadmap…I’m not upgrading until 2011 anyway! ๐Ÿ˜€

    • Usacomp2k3
    • 11 years ago

    Once again, slow on the new DDR train.

      • UberGerbil
      • 11 years ago

      Smartly stepping on board at about the point where the DDR3 downward curve and the DDR2 rebounding curve cross, I expect. Just like they did with the SDR-DDR transition. Seems like good planning to maximize the perf/total-system-cost argument in their favor. DDR3 will offer more perf/watt eventually, but the initial cost wins out for now.

      • mutarasector
      • 11 years ago

      Agreed. Since AM3 Phenoms won’t arrive till 2010, it looks as though RD890 is pushed back (along w/SB800 southbridges). I guess we’ll be seeing more mobo makers squeezing in another round of updated 790FX mobos paired up/updated with an SB750. AFAIK, only Asus, Foxconn, and Jetway have 790FX/SB750 mobos, but I’d like to see what MSI and Gigabyte will be offering shortly.

    • ludi
    • 11 years ago

    Duke Fusion Forever.

      • ssidbroadcast
      • 11 years ago

      come get some?

    • AMDisDEC
    • 11 years ago

    2011 is a looooong way off for AMD

      • xastware
      • 11 years ago

      Not now when they get rid of their own fab that was mainly under ecb subvention, nice small balls guy’s play with euro tax payers money under fp of technological advancement or rural europe.

        • ztrand
        • 11 years ago

        1) proofread your posts before posting them

        2) The european central bank is not in the business of subsidising anything. The commission or parliament might give tax rebates and such, but so do the most governments including the american.

    • Chillectric
    • 11 years ago

    I hope they introduce SSE5 sooner, then

      • UberGerbil
      • 11 years ago

      They’re flying in the face of Intel’s AVX with that. And, based on the specs, AVX is slightly to significantly better. But it doesn’t even matter: if Intel and AMD introduce competing SIMD extensions that both do essentially the same thing, Intel will win by dint of better developer support. This is like 3DNow vs SSE (and not like x86-x64 for which Intel had no competitive alternative).

      The innovation* I’d like to see AMD push ahead with is their IOMMU. But that’s not as sexy (especially to gaming enthusiasts who aren’t running VMs).

      * To forestall yet another tiresome “It’s not an innovation because X did it first” thread let me just say I’m using “innovation” in a very limited way to denote adding a feature to the x86 space, completely independent of its previous and ongoing existence in other contexts.

        • Scrotos
        • 11 years ago

        I only took issue with that one i7 quote; I’m not going to rabidly dog people about “innovation” or, say, GB versus GiB. Hehehe.

    • Vasilyfav
    • 11 years ago

    So AMD won’t be able to catch up on the tech process like the news said they will by the end of 2009. Why am I not surprised in the least?

    • jdaven
    • 11 years ago

    Another question: According to Anandtech’s pictures of AMD’s slides, 32 nm will be ready for production in 2010 but there are not products scheduled for 2011. What are they going to do? Sit on that 32 nm technology for a whole year. I think there is more in the 2009/2010 (dual cores, 32 nm transition) than the overly simplified roadmap shows.

      • LiamC
      • 11 years ago

      Hmmm,

      for the last couple of transistions (90nm, 65nm, 45nm), AMD has said, “we are closing the gap to Intel”, “six months behind but we will ramp more quickly”. And guess what? So far they have not delivered. Gee, 45nm was supposed to debut in January this year according to some sources. My 10K overview is that they are 15 months behind and that gap appears to be growing.

      As well, the performance on 65nm just wasn’t there versus 90nm and we don’t know how 45nm is going to pan out. AMD/IBMs process is also lacking some of the enhancements that Intel are touting (though not being a process engineer, I can’t say how well high-K metal gates will translate to a SOI process versus “bulk” Si (note the apostrophes).

      The AMD corporate spinmeisters are touting the 32nm process real soon now and even talking up 22nm. I’m sorry, but AMD are all out of credibility

        • xastware
        • 11 years ago

        well you misinterprets the facts, all of them have testing productions before they flood the market with chipcrap. and Intel’s 45nm mass market debut was timed with deliverance for Easter 2008, and in fact they didn’t flood the market properly some caused with lower enthusiasme fo adoption of dying lga775 market & more of 2nd world depression so they reorganize themselves to deliver as much as they could cheap to produce with high market cap of crappy atoms. And 8 month later amd enter the market with 45nm server chips (https://techreport.com/discussions.x/15888) as usually since introduction of K8

    • jdaven
    • 11 years ago

    So are 2 Core Deneb processors for the desktop completely canceled?

    • slaimus
    • 11 years ago

    This is probably a result of the fab spin-off plan. The fab division will not have ability to make GPUs until 32nm when it is bulk silicon. Maybe the Strike platform was going to be made at TSMC with SOI, but now that AMD fab and TSMC are competitors, the deal was off.

    • UberGerbil
    • 11 years ago

    Completely trivial and content-free aside, but:
    Anybody see any coherence to AMD’s codenames (akin to the F1 tracks on the server side)? I realize they’re probably coming from different groups and maybe only have some internal rationale within those groups, but I’m not really even seeing evidence of that.

    Lakes: Geneva, Champlain, Ontario, and Caspian (sort of)
    Towns: Liano (Italy), Conesus (NY)
    Snake/dragon/mythical thing: Orochi
    Propos — apropos…nothing?

      • Xylker
      • 11 years ago

      I am pretty sure it is Llano, here in Texas…

      ยง[<http://www.llanotx.com/<]ยง

        • UberGerbil
        • 11 years ago

        That sounds plausible. And looking at that slide carefully, I think you’re right: it’s a lower case L not an i.

        Do they pronounce that the Spanish way — /[

          • Xylker
          • 11 years ago

          Most of the names in this area of the country are butchered. In Austin there was a fairly large German settlement and words like Koenig and Mueller are routinely mispronounced.

          The funniest Spanish mispronunciation is Manchaca, in Austinese: Man-Shack

          So, to actually answer you, no. Lan-No is how it is usually pronounced.

            • grantmeaname
            • 11 years ago

            In northern Ohio, there’s a Lima pronounced Lye-ma and a Versailles pronounced Ver-sails…

      • Meadows
      • 11 years ago

      I believe you mean AMD’s Propus?
      ยง[<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eta_Geminorum<]ยง

    • ApockofFork
    • 11 years ago

    This is a very different strategy from Intel’s tick tock technique. At 32nm AMD is going to revamp its architechture significantly and probably end up shooting itself in the foot doing so. I wish them the best but this isn’t a stellar roadmap to compete against intel’s. Having bought two AMD computers in the past 6 months though(after considering intel options) I think they could still pull something together.

    • Staypuft
    • 11 years ago

    I’m really surprised AMD isn’t doing a 32 nm shrink of Deneb before it launches Bulldozer. Debuting a new process tech and a new architecture in one release seems like trouble. There’s pretty much all chip manufactures stagger those upgrades.

    • Game_boy
    • 11 years ago

    Deneb vs. 32nm Nehalem? That’ll be painful.

    Also, no Fusion products to fight 2010 Larrabee…

      • Preyfar
      • 11 years ago

      If Intel’s past GPUs have been any indication… Larrabee will come out with shoddy drivers and not be any sort of threat (at least not right away). That… or it will be missing key features, similar to the GMA X3000 and T&L which took over a year to actually implement. Games support is another story.

      If Intel manages to pull out a powerhouse with Larrabee, it will be more than just ATI/ATM who has to worry. I may eat my words later, but I don’t think Larrabee will offer much challenge.

        • srg86
        • 11 years ago

        I really can’t see Intel being like that with an descrete GPU like this, they’ve spent years on developing it, and then let it go down with shoddy drivers.

        • stmok
        • 11 years ago

        It won’t be like their IGPs. Intel has a completely different team working on the Larrabee project.

        Heck, they’re organising Larrabee 2 as we speak. (See their employment notices looking for experienced engineers, etc.)

          • xastware
          • 11 years ago

          well that’s probably cause lara-stinky-bee is not a graphic product at all. it’s just there to create a enoug market share of crappy chips for devs to start think it as plausible market to contribute. in fact stinkybee is just another way to quickly repay debt from overcostly jumping on new shrink-scale. and saturating the market with some non-furbished products like amd’s k8l b2, r600, c2-pre50 sereis, p4-d. real thingy is tnt solution assuming that envy-dia won’t mistake again with monsterous dies to produce it.

      • The Dark One
      • 11 years ago

      Why would AMD’s Fusion stuff compete against Larrabee? One is for replacing OEM graphics chips and the other is an AIB.

    • srg86
    • 11 years ago

    According to Anandtech, the 45nm Phenom, is going to be called the Phenom II.

      • flip-mode
      • 11 years ago

      That would suck. AMD, Intel, and Nvidia should all defer to me concerning product naming – or anyone else here for that matter. I personally think any dunce off the street could do better.

        • srg86
        • 11 years ago

        I always prefered when chips were numbered (80386, 80486, 68040 etc)

        • ssidbroadcast
        • 11 years ago

        q[

        • ish718
        • 11 years ago

        I see nothing wrong with phenom 2 x4, its simple and it actually makes sense.

          • ludi
          • 11 years ago

          I guess a Phenom 2×4 might be AMD’s best bet for responding to an Intel Smackover. But will WWE host it?

      • Meadows
      • 11 years ago

      AMD Phenom FX II X4 30550 OverNineThousand Edition.

        • grantmeaname
        • 11 years ago

        Ampsquared, that is.

        • xastware
        • 11 years ago

        this will get yet another mysterious X in it’s name PhobosTMII FXTM X4 X750 ๐Ÿ˜€

        they keep taking to us with deep voice as long as they’ll think is sexy enough to bring horny stud customers in their crappy yurta camp

    • bfellow
    • 11 years ago

    Delays from AMD? That’s unheard of!

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