1TB Barracudas failing in droves, users claim

In the wake of the 1.5TB Barracuda 7200.11 freezing issues, swarms of users have started reporting another problem with a different 7200.11 model. According to a nine-page thread on the Seagate support forums, an abnormal quantity of 1TB ‘cudas are failing just months after being purchased.

Going by the user complaints, ST31000340AS hard drives running SD15 firmware can fail after three months of use with no warning signs—they just mysteriously vanish from the POST screen after a reboot. In an extreme case, one user posted to say two of six 1TB Barracudas from his three-month-old RAID setup bit the dust, and he returned eight days later to complain of a third failure. Another user says he suffered only two weeks after buying the drive, and at least one member has complained of a similar problem with a lower-capacity drive running the same firmware.

The Inquirer reported on the failures yesterday, claiming the issue has to do with a “faulty firmware microcode” that can brick the drive at boot detection. Supposedly, product return and data recovery centers are reporting “a very high rate of failure on these drives.”

We’ve dropped Seagate a line to get to the bottom of the issue, and we’ll post an update once we get a response. Stay tuned.

Comments closed
    • DAVIT
    • 10 years ago

    FreeAgent 1TB Barracuda 7200.11 drive failed on me., Only a week or so use. Sounds like the platter spindle wont rotate and gives a beeping sound.

    Accourding to my question on Failure rate of these drives with Seagate service support, Seagate responded with 0.34%, probably under their new MTBF system, the AFR (Annual failure rate). No indication of failed drives (returned or not.).

    • xii
    • 11 years ago

    Hmmm… return rates for this sort of product should be made public by law. If there was a sure way of having return rates listed publicly, companies might spend more time in QA and testing their products, and customers would have a better idea of what they are buying.

    • Delphis
    • 11 years ago
    • pogsnet
    • 11 years ago
      • tesla120
      • 11 years ago

      that doesn’t solve any problem, it just replaces a potential problem with a device that is prone to the majority of the same problems..

        • _Sigma
        • 11 years ago

        pfft, I just lost a Samsung SpinPoint F1 1TB drive. Hell, I even paid the early adopters tax ($300 cad). Bought it in March, died in November. It went from 4 to 10 bad sectors in 24hrs. Can’t remap them, nothing. And now I can’t figure out how to RMA the damn thing.

        /edit
        Ok, FWIW, I was able to RMA the drive over the phone. Their website is horrible and broken. At least I’ll get my new drive 🙂

          • pogsnet
          • 11 years ago
            • just brew it!
            • 11 years ago

            Which problem? Hardware problems, or problems with RMAs?

            Every brand has hardware issues from time to time. Seagate is just the most recent one (though the fact that Maxtor also had problems not too long ago makes me wonder about Seagate/Maxtor in general these days).

            WD and Hitachi (a.k.a. IBM) have also had their issues in the past, though given the current situation, they are the brands I’d recommend today.

            I’m not familiar enough with each vendor’s RMA procedures to know first-hand who is best in this regard, though I’ve heard that WD is pretty good.

            • YeuEmMaiMai
            • 11 years ago

            WDC RMA process is pretty much like anyone else’s cross ship with a credit card #. They used to send the drive 2nd day air and provide a return label. last and only drive I had fail was a 13GB unit due to a flaw in the casting…..

    • tesla120
    • 11 years ago

    just so everyone knows, the drive Seagate sent me for my Priority RMA died today when I tried to boot up my machine….

    its not in the system and not in the BIOS….

    I think im going to demand something not in the .11 series… what should I ask for???

      • LoneWolf15
      • 11 years ago

      A refund. You won’t get it, but other non .11 drives are affected too, and it’s doubtful you’ll get anything other than a .11 either.

      You could try asking for the ST31000523AS, which is the 1TB 7200.12 line, but they’re relatively new, and I don’t know if they’re available. No guarantee on whether or not they have the same issue either.

        • tesla120
        • 11 years ago

        no, no guarantee, but they didn’t list any .12’s in their KB article that was up for like 5 minutes…

        i think i will just ask for a .12 with a full 5 year warranty, its not like its a major cost to them, and as long as i dont tell them m never going to buy a seagate again they will try to keep me happy

      • MadManOriginal
      • 11 years ago

      Well it does suck and it will surely hurt Seagate’s reputation a lot but what else can they do? The thing I can think is data recovery which would be the best thing and very good ‘above and beyond’ customer service but they aren’t obligated to.

      • just brew it!
      • 11 years ago

      Heh… the drive I’ve got that is on the affected list is in a Linux system. What do you figure the odds are that the firmware updater will require me to move the drive to a Windows box?

        • Delphis
        • 11 years ago

        I know, I have my affected drives in Linux machines too.

        #92, I didn’t see your post until I posted mine. I’m glad I was able to see the article while it was up too. I referenced it in a support email to Seagate. I have 2 drives at home (750GB ones) and 2 at work (1TB ones) that I’m concerned about, since in that article it says they were manufactured *through* December.. that’s a hell of a lot of drives. My ones were made earlier, I’ve had the ones in the work machine for nearly a year now and my ones at home were manufactured in June 2008, but not installed until more recently (had to do a BIOS update on my home machine to get them to work). Both sets of drives are in RAID-1, but I’m still backing up stuff. The work ones have the benefit of a large offsite backup system we use over a 10Gbit line. My home’s backup is an older 320GB Seagate :/

    • Delphis
    • 11 years ago

    I was just looking at reviews on NewEgg for Western Digital drives too and it seems a lot of them fail too.

    I also read a thread that was about these Seagate drives failing and people were also saying ‘me too!!’ and giving drive information on 7200.10 drives.

    So.. is it just a case of a number of people happening to latch onto something about their drive failing?

    Mountain out of molehill?

      • just brew it!
      • 11 years ago

      Read my previous post (#92). Seagate has ‘fessed up.

    • d0g_p00p
    • 11 years ago

    Glad I chose the ES.2 ST31000340NS ‘cudas for my RAID setup and not the ST’s

    • RedOctober
    • 11 years ago

    Guys, what is RMA?

    I am using Seagate drives since 1997, and only 1 died like 6 years ago. But now I will think before buying Seagate.

      • MadManOriginal
      • 11 years ago

      RMA = Return Merchandise Authorization, meaning the item is authorized to be returned for replacement or refund and there is typically an RMA number to track things. In other words, it’s just shorthand for returning something under warranty for replacement.

    • Synchromesh
    • 11 years ago

    And this is why I continuously buy Western Digital for all but mobile applications. So far, so good.

      • moose17145
      • 11 years ago

      Idk… i have had 3 WDs fail on me… altho my 120GB WD is still rockin strong. At this point i am pretty much just ready to say that all the drives from all the manufacturers are gonna fails all the time all over the place and just deal with it. Part of the reason i don’t keep anything i can’t afford to lose on my computer. So i lose my saved games and pr0n… oh well. Biggest thing that would piss me off about it would be the annoyance of having to reinstall everything.

    • just brew it!
    • 11 years ago

    I mentioned this to one of my co-workers this morning. Turns out he has several 7200.11 drives configured as a RAID-5 set for his home media server. A couple of hours ago he logged in to his home network remotely and checked the status of the server… turns out one of the Seagates has already failed (but he hadn’t noticed because the RAID-5 set kept running). One of the remaining drives in the RAID-5 set is definitely running the suspect firmware version as well. He’s not a happy camper…

    I also just used a 500GB 7200.11 for a new build at home. Now I’m seriously thinking about swapping it out for a WD or Hitachi, and using the Seagate for scratch space.

    • Vaughn
    • 11 years ago

    I also only buy WD drives! Have owned a maxtor previously.

    Never really cared for seagate drives. They were always slower than the competition regardless of all the seagate fan boys jerking off to the 5 year warranty when everyone else was at 3yrs or less.

    Where is your champion now….. =)

      • MadManOriginal
      • 11 years ago

      Seagate has had advantages over time, most recently when they were first to put out perpendicular magnetic recording drives in the 7200.10 line. Before others caught up with that there was a size and general performance advantage.

    • no51
    • 11 years ago

    SeagateGate?

      • indeego
      • 11 years ago

      WaterSeag{

    • Jakubgt
    • 11 years ago

    I use to own a 7200.10, first one was really loud so I RMA’d, the 2nd drive that came in was DOA and the 3rd one came with the AAK firmware that had the performance issues. I got fed up, got my refund and purchased a WD 750gb cavalier….Never have I been happier in my life.

    • Pettytheft
    • 11 years ago

    Great, I just picked on of these up because I had a gift certificate. I’ve been buying and backing Seagate for years. Looks like it may be time to finally jump ship if this drive fails.

    • omar_1306
    • 11 years ago

    WD hard disks are nice…
    Im having two “My passports..
    160GB and 320 GB..they both are going well..

    • LoneWolf15
    • 11 years ago

    “/[

    • flip-mode
    • 11 years ago

    So, are there any Seagate lovers left here at TR? I know before this article there was a good handful of them.

    I’ve avoided Seagate drives since the 7200.9 I had due to noise levels. WD drives were always much quieter. I’ve avoided Maxtor drives since …. 1999? Maxtor’s drives were the loudest back then.

    I have always avoided drives because of noise, I have not had any failure problems. But this makes me pretty nervous. This could happen to anybody. It could be WD or Hitachi next. Scarry.

      • ssidbroadcast
      • 11 years ago

      I own a Seagate 7xxx series hard drive as an external backup for Time Machine. So far seems to be fine, but it’s not a 1TB model.

      Incidentally, due to the recent news about Seagate over the past couple months, I am a WD shareholder.

      • Usacomp2k3
      • 11 years ago

      I’m fairly apathetic at this point.

      • indeego
      • 11 years ago

      Knock pointlessly on wood, but I’ve had few HDD failures over the past three years(and I admin ~200 when including small home clients and servers.) No particular failure rate amongst any brand sticks out.

      From 2000 to about 2004 Maxtor stood out to me as a drive that failed more often than othersg{<.<}g

    • Forge
    • 11 years ago

    I have a stack of dead Seagate 7200.10 500GB sitting on a desk here at work. All dead, no signs of damage, no platter spin, nothing.

    Going to RMA the whole lot.

    • DLHM
    • 11 years ago

    I concure that Seagate drives are pieces of crap. I’ve replaced Many.. I used to buy Maxtor, but after a couple of problems,I switched to WD. The cost is definatly justified by the quality of the drive. And don’t even think about a 2.5 seagate drive, if they can’t run sitting still, imagine carrying one around everyday…

    • xtreme2k
    • 11 years ago

    i havent had a single seagate that hasnt failed. i stopped buying seagate ages ago. Their drives are slow, hot, expensive.

    • blitzy
    • 11 years ago

    well ive had many seagate drives with no issues thus far, and i do have one of the 1.5TB drives so heres hoping it’s not true

    • Saber Cherry
    • 11 years ago

    I’m not happy this happened, but I AM happy that if it had to happen, it happened to Seagate instead of WD or Samsung. Not just because I have a couple WD and Samsung drives – but because I can’t stand conglomerates that become dominant by gobbling up competitors.

    I’ve only owned one Seagate, and it still works fine (but loud). But I’ve had 3 consecutive Maxtors fail (two 6.4 GBs and a 12.8). The first was catastrophic; the others gradual (increasing bad clusters, sporadic failure to boot, louder and louder ‘grinding’ sounds, etc). And Maxtor is now part of Seagate…

    P.S. I just remembered that I still have a working 80GB Maxtor, too, that’s been driven really hard for about 5 years, sometimes with constant random I/O all over the disk for a straight month. It’s VERY loud and always has been. But it’s also extremely robust, so Maxtor can make good as well as bad.

      • srg86
      • 11 years ago

      It’s interesting how companies gobble each other up.

      Maxtor bought both MiniScribe and Quantum’s hard disk division, and then were bought out by Seagate who had also earlier merged with Conner Peripherals and bought Imprimis.

      Saying that, WD entered the hard disk business by buying Tandon’s hard disk division.

      In fact, the hard disk industry has gone from about 200 companies to about 7.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 11 years ago

      so those Maxtor fails were drives that were built prior to Seagate’s acquisition, but you blame Seagate? I’m confused.

        • Saber Cherry
        • 11 years ago

        I’m not blaming Seagate for anything, except being anticompetitive (moreso than other companies). I’m just glad that any major problem in the industry happened to them instead of someone else; partly because it could be terminal if it happened to a smaller player, and cause Seagate to buy them too. Anything that moves the industry forward on the road to a single supplier is bad.

        This was perfectly clear in my initial post and you intentionally misrepresented it.

      • ludi
      • 11 years ago

      The likely alternative was for those competitors to dwindle out of business, and for some other surviving competitor to cherrypick their phsyical and IP assets at firesale prices while leaving the rest to rot. Is that somehow better?

      If you were complaining about the Creative model of business practices (sue the competitor out of business in dirty pool, then cherry pick the bones) or the Monster model of business practices (sue everything that moves, claim it bruised your ego by sharing at least four or five consonants with your own business name), I could see where you’re coming from. As it is, though, your complaint sounds vaguely crankish.

    • srg86
    • 11 years ago

    Well this doesn’t surprise me, I’ve always found seagate drives to die first, even before IBM Deskstars (still got my 60GXP) and even Maxtors. Never had any trouble with Maxtors BTW.

    I’ve also found that I can get many more years of service out of other brands than seagate too.

      • l33t-g4m3r
      • 11 years ago

      I’ve never had problems with maxtor either.
      Of course I’ve only bought their high-end drives, eg: maxline.

      I honestly believe that maxtor made better drives than the competition, but they also sold very low quality drives as their value-line.
      I would say those drives are what gave them the reputation, but nobody else could see through that, and buy their good drives for what they were.

      afaik, maxtor now either serves as a name for seagate to dump it’s worst drives on, or portables.
      Not sure if they are making anything new by themselves, now.

      btw, I have a seagate 1.5, and no problems.
      Then again, I’m using windows, not linux.

    • FireGryphon
    • 11 years ago

    I’ve had a couple of Seagate drives fail on me in recent years. I mainly rely on Western Digital now, though I still have some Seagate’s spinning in my current system. I’d rate the WD’s as the better drives, but I still have some confidence in Seagate — about the same as in Maxtor.

    • ClickClick5
    • 11 years ago

    SEAGATE always EQUALS FAIL!

    After having 7/7 Seagate drives in the past 13 years, never again!

    Long live WD!!!!!

    • PRIME1
    • 11 years ago

    I had a 250 crap out on me.

    • Heiwashin
    • 11 years ago

    I love how newegg’s ad offers the drives right beside this article.

      • indeego
      • 11 years ago

      Gotta love those newegg reviewsg{<:<}g /[<"Cons: It smoked and caught fire on power up. Cons: They are composed completely of horse feces."<]/

    • MixedPower
    • 11 years ago

    On the plus side, Seagate’s new three year warranty is now more than long enough to cover their drives when they fail.

      • MadManOriginal
      • 11 years ago

      Turns out Seagate’s marketing -[

    • Windogg
    • 11 years ago

    I have been avoiding Seagates since the 7200.9 series. I’ve personally had to RMA 6 out of 8 Seagate drives I currently own. 1 WD out of 12 has gone bad. No Hitachis out of 5 and no Samsungs out of 4 have been RMAed. Others I know have had similar issues with Seagates.

    Their 5 year warranty was simply a marketing gimmick in my book. They only offer an advanced RMA with a $20 fee. Western Digital on the other hand has a great RMA system. Guess all those years of being bad did bring about a nice support system. Not only do they offer advanced RMA and turn drives around quickly, they’ll sell you a discounted UPS shipping label.

    The dropping of their warranty to 3 years is no big deal to me since I don’t plan on buying any Seagates any time soon.

    • indeego
    • 11 years ago

    I guess this is a sign from FSM’s tech division to finally abandon mechanicalg{<.<}g

    • Mr Bill
    • 11 years ago

    Um they were slightly ($10-15) more expensive but sounded more reliable, so I bought four 500Gb and one 1000Gb Seagate ES.2 sata drives. So far no problems in Raid 10 setup.

    • tesla120
    • 11 years ago

    mine died, 1tb of stuff gone… i was in the process of compiling and backing up all my stuff, unfortunatly I think alot of mine is gone…

    the control card died, drive wouldnt spin up on power

      • adisor19
      • 11 years ago

      Umm, AFAIK swapping boards will never work with recent drives. Each board is precisely calibrated for the specific drive it is mounted on and will never work with anything different…

      Adi

        • tesla120
        • 11 years ago

        I called Disk Savers to get a quote for kicks and giggles

        the tech confirmed that you cannot swap PCBs Platters or actuators on these with an identical donor.

        also i got a quote of $2000-3000 (after the student discount)

        for complete recovery price variance due to complexity of the problem

      • tesla120
      • 11 years ago

      97% of my ~900 gigs was useless crap i can get off of the internet again..

      its that 3% that I will never get back ever.. Pictures of my late little brother lost in the back up process

      im still in mild shock over it all… maybe someday I will find a pack of dvds I burned as backup that I currently believe were lost in moving..

      edited some stuff…

        • moose17145
        • 11 years ago

        Because I am the only one who ever seems to have the guts to say this… but why didn’t you have something like that backed up at all times in at least 2 or 3 locations? Or at the least on a couple of your drives in your computer. I always keep the really important junk like that on at least 2 hard drives at all times.

          • tesla120
          • 11 years ago

          dude you where there when it died… i was backing up all my stuff after compiling it form my other 5 drives..

            • moose17145
            • 11 years ago

            Yea i know i was there… i guess i was just thinking along the lines that i am shocked, even temporarily you had it all on only a single drive, even while backing it up. Typically you have it all scattered across like 12 different things, even while backing it up. At least i remember way back in the dorms thats the way you did it…

            • tesla120
            • 11 years ago

            I was backing everything back up to those drives, after compiling everything and removing multiple back ups i was re backing up everything to them, requiring me to delete my old backups to make room for the new ones…

          • Scrotos
          • 11 years ago

          I got bit by a similar issue, bad mobo caps that took out 4 hard drives.

          Buncha stuff that I had been meaning to go through and organize and backup to DVD, but never had the time to do it. It was always, “next weekend, for reals!”

          But yeah, all my eggs in one basket and the basket exploded so I had no more eggs. Did I learn? Not yet. Still have a bunch of stuff that I have been meaning to back up, maybe this weeked…

    • Kulith
    • 11 years ago

    At one point or another people are going to suddenly realize that Seagate blows…

    Not sure why it hasn’t happened yet.

      • ChronoReverse
      • 11 years ago

      All my HDD purchases for the past couple years have been Western Digital for a reason…

    • Zymergy
    • 11 years ago

    “Well THIS is not a mundane DETAIL!!!” (thinking about said SD15 microcode…)

      • derFunkenstein
      • 11 years ago

      Corporate accounting is sure as hell going to notice three-hundred-five thousand, 3…26.13!! Michael!

    • Flying Fox
    • 11 years ago

    Looks like the Maxtor acquisition is showing its effects and the worst of the 2 scenarios emerge: Seagate dropping down to Maxtor’s quality levels. 🙁

      • SomeOtherGeek
      • 11 years ago

      Yea, it is really roo bad cuz once upon a time, they were one of the best HDD companies around. I guess they will do like the mobo companies did in the past and keep quiet and go back to research and come out stronger? Sure hope so!

    • SomeOtherGeek
    • 11 years ago

    And people thought I was being silly or stupid for wondering why a person should have such huge drive to begin with. Scares me to death to have all that data gone from one simple drive failure.

    Note to self: Buy nothing more than 320GB drives!

      • albundy
      • 11 years ago

      heh, i’m following the same principle.

      • continuum
      • 11 years ago

      Not our fault you’re a luddite. 😉

      Some of us, or our customers, or our workplaces, etc. etc. need all the storage we can afford within our budgets… and if we can do nearline 1TB drives or 1.5TB, we will!

      (that said, RAID5 or RAID1, plus in some cases a bigass tape vault… all helps keep data secure)

        • SomeOtherGeek
        • 11 years ago

        I concur… There is no way around it. I guess you’ll just have to knock on wood more?

        So, does that mean that WD drives are the best? Or pay the big bucks and just setup a RAID 6?

          • VaultDweller
          • 11 years ago

          RAID-6?

          How many drives do you have that you’d need to use a RAID-6 array instead of RAID-5?

      • The Dark One
      • 11 years ago

      I need to find a 3.5″ floppy drive!

        • SomeOtherGeek
        • 11 years ago

        LOL!! Not the 5.25 drives??

          • bthylafh
          • 11 years ago

          Yes! An array of Quantum Bigfoot drives.

            • adisor19
            • 11 years ago

            I got one of those ! 😀

            And it still works too

            Adi

            • TechNut
            • 11 years ago

            I tossed two of those in the trash during my last move. I still remember getting it in 1992/3. 170MB… they where beauties 🙂

            • DASQ
            • 11 years ago

            I tried taking a hammer to one of those Quantums. Goddamn unbreakable. I threw it 30ft in the air and watched it drop on concrete, with barely a scratch on the casing.

            • SomeOtherGeek
            • 11 years ago

            I guess the expression is true then: “They don;t make them like they used too”…

            • CheetoPet
            • 11 years ago

            And we’re all greatful. Didn’t it run at an obscene 4500 rpm or something?

            • mac_h8r1
            • 11 years ago

            But will it blend?

            • jackaroon
            • 11 years ago

            Quantum Bigfoot dust . . . Don’t breathe it!!

    • Code:[M]ayhem
    • 11 years ago

    And in related news Seagate is shedding another 3000 employees

    See ya wouldn’t want to be ya

    • clone
    • 11 years ago

    a firmware issue seems dubious.

    a simple update would and should fix it…. it seems odd that Seagates own in house testing would have confimed this long before the this kind of news would hit the web….. .if the RMA rates are indeed hitting upwards of 20%+ one would assume an emergency firmware would be released on the web to stop the issue in it’s tracks.

    if one isn’t available yet it may be far more than just firmware as I have to assume Seagate has more than 1 employee working on it’s hdd firmware’s and that he isn’t on vacation atm with his cell phone turned off or simply asleep at home and won’t find out until tomorrow when he reads TechReport.

      • TTC
      • 11 years ago

      It likely can’t be fixed by a firmware update. The drive is reporting BSY to the controller, which effectively stops all communication with the unit. You can’t flash what you can’t communicate with. That said there is a $500 hardware kit that can unlock these drives.

      Seagate should offer to unlock all affected customers drives, and offer a firmware fix to prevent further problems. Instead they try to sell their own data recovery service($2000+)…

    • SsP45
    • 11 years ago

    I work at a small computer store and I can say with certainty that we’ve seen lots of 500GB and 1TB Seagates (SD15 firmware) die in the last 3 weeks or so, much more than normal.

    • TTC
    • 11 years ago

    I can vouch for the authenticity of the article. I lost a 1tb 7200.11 last week. The fact that Seagate is ignoring/denying the problem and censoring posts in their forum has permanently cost them my business.

    Edit: I should add that it’s not only the 1tb models that are failing. On the forums I have been reading it’s mainly 500gb models effected. I think it is a problem with the whole 7200.11 line.

    Either way thanks for reporting the story TechReport.

    • moose17145
    • 11 years ago

    Tesla lost his 1TB drive this way. He consolidated a bunch of smaller drives into the one big terabyte drive, then we had a miniature lan party over at my house and he brought his computer over. Then some time throughout the night he realized the computer wasn’t seeing the drive, rebooted and noticed the drive wasn’t even being seen in the bios. Hooked it into my machine, and same thing, bios never even saw the drive. He only owned it for about 1 or 2 weeks at that point.

    • Kent_dieGo
    • 11 years ago

    I almost bought a 1.5 TB Barracuda as they are amazingly cheap and are the largest drive you can buy. I got scared reading the Newegg reviews. I don’t need an other “Deathstar” to fill my box of failed parts. It seems like Seagate has big fiasco on their hands. Lets hope the new 7200.12 drives do better.

      • ChronoReverse
      • 11 years ago

      Hmm, this is a pretty serious blow. I still (sub)consciously avoid the Hitachi Deskstars because of the IBM “Deathstar” debacle even though my logical mind tells me otherwise.

      With the recent failures Seagate has been experiencing, they’re going to rapidly lose (or already have lost) a lot of their “street cred” that they earned from a few years back.

        • Kent_dieGo
        • 11 years ago

        Funny they have not dropped the Deskstar name. Notice Ford does not name any new car the Pinto or Edsel.

          • indeego
          • 11 years ago

          Perhaps because geek anecdotal evidence doesn’t impact long-term sales. I know a few people that used Deskstars without issue, including myselfg{<.<}g

            • Kent_dieGo
            • 11 years ago

            Sure the Pinto was a safe car once they made the gas tank modification. But the brand’s reputation was permanently ruined. At least Ford had the good sense to realize that so when they made their next line of small cars they found a new name. The name Deskstar is known for failure. The “Deathstar” fiasco drove IBM out of the harddrive buisness. I cannot believe they kept the ill fated name with newer models. I bough two Deskstars and they both failed. With a 100% failure rate and poor RMA service, I will never buy another.

            • LoneWolf15
            • 11 years ago

            And prior to “the Deathstar fiasco”, IBM had some of the fastest drives on the market, continually reviewed as such. The shop I worked for started carrying DeskStars when they were 1.5GB drives; they were some of the fastest drives we had seen at that point (up until I got the first 5400rpm IDE drive on the market, a Seagate 2.1GB).

            People who know the complete history have a much longer memory of the DeskStar line than a single generation of failed drives. Provided Seagate handles their current issues properly (something IBM did not do well during their issue), hopefully people will have a longer memory of them too, though we’ll just have to see.

            • ludi
            • 11 years ago

            Word. Seems like every time there’s a problem with a HDD vendor it produces a big flury of raging “never again” posts. Of the remaining vendor names on the market, Maxtor, IBM, and now Seagate have taken a turn at having some major problem or quality control flaw in their disks. I can’t recall if WD ever had a major problem but they were one of the last holdouts against fluid-dynamic bearings, and as a result their older drives had the faint whine of a dentist’s drill.

            Solution? Don’t be an early adopter for any new disk line, and always backup your data. That advice has been valid for twenty years and ought to hold for another twenty.

            • Delphis
            • 11 years ago

            Yea, even when we move to SSDs there’ll still be firmware bugs that cause all the data not to be readable any more.

            • Saber Cherry
            • 11 years ago

            Funny how a person with hundreds of posts on a tech site uses ‘geek’ as a pejorative. And you’re completely wrong, sorry. You apparently don’t know this, but ‘geek anecdotes’ were a primary factor in IBM – which invented the hard drive – dumping its HDD division. I don’t generally think of marketing people as “Earth’s top minds”… but some of them do a very good job. And someone who can’t understand the concept of fiascoes damaging a brand’s reputation is unqualified for even the bottom tier of the marketing profession, which is itself littered with incompetence.

            Incidentally, I don’t buy Hitachi HDDs, either… and it’s not a subconscious decision. I would trust most other Hitachi products, though.

            • just brew it!
            • 11 years ago

            The drives Hitachi has been selling for the past few years seem to be solid. I switched to Hitachi after getting burned by near-100% failure rate on the Maxtor DiamondMax 9 series. So far none of the Hitachi drives I’ve used (probably something like 8 in all) have failed.

      • YeuEmMaiMai
      • 11 years ago

      yeah I almost bought one too….but reading reviews = bought a WDC 1TB caviar black…..totally rock solid and quiet……and don’t have to worry about some firmware update to keep the drive running….obviously they didn’t test their product well enough before release….

        • Kent_dieGo
        • 11 years ago

        Did you notice the new WD 2TB drive was not released this week as rumored? My guess is they pulled the release to do extra testing due to the Seagate press. Either that or they found a show stopper bug.

    • l33t-g4m3r
    • 11 years ago

    Isn’t this lovely.

    • adisor19
    • 11 years ago

    Zune party redux ?

    Adi

      • Helmore
      • 11 years ago

      I don’t get the connection with the ‘Zune’?
      It has more in common with NVIDIA’s chipset failures, although Seagate is more open to admit that not everything is alright.

        • adisor19
        • 11 years ago

        Looks to be a timing code issue that makes the drive die just like the Zunes wrt the leap year code. Problem here is that the Seagate drives to not come back to life a day later lol

        Adi

          • Usacomp2k3
          • 11 years ago

          Actually I don’t think it’s similar at all. The drives aren’t all dying at the exact same time.

      • Draxo
      • 11 years ago

      zunes have a seagate terabyte drives in them now?

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