Seagate releases fixed firmware fix for Barracuda 7200.11s

Good news! Barracuda 7200.11 owners can now download a new firmware fix that (hopefully) won’t brick their drives. Seagate has put out yet another statement with the latest on the bricking fiasco:

Seagate has isolated a potential firmware issue in limited number of Barracuda 7200.11 hard drives and related SATA drives based on this product platform, manufactured through December 2008. In some unique circumstances, the data on the hard drives may become inaccessible to the user when the host system is powered on.
While we believe that the vast majority of customers will not experience any disruption related to this issue, as part of our commitment to customer satisfaction, Seagate is offering a free firmware upgrade to proactively address those with potentially affected products. This new firmware upgrade corrects compatibility issues that occurred with the firmware download provided on our support website on Jan. 16. We regret any inconvenience that the firmware issues have caused our customers.

To determine whether your product is affected, please visit the Seagate Support web site at http://seagate.custkb.com/seagate/crm/selfservice/news.jsp?DocId=207931.

In the unlikely event your drive is affected and you cannot access your data, the data still resides on the drive and there is no data loss associated with this issue. Seagate is working with customers to expedite a remedy.

For assistance, customers can send an email to Seagate:

Americas: discsupport@seagate.com, disksupport@seagate.com

APAC: ssdc.apacsupport@seagate.com

EMEA: Euro.techsupport@seagate.com

Support is also available through Seagate’s call center: 1-800-SEAGATE (1 800 732-4283)

Seagate released its initial firmware fix for the bricking issue on January 16, but soon after, some ‘cuda users complained that the update effectively induced the very problem it was supposed to fix. Seagate subsequently took down the firmware update for “validation.”

Interestingly, the latest statement (and the knowledge base article) say nothing of the free data recovery services Seagate promised last week. Nevertheless, Seagate spokesman Mike Hall tells us, “[There is] no change from our previous stance on data recovery. Seagate will work with customers to expedite a remedy to the firmware issue, and in the unlikely event that it is determined data recovery is necessary, we intend to make that available on a case-by-case basis.”

Comments closed
    • salsero_playero
    • 12 years ago

    how can you upgrade firmware on a HDD that is not detected by BIOS? who are we to call?

    • _Shorty
    • 12 years ago

    My drive updated to the new firmware just fine…but the drive failed a couple weeks later anyway, heh. The replacement drive came already sporting the new firmware. Hopefully it doesn’t die as quickly. Had one of their 200GB drives die on me in the last month, too. Seagate’s beginning to aggravate me. At least I got a capacity bump to 250GB when they replaced the 200GB, heh.

    • canisminor
    • 12 years ago

    Man, I’m so glad that I switched to WD drives years ago and not dealing with this bull.

    Seagate lost me when they tried to charge me for an express RMA, not sure if WD does the same thing tho 8 (

    • just brew it!
    • 12 years ago

    (Oops, posted comment in wrong article… never mind.)

    • just brew it!
    • 12 years ago

    I can report that my ST3500320AS updated without incident. The drive is now reporting that it is running the new firmware, and all data appears to be intact.

    • rsmits
    • 12 years ago

    Me too. I’ve got a 250, a 320, and 2 750 gb drives, only one of which is bricked. I’d like to get the data off it, though.

    • slaimus
    • 12 years ago

    How would you know that your drive is among the few that are affected unless it bricks on you? And if it is bricked, how would you update the firmware yourself?

    Seagate’s statements don’t really make sense.

      • Heiwashin
      • 12 years ago

      Well, the idea is that if yours is working update it. If yours does happen to be one of the few affected(means that it bricked, not that it has the risk to), you can no longer fix it yourself. At that point it’ll be necessary to work with seagate to have your drive repaired or replaced with the data retrieved.

      • just brew it!
      • 12 years ago

      There’s a list of the affected models on their site. If your drive is one of the affected ones, you should apply the update ASAP; once the drive bricks, you won’t be able to load the firmware yourself (drive will need an RMA).

    • Krogoth
    • 12 years ago

    Schadenfreude is too rich here.

    My heart is bleeding.

    • Spotpuff
    • 12 years ago

    We promise, this time, the firmware fix will not brick your drives. No, really.

    • bthylafh
    • 12 years ago

    EPIC FAIL

      • d2brothe
      • 12 years ago

      So…EPIC fail…because they failed to pretend the problem didn’t exist, and instead fixed it and provided free recover…fail indeed…screwing consumers is much better.

        • Peffse
        • 12 years ago

        I don’t know…. sure, ignoring the problem is bad, but a broken fix? That’s pretty much the definition of failure.

    • PRIME1
    • 12 years ago

    Will the fixed firmware fix, fix the fixed fix?

      • CheetoPet
      • 12 years ago

      Depends on how much wood would a woodchuck chuck if a woodchuck could chuck wood most likely.

        • cynan
        • 12 years ago

        I have one of the affected drives in an external enclosure. I guess I have to remove it and plug it into my system directly to apply the firmware? Do I still need to disconnect all of my other drives? Did seagate post any instructions on the best way to flash the drive anywhere?

          • Saber Cherry
          • 12 years ago

          /[

            • cynan
            • 12 years ago

            I know full well that you are yankin my chain, but, that was just classic! I almost sprayed a mouthful of wine all over my monitor. Well played sir.

        • Jon
        • 12 years ago

        If a woodchuck could chuck as much wood as a woodchuck could chuck then how much wood could this woodchuck chuck?

      • ludi
      • 12 years ago

      Bill had a billboard. Bill had a board bill. Bill got bored of Bill’s billboard, so Bill sold Bill’s billboard to pay bored Bill’s board bill.

    • 5150
    • 12 years ago

    *facepalm*

    • bfellow
    • 12 years ago

    Let me download that fix to my hard drive. Oh wait that’s right I can’t see my hard drive now!

    • adisor19
    • 12 years ago

    By the looks of things, the fix was rushed and the QA was barely applied to it. Oh well… At this point in time i couldn’t care less. I don’t have any of the affected drives and i won’t buy new ones due to the 5 year warranty removal. I’ll make sure to spread the word as well.

    Adi

    • ludi
    • 12 years ago

    Here’s hoping this one does the trick.

    I’ve actually still got five Seagate drives in service in three systems, albeit none newer or larger than 320GB. Up until the stuttering and bricking problems started, they were one of the better-regarded names.

    • ClickClick5
    • 12 years ago

    What is with Seagate and nvidia these days?

      • khands
      • 12 years ago

      The more complicated tech gets, the more likely it is something huge is going to be broken.

        • bthylafh
        • 12 years ago

        “The more they over-think the plumbing, the easier it is to stop up the drain.” — Scotty

      • Vasilyfav
      • 12 years ago

      What exactly is wrong with Nvidia? You tell me. And please back it up, troll.

        • 5150
        • 12 years ago

        I’m not even going to bring it up. NVIDIA’s going to get away with it.

      • OneArmedScissor
      • 12 years ago

      Lol what does this have to do with things becoming more complex? These are run of the mill hard drives. They didn’t reinvent the wheel and then discover a mysterious bug no one understands. They just plain screwed up. At least it’s fixable with a firmware update.

      As for the Nvidia thing Vasilyfav, give the guy a break. You can’t just go calling people trolls every time it’s your own damn fault you didn’t keep up with the news. Go look it up yourself. It’s not anyone else’s job to make you informed about the things you want to run your mouth about.

        • Saber Cherry
        • 12 years ago

        Oh, yeah, I forgot. Because hard drives are commonplace, they must be simple! Basically it’s just a little stone wheel inside, driven by a hidden windmill powered by airflow from case fans, and entirely 15th-century technology. I regularly scythe my lawn and drop the grass seed into my HDD to produce flour for a primitive unleavened bread, since internally it is still a fully functional gristmill that happens to have hieroglyphs etched on surface, which can be read by a lodestone.

          • ludi
          • 12 years ago

          Your lawnmower isn’t actually a simple device, but the Chinese can produce them by the hundreds of thousands and they all generally work.

          Just because a device is complex doesn’t mean it is difficult to produce a working unit with available technology and materials.

            • Heiwashin
            • 12 years ago

            Yep, ludi’s point is dead on. It’s on thing to expect problems of a prototype, but something entirely different to expect problems from a mass produced product. I will say, that mass producing processes themselves can be something of a prototype and cause problems, but that’s not to say they should be considered overly complex to produce.

          • OneArmedScissor
          • 12 years ago

          Still doesn’t explain why it would have “become more complex.”

          That just plain has nothing to do with the problem.

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