Firefox, Safari, Chrome up, IE down in share rankings

Internet Explorer is on a steady downward trend, while Firefox, Safari, and Chrome are conquering a growing number of users, according to the latest market share rankings from Net Applications.

In January, Net Applications says IE had a 67.6% share of the browser market, while Firefox held 21.5%, Safari had 8.3%, and Google Chrome commanded a modest 1.1%. IE has lost a considerable amount of ground compared to six months before: in July of last year, Microsoft’s browsers spanned 73% of the market in total, while Firefox secured only 19.2%. Further back in January 2008, IE’s market share was sitting pretty at 75.5%, and Firefox had yet to break the 17% mark.

Interestingly, CNet News points out that the slow demise of Internet Explorer 6 has accounted for much of Microsoft’s overall market share losses. IE6’s share fell from 30.6% in February 2008 to 19.2% last month, while IE7 only climbed from 44% to 47.3% over the same time period.

These figures admittedly originate from just one source, so they may not represent the browser market as a whole. Still, Net Applications does have a relatively large sample size. The firm says it collects numbers from visitors to an “exclusive on-demand network of live stats customers” that spans “160 million visitors each month.”

Comments closed
    • alphaGulp
    • 11 years ago

    This link seems to show COMPLETELY different numbers:

    §[<http://www.w3schools.com/browsers/browsers_stats.asp<]§ I wonder where they get theirs? FF in Dec '08: 44.4% vs. 21.53%...

      • Ihmemies
      • 11 years ago

      /[

    • randombytes
    • 11 years ago

    I recently tried IE8 RC1 and had numerous hang problems. I don’t think M.S. is going to retake share just yet.

    • Philldoe
    • 11 years ago

    *Makes his required daily Opera fanboy comment*

      • no51
      • 11 years ago

      *concurs with Opera comment*

        • zima
        • 11 years ago

        *solidarizes with the struggle of fanboy Operators coming from lands where The Cause hasn’t yet gained much of a foothold.

          • Palek
          • 11 years ago

          *Agrees and whines how people would not know a quality browser if it came and bit them in the butt.*

            • titan
            • 11 years ago

            *Points out how the previous posters are just a bunch of rabid fanbois, ergo they’re comments aren’t worth anything because they aren’t objective.

            • indeego
            • 11 years ago

            *chips in that Opera, despite its great rendering speed and featureset, is still missing features that many FF users can’t live without.g{<*<}g

            • ssidbroadcast
            • 11 years ago

            *Retorts that Opera includes in-the-box features that FF either “steals” or requires an extension thereof.*

            • AxMi-24
            • 11 years ago

            Exactly. Opera works out of the box. Just install, move the tabs to bottom and you are done.

            one thing that sucks is support for proxies and gpg in mail (or rather lack of it). Still it’s my main browser and will stay that way for the foreseeable future.

            • indeego
            • 11 years ago

            As I mentioned in another post, Opera couldn’t fulfill the basic necessities that FF can for me. Again, agree to disagreeg{<.<}g

    • Thanato
    • 11 years ago

    I use Firefox more or less.

    I’ve used Safari and I just didn’t like it, the interface was annoying to work with.

    I’m using Chrome and I really like it, only it has compatibility issues with many web sites (hotmail doesn’t work, many video players don’t work), but I really like the layout and simplicity of it. It also feels faster than Firefox.

    I haven’t used IE in many years.

    • derFunkenstein
    • 11 years ago

    Maybe alternabrowsers should have names that kind of explain what they do. Firefox? Chrome? WTF? I want Internet Ass Kicker, or Web Walker…whatever.

      • Thanato
      • 11 years ago

      Your not seeing the trend. If you name it as you should then it’s just another program that no one cares about. If you name it something odd with few syllables and a common easy to remember name, then it’s cool and hip. Truck, spank, dude, wobu, tang, snugy, these are all perfect names for trendy software.

        • Traz
        • 11 years ago

        I propose Firefox be renamed “Tangspank Truck”.

          • Thanato
          • 11 years ago

          I like where this is going.

          • UberGerbil
          • 11 years ago

          Your ideas intrigue me and I would like to subscribe to your newsletter.

      • Wirko
      • 11 years ago

      You probably use a Mac. If you don’t, you should. OS X lets you do ten different things while Windows 7, when it’s baked, will only let you do seven different things.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 11 years ago

        your dumbass comment has nothing to do with what i wrote.

      • fpsduck
      • 11 years ago

      How about ‘Pr0n Sighting 1.0’ ?

      • AKing
      • 11 years ago

      I don’t agree, having too obvious product names can often sound booring and cheap. Firefox, as an example, is original and has character (albeit it is by far not the best productname out there). Of course it helps to have explanatory names, but in my opinion, a name focusing on something too obvious is not a good thing, it should focus on the vision of the product, and what sets it apart etc.

    • Unckmania
    • 11 years ago

    Really IE8 has the potential to start regaining market by taking the other advantages MS has as a OS provider.
    I still wish more people tried Opera and liked it so we could have more competition and more quality.

      • satchmobob
      • 11 years ago

      How can people not like Opera? Its simply a joy to use!

        • indeego
        • 11 years ago

        – No snuggleblocking as powerful or easy as snuggleblock+
        – No scripting/plug-ins/XSS/clickjacking, etc control like nosnuggle.
        – rendering on some sites is still fairly bad, and has been for years.
        – some sites don’t work at allg{<.<}g r{

          • zima
          • 11 years ago

          – §[<http://www.fanboy.co.nz/adblock/opera/<]§ At least as good when it comes to blocking as any good Adblock list (and supposedly better in removing "whitespaces" according to my buddy who moved from FF), but uses built-in browser mechanisms. And there's a nice to block additional elements if something goes through - Not sure how paranoid level of control do you need, but for me blocking plugins by default on every site, all external cookies and tracking scripts using above list, with whitelisting few sites, is enough. All built-in. As for rendering...well, Opera takes fairly "no-BS" approach to implementing standards, which: a) is a better approach in the long term IMHO b) doesn't impact me; EN sites which wouldn't work (those that I care to remember/visit work good so far...) would be ignored, local sites got the message and try to be browser-agnostic (but we have much better situation in browser share: IE 47%, FF 44%, Opera 8%, Webkit 1% (still not as good as Ukraine: IE 46%, Opera 29%, FF 22%, Webkit 2% - they seem to be going towards roughly equal share of every major engine; perfect situation IMHO))

            • indeego
            • 11 years ago

            Sweet. This is the first time someone from Opera has given me instructions that actually got me somewhere in Opera.

            The adblocking and element blocking is working. I will play with moreg{<.<}g Thanks.

            • indeego
            • 11 years ago

            Spoke too soon. A few sites had a certain something still visible from Amazon. For what it’s worth, on FF, those certain somethings never are visibleg{<. <}g edit 2: After half a days use, I had to stop. Too many things I didn't want to see. Perhaps Opera will get a better list to block what I don't wish to see, some day. Some more general notes: I did like the forward/back speed. Much faster than FF3.0.5 It took longer to get the menus and bookmarks how I like them. jpg rendering quality seemed a tad lower than ff. logos like TR and betanews didn't look as crispg{<.<}g

          • Meadows
          • 11 years ago

          Ad blocking isn’t as important for everyone, plus Damage will take your head for advertising anti-advertising.

            • ImSpartacus
            • 11 years ago

            Ads aren’t important? Are you serious? A week or two ago I decided to try Chrome again after not giving the beta a serious look. I loved the speed and screen efficiency, but I noticed the ads immediately. It is a total deal breaker for me. I’ll stick with FF until Chrome gets adblock or something similar.

            • yehuda
            • 11 years ago

            Agreed, Chrome is a delight to use but it does need at least an ad blocker.

      • jdaven
      • 11 years ago

      This is the whole reason IE has such a large market share to begin with not what they will get in the future. It was tied to the OS and now it just comes with the OS. Now that more people are becoming educated with computers they know that there are better alternatives out there.

      Therefore, since IE has been tied/bundled with Windows for the last 13 years, IE 8.0 will not increase market share for the effect you stated. Where have you been for the last 13 years (anti-trust lawsuits, browser wars with Netscape, forced removal of IE from start menu and program list in the control panel, EU fining MS for including IE, etc., etc, etc.)?

        • Unckmania
        • 11 years ago

        And the new IE8 seems fairly competent so one would expect people to stick with it rather thank thinking of changing to other browser. With all the wars and stuff you mention, i guess i didn’t express myself correctly.

    • Ricardo Dawkins
    • 11 years ago

    yay for net applications marketshare numbers!

    • UberGerbil
    • 11 years ago

    In possibly related news, in the northern hemisphere the days are getting longer.

      • indeego
      • 11 years ago

      uh, you mean daylight, I assumeg{<.<}g 😉

        • UberGerbil
        • 11 years ago

        Days, as opposed to nights. As in the colloquial rather than astrophysics geek sense.

    • UberGerbil
    • 11 years ago

    If you put the IE icon on the desktop and start menu and quickstart etc but had them all actually be shortcuts to launch FF, I wonder how many people would notice.

    I switched my aunt between IE, FF, and Opera and all she said at one point was “What did you do — when I’m on the internet the outside of the window looks funny”

      • Usacomp2k3
      • 11 years ago

      My old boss used to do this. *sigh*

    • jbraslins
    • 11 years ago

    I like IE. I tried Safari and FireFox and just never found a good reason to use them over IE. Maybe that’s because I do not click YES every time i get a popup and install 100s of toolbars.

      • DrDillyBar
      • 11 years ago

      The Internets aren’t this smart

      • lou2001
      • 11 years ago

      I use FF and a do not click YES every time I get a popup because… well… I do not get popups.

        • Saber Cherry
        • 11 years ago

        haha:)

        Touche.

    • MadManOriginal
    • 11 years ago

    I think it would be interesting if they got more system details in the survey. For example, how does the boom of linux-based netbooks that presumably don’t come with IE affect this?

      • Meadows
      • 11 years ago

      What’s this “boom” you’re referring to? It’s best addressed as a “pop”.

        • MadManOriginal
        • 11 years ago

        It’s a growth segment. Granted there are netbooks with XP as well.

    • Decelerate
    • 11 years ago

    I rather like Chrome…

      • Da_Boss
      • 11 years ago

      I agree. It’s noticeably faster than anything I’ve ever used, including FF3. If a quick, easy, minimalist approach is your thing when it comes to web browsing, look no further.

      I really only still use FF for the FireFTP addon…

      • pedro
      • 11 years ago

      As do I. It does what I need, and nothing more.

      Of course, I’m selling my soul to Google by using it but I figure I already use their email, maps, news service, search engine, other apps – why not go the whole way?

      • odizzido
      • 11 years ago

      me too. I’d love to make it my primary browser, but it just doesn’t work with all my sites so it’s FF3 for me still.

      • shaq_mobile
      • 11 years ago

      i love chrome, short, quick and to the point. i dont need alot of the cool functions that come with the other browsers. i just want something that will get me wher ei want to go fast. too bad windows 7 hates the hell out of chrome. it randomly crashes all the time. good thing it has multiple processes ^_^ and when it DOES crash i can just hit hte back button because it just gives me page errors. sweet!

      the internet is a destination. not a journey. 😀

    • kcarlile
    • 11 years ago

    We put firefox on every single one of our deployed machines. Barely anyone uses it.

    Then again, we don’t necessarily tell people it’s there…

      • henfactor
      • 11 years ago

      {Adam Savage voice} “Well there’s your problem!”

        • 5150
        • 11 years ago

        Lubricate!

      • grantmeaname
      • 11 years ago

      let me guess, you forgot to take off internet explorer

      • jdaven
      • 11 years ago

      Try switching the default browser to FF and then put an icon on the desktop for FF labeled Internet. I bet they will look at the FF icon for one second, then double-click and never think twice about it.

      Most people don’t know what a web browser is much less which one is the best to use. Anyone is just going to use what they were shown in the first place and not go looking/researching another one.

      Remember just because someone uses Windows, IE, Word, etc. doesn’t mean they prefer it over something else. It just means that’s all they know and taught in the first place and don’t care enough to go looking for something else.

      This is why MS will have a hard time in the future when more users care about their internet experience and speed (ie. facebook, twitter, skype, etc.) and pick the software that works the best (speed, interface, usability, etc.). If MS doesn’t compete with these things (web standards is important too) then more and more young people will install other browsers like FF.

        • MBIlover
        • 11 years ago

        I split browsing at work between IE7 and FF3. I would work completely within FF, but sadly certain company sites only play nice with IE. I can vouch that the different companies I’ve worked for had sites that were only compatible with IE. If this sort of situation is common, then perhaps as corporate sites are slowly coded for other browsers we may see a large shift in usage.

        Personally I don’t know how anyone uses IE as their primary browser. The eternity it takes for a new tab to open is reason enough to shun it. I would use anything else – FF, Opera, Chrome, Safari, whatever – before going back to IE.

    • PRIME1
    • 11 years ago

    Everyone who I have downloaded Firefox for, has never gone back to IE.

    I bet if Firefox came with Windows as well as IE the numbers would be reversed.

      • Traz
      • 11 years ago

      that’s not necessarily true. All of the computers at my school have both IE and Firefox, yet everytime i look over nearly everyone else is using IE

        • dermutti
        • 11 years ago

        That’s probably more of an issue of most users associating the blue ‘e’ with getting online rather than them being aware of what a browser is.

          • indeego
          • 11 years ago

          At work I offer FF and IE, and from proxy logs I show FF use stable at 35-40% for years now. I’ve never pushed either browser on anyone, so I find that pretty impressive that so many people (many nongeeks) use itg{<.<}g

        • jdaven
        • 11 years ago

        see post number 37 for an answer to your observation.

        • pogsnet
        • 11 years ago

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