New triple-channel Corsair DDR3 kits run at up to 2GHz

Corsair isn’t joking around with its latest batch of DDR3 kits for Core i7 systems. The memory firm has launched three kits as part of a new Dominator GT lineup, which mixes blistering clock speeds, fancy cooling, and intimidating price tags.

Expect to find just one Dominator GT kit in stores: the 6GB PC3-15000 offering, which includes three 2GB modules rated for operation at up to 1,866MHz with 7-8-7-20 timings and a 1.65V memory voltage. If you’re feeling more adventurous, you can also pop in Corsair’s online store for 3GB and 6GB PC3-16000 kits rated for 2,000MHz with the same timings and voltage. Corsair claims the 2GHz Dominator GT modules are “hand-screened, hand-tuned,” and available in “very limited quantities.”

The firm hasn’t skimped on cooling, either. All Dominator GT sticks have single-piece heatsinks with removable cooling fins, which can give way to mounts for liquid cooling, air cooling, or a “custom-designed thermoelectric cooling system.” See the image gallery below for photos.

Price-wise, Corsair’s online store charges $300 for the 3GB PC3-16000 kit, $580 for the 6GB variant, and $480 for the slightly more pedestrian 6GB PC3-15000 offering. All three products have lifetime warranty coverage.

Comments closed
    • pedro
    • 11 years ago

    I feel physically sick having read this article.

    • Krogoth
    • 11 years ago

    Why?

    Just stick with JEDEC-rated modules. That is unless you are trying to overclock. I even doubt you would need that kind of cooling with the memory if you were to do any sort of overclocking.

    • marvelous
    • 11 years ago

    Active cooling on memory? ROFL.

    • Rakhmaninov3
    • 11 years ago

    I’d rather have another stick of RAM for the cost of that cool-looking but most likely pointless cooling getup.

    • BoBzeBuilder
    • 11 years ago

    That cooler could cool a quad-core cpu. What a gimmik.

    • OneArmedScissor
    • 11 years ago

    Holy cow, now my computer can do all the same things at the same real world speeds, for only an additional $300!

      • tay
      • 11 years ago

      Exactly!! Computer products that are geared towards cheap or deluxe user experience are going to win out over this shit. Especially with the doom and gloom in the economy.

    • Anomymous Gerbil
    • 11 years ago

    True or false? I read different opinions…

    Memory cards, even at these speeds, don’t actually need heatsinks (or heat-spreaders).

      • MadMax
      • 11 years ago

      I doubt it, heat spreaders on RAM barely accomplish anything heat-transfer wise, if anything, the heatsinks give the ram something to grip it by. DIMM RAM doesn’t need a heatsink because it spreads activity (and thus heat) fairly evenly across all of the memory chips in the stick. The only type of RAM I know of that needs a heatsink is Rambus RAM, which, by design, is able to concentrate activity and thus heat onto a single chip. In the case of Rambus RAM, the heatsink is soldered directly to the stick and is not meant to be removed.

      • SomeOtherGeek
      • 11 years ago

      I have to agree with you.

      I have OCZ ram that are overclocked to be 1:1 with the FSB and it is the coolest part of the motherboard. The “heat-spreader” if you would call them that to me looks more like decoration than anything else. Mine are 1066, but right now they are matching the FSB at 1333 and have been that way for almost a year without a problem. So, I really have to agree with you on that.

      So, all those heat coolers above sounds so unnecessary. You agree?

      • pogsnet
      • 11 years ago
        • evermore
        • 11 years ago

        I don’t think dust is electrically conductive. At least, I never ran into any short circuits in the systems I used to support that had a literal half-inch layer of dust inside them.

        Heatsinks only add stability if you were at the margins of stability in the first place, i.e., overclocking to extremes. The surface area of memory chips is enough to dissipate heat when running at standard voltages. (Modules that require half a volt over standards just to run at standard speeds may get some benefit.)

    • TheBob!
    • 11 years ago

    Looks great! Not sure about the price though.

    • Meadows
    • 11 years ago

    What’s a “thermoelectric cooling system”?

    • Farting Bob
    • 11 years ago

    Can any board/CPU actually run stable with these at 2Ghz though? I know many superfast DDR3 chips struggle to run at the rated speed even on the new X58 boards, especially if you have them in dual channel or fully populated.

    • CheetoPet
    • 11 years ago

    Really hope that waterblock supports 6 DIMMs. And what are those, like 1/4″ barbs? Be silly to have to run your RAM in its own loop , unless theres G1/4 fittings hidden in there somewhere.

    • PRIME1
    • 11 years ago

    I thought I was looking at a new CPU cooler for a second.

    • lex-ington
    • 11 years ago

    Maybe Maxis can start making games like “Sim-Mobo” since all the cooling solutions are starting to look like Condo’s.

      • ssidbroadcast
      • 11 years ago

      Let’s see, should I zone for PCIe-16, DIMM, or SATA? Also I need to increase power funds to the South Bridge…

        • SecretMaster
        • 11 years ago

        Imagine the disasters you could unleash. Electrical shortage, water spill, cockroaches (insider forum joke)

          • ssidbroadcast
          • 11 years ago

          Oh yeah the Cockroach Necropolis disaster would be the grossest one, by far. Lightning Strike (w/out UPS-supported powerplant) would probably be the most devastating, though.

    • MadManOriginal
    • 11 years ago

    Looks like a worthy upgrade to the DHX-type heatsinks which imo are one of the few heatsink/spreaders that seems likely to do much. Otherwise the prices are naturally silly although they’re the highest-end products, what speed is needed to get 1:1 with a 200MHz bclk?

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