New ultra-low-voltage Intel CPUs may launch in March

Intel has a pair of new processors for ultra-thin notebooks up its sleeve, according to DigiTimes. The site quotes anonymous sources at notebook manufacturers who predict the arrival of Core 2 Duo SU9600 and Core 2 Solo SU3500 processors "by the end of March."

The Core 2 Duo SU9600 will reportedly have a 1.6GHz clock speed with a $289 volume price tag, while the Core 2 Solo SU3500 will run at 1.4GHz and cost $262. Judging by the names, the latter should be a single-core offering. DigiTimes writes that these CPUs will complement the SU9400, SU9300, SU3300, and Celeron 723 models in the "consumer ultra low voltage" portion of Intel’s notebook CPU lineup.

Right now, Intel’s price list shows the 1.4GHz Core 2 Duo SU9400 priced at $289 and the 1.2GHz SU9300 part at $262. Both processors have 800MHz front-side bus speeds, 3MB caches, and 10W power envelopes. If DigiTimes’ information is accurate, these CPUs would likely drop in price once the SU9600 shows up.

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    • AMDisDEC
    • 10 years ago

    I really doubt Intel is targeting the low cost market with these devices. That’s what the Atom and Celeron are for. These are targeting the REAL embedded market, and perhaps, high end, high ASP netbooks.

      • UberGerbil
      • 10 years ago

      The REAL embedded market runs ARM and Power derivatives. What market are you talking about?

        • AMDisDEC
        • 10 years ago

        LOL, ARMs or AMD processors aren’t used to control power plants, fly UAVs, the space shuttle, or even subways, trains or traffic lights. Intel and Freescale dominate in these markets. AMD is virtually, MIA.

        I guess what I’m saying is, there are consumer devices which fall under the category of embedded such as hand-held devices, ect. These are medium to high volume, but low ASP sales for processor companies.
        Than there are the mission critic, must perform under all conditions embedded devices that tend to be used in fail proof systems. These are the low to medium volume, high ASP devices.
        AMD processors are designed and can be used for the former, while Intel devices are designed for both. This is why Intel devices are, pervasive.

          • UberGerbil
          • 10 years ago

          Who said anything about AMD? You have some kind of weird obsession that causes you to inject it into places that make no sense, like your username.

          And Freescale produces (among other things) Power derivatives.

            • willyolio
            • 10 years ago

            he’ll do anything to make a jab at AMD. hell, if GMC goes down, he’ll be the first to say something like “GMC’s engineering team must have used AMD processors, that’s why they went bankrupt.”

            • ludi
            • 10 years ago

            Give him until December or so. I hear he’s about due to be visited by the three ghosts of Jerry Sanders, Hector Ruiz, and Ahab Al-Arab. Afterwards, he will change his trollish ways and buy an Opteron for everyone.

            • AMDisDEC
            • 10 years ago

            That is a strong possibility. Many a division has already shut down due to dealing with AMD and having them pull the plug on a processor line their based their product on, but don’t let facts get in the way of your rant.

          • Hattig
          • 10 years ago

          Freescale produce ARM and PowerPC products, exactly as the person you attacked says.

      • Bombadil
      • 10 years ago

      The “low end” Celeron 723 is $161. These “new” chips are all exactly the same silicon as a $64 Pentium Dual Core E5200, but you don’t get the warranty or even a heatsink. Sorry, I’ll pass.

        • AMDisDEC
        • 10 years ago

        Are you comparing the “Ultra Low” power versions of each? When Intel designs these Ultra low power versions, they are not designing them with desktop gaming systems in mind.

          • dragmor
          • 10 years ago

          Yes but the average undervolter can get very similar results with the cheapest C2D chips.

          2 years ago I had a E4300 that ran 100% stable at its stock 1.8ghz on 1.0v, no other tweaks just dropping the voltage.

            • OneArmedScissor
            • 10 years ago

            I personally don’t think that the prices of laptop Core 2s make any sense, whatsoever. It’s no wonder laptop manufacturers are having such a hard time moving Core 2s in the price range that the mobile Nehalems would have been.

            But they have to price relative to performance, starting from the bottom up. And what’s way down there? Another Intel product which makes loads of sense: Atom, the pinnacle of modern computing!

    • StashTheVampede
    • 10 years ago

    I’d go with lower clockspeed for a cheaper price to make them for netbooks!

    • AMDisDEC
    • 10 years ago

    So, how “Low” IS Ultra Low? Netbooks are the low ASP market of where these devices would compete.
    The real niche, where AMD can’t compete is in the low power, High ASP markets.

    • Game_boy
    • 10 years ago

    OK, so they’ll be faster than AMD’s Yukon, but also far more expensive. And Intel’s graphics will still suck so AMD’s ultraportable platform (or Ion) will continue to be better value.

    • vanishingvision1985
    • 10 years ago

    These CPUs are for mainly netbooks I’m guessing. Does this mean that single cores would be obsolete soon?

    And how does the price compare vs the current single core? I wouldn’t want to pay over 450 for a netbook.

      • MadManOriginal
      • 10 years ago

      There’s no way a $250+ CPU is going in to a netbook, or if they did you’d have to give up netbook pricing. These are for ultraportables.

      • eitje
      • 10 years ago

      Welcome to Tech Report!

      MadMan has the right idea – these are for the high-end ultraportables, not the cheapo netbooks.

    • eitje
    • 10 years ago

    I understand market segmentation and all, but boy – I’d love to drop something like that into an SFF desktop.

      • TaBoVilla
      • 10 years ago

      I know it’s impossible right now but I’d like to have one of these in my cell phone.

        • ludi
        • 10 years ago

        Sounds a bit like wishing for a small-block V8 in your riding lawnmower. It can be done, and it would get a lot of attention, but it’s really the wrong device for the job. After about three months, once the novelty wore off, you would be staring at the receipts and wondering “What was I /[

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