New Mobility Radeon HD 4860, 4830 have 40nm graphics chips

Notebook users had to wait six months for AMD to fashion Mobility parts out of its Radeon HD 4000-series desktop graphics processors. The company apparently decided not to impose a similar wait for that architecture’s die shrink, because it’s just announced a pair of mobile GPUs based on a brand-spanking-new 40nm GPU.

The Mobility Radeon HD 4860 and 4830 are purportedly the world’s first notebook graphics processors based on 40nm process technology, but they’re not high-end parts—or straight die shrinks of the RV770, for that matter. AMD has outfitted the GPUs with 640 stream processors (down from 800 on the RV770) and 128-bit memory interfaces (down from 256-bit) with support for both GDDR5 and GDDR3 memory.

Before you turn up your nose at the memory bus width, consider the following: with the maximum supported GDDR5 memory speed of 4GT/s, the new Mobility Radeon HD 4860 should have up to 64GB/s of memory bandwidth at its disposal. By contrast, the desktop Radeon HD 4850 only has up to 57.6GB/s despite its 256-bit interface, because it normally uses only GDDR3.

The narrower memory interface, reduced stream processor count, and smaller process also resulted in a smaller, less power-hungry chip, which has allowed AMD to ramp up clock speeds. These 40nm mobile Radeons can run at up to 650MHz, a whole 100MHz faster than the top-of-the-line Mobility Radeon HD 4870. AMD quotes 832 gigaFLOPS of peak floating-point power, too, which isn’t that far off the Mobility Radeon HD 4870’s 880 gigaFLOPS. (The 4870 does, however, have significantly more memory bandwidth—up to 102GB/s). Put all that together, and AMD claims the Mobility Radeon HD 4860 outperforms the RV770-based 4850 by a small margin in 3DMark06.

Unfortunately, AMD stayed mum on its release schedule when it briefed us about the new GPUs. The company nevertheless mentioned that it was “working with quite a few OEMs to launch this product,” and it said we could “presume that this [launch] will be tied to one of our partners.” You can probably look forward to Mobility Radeon HD 4860- and 4830-powered notebooks in the near future.

Comments closed
    • StuG
    • 11 years ago

    This is good news from the AMD camp, maybe I’ll pick up a lappy for myself with a 4830 in it. That would be pretty sweet (and hopefully pretty cheap too).

    • prtzlboy
    • 11 years ago

    I really want to see a 4860m in a 15.4″ (or even a 14″) notebook. I’d really like to sell my m1330 and pick up a netbook / gaming notebook duo instead, but I will not be bothered to carry around a 17″ beast.

      • vanishingvision1985
      • 11 years ago

      Maybe you’re just weak, start hitting the gym.

    • Xenolith
    • 11 years ago

    So will any of these be made into MXM II parts? Need one of these for my ASUS c90s.

    • Firestarter
    • 11 years ago

    A plea to AMD: please release drivers for these GPUs for *any* laptop, and update them like you would normally. DO NOT rely on 3rd parties to handle notebook specific drivers! There should be no need for such drivers!

    The lack of a proper general Mobile Catalyst driver has been a pain in the ass for anyone with your GPUs in his/her laptop, and it is seriously hurting the potential of these GPUs.

      • dragmor
      • 11 years ago

      I’ve had no problems using the normal catalyst drivers on my laptop. Still its only 3200 IGP.

      • grantmeaname
      • 11 years ago

      §[<http://www.driverheaven.net/modtool.php<]§ It's not ATi doing it, it's laptop manufacturers. Download that tool and MSXML 6.0 and it'll modify the driver so it doesn't check to see if your laptop maker has "locked" it.

        • Firestarter
        • 11 years ago

        So I should blame ASUS? Funny how my laptop had 0 problems with the XP 32bit drivers supplied by ATI, while it is not allowed to run the Vista 64bit Mobility drivers.

        My point is that an ATI supplied GPU should have ATI drivers, like desktop graphics cards. That ATI allows 3rd party manufacturers to neuter their laptops by making them incompatible with the ATI/AMD drivers drives me nuts.

        That mod tool only proves my point. Last time I tried upgrading the driver, I’ve had to mod half a year worth of drivers to find one that would run. That was a great consumer experience I had right there, fun fun fun.

    • toyota
    • 11 years ago

    /[http://www.pcgameshardware.com/aid,677447/Palit-HD-4850-Sonic-Special-Edition-with-GDDR5-RAM/News/<]§

    • asdsa
    • 11 years ago

    Those should wipe out competition pretty well.

      • MadManOriginal
      • 11 years ago

      Yeah except…these are discrete rather than part of a chipset right? That does give NV a huge advantage in the laptop GPU market.

        • TravelMug
        • 11 years ago

        What?

        [Some junk for the 10 char limit]

          • khands
          • 11 years ago

          Spaces man, spaces.

            • ludi
            • 11 years ago

            What?

            • ssidbroadcast
            • 11 years ago

            “*[

        • Firestarter
        • 11 years ago

        A Mobile GPU doesn’t need to be part of a chipset anymore than a desktop GPU needs to.

          • MadManOriginal
          • 11 years ago

          I know that, I’m not stupid and I don’t know why that was your reply to my post in which I even said ‘discrete.’ I did however have 9400M on the brain for some reason. What does AMD have that’s integrated to compare with the 9400M? I don’t keep up with the latest in notebook graphics. My point was that it won’t ‘wipe out competition,’ first off because the discrete mobile NV parts are competitive and second because integrated graphics makes up a far larger portion of the laptop market and the 9400M is a pretty compelling integrated graphics core with some oomph.

            • Hattig
            • 11 years ago

            What’s a 9400M … don’t you mean a GT100M?

            (yeah, thanks NVIDIA)

            These are going to be under half the die area of the 55nm RV770 variants. That means they’ll be significantly cheaper to make, unless the yields are appalling. Not only did AMD already have a far smaller die than NVIDIA, but they’re rubbing it in now.

            • squngy
            • 11 years ago

            you’re a bit wrong. You were probably thinking of the gt200’s when you compared sizes.

            As you know nvidia will be using g92b cores for the new mobile GPUs and those aren’t much bigger than rv770.

            §[<http://www.techpowerup.com/img/09-03-02/47a.png<]§ (why do you think they went and rebranded them (again) over downclocking the gt200 in the first place?)

            • pluscard
            • 11 years ago

            AMD already wipes the floor with nvidia when it comes to integrated graphics chipsets.

            • OneArmedScissor
            • 11 years ago

            It’s easier for me to find a reasonably priced laptop with a Radeon 3200 than a Geforce 9400, and that’s only going to become even more common place since they’re standardizing it for $500-600-ish laptops.

            The 9400 may or may not be slightly faster than the 3300, which is clearly faster than the 3200, but that’s not the end of the world. I don’t think it’s really going to matter when you’re running 1280×800, and while they could literally double the clock speed with the same chips, it likely wouldn’t end up serving any purpose but wasting battery power. It can play HD video and games at that resolution, so no real loss there.

            Nvidia may have outright better integrated GPUs for laptops once they’ve shifted to the GTS 100s, as the replacement for the 9300 is a lot more powerful, but they haven’t said if there’s going to be an integrated equivalent of a 9500GT, which would be the next step up if they knock the 9400 down. If that doesn’t happen, price and availability dictates who “wins,” which, unless you’re buying a Mac, is probably going to be AMD.

            • MadManOriginal
            • 11 years ago

            Desktop or mobile? ‘Wipe the floor’ seems pretty extreme just like ‘wipe out the competition’…which, for the second time, is the sentiment to which I was really replying.

    • xmz
    • 11 years ago

    Finally we’ll have some “real new” mobile GPU, not rebranded-not-enough-just-yet “new” GPU. I know this might sound like I’m an AMD fanboy, but let’s face it. NVidia has been doing this over and over again.

    • BoBzeBuilder
    • 11 years ago

    Hi AMD. I’m the new Techreport boss, please send me one of your new 40nm desktop GPUs. Thanks.

      • DrDillyBar
      • 11 years ago

      Processor isn’t an issue. 🙂

      • TaBoVilla
      • 11 years ago

      It would be funny if they actually sent you what you are asking for. . a plain chip, card-less, pin-less, memory-less 40nm desktop GPU.

    • Buzzard44
    • 11 years ago

    Sounds pretty sweet. Real decent for notebook graphics. My laptop has a 200M…….(Few generations behind, I guess).

    I’m referring to an ATI 200M, of course, not a new NVidia card.

      • Kurkotain
      • 11 years ago

      its funy because i purchased an ASUS with a 9600gs and feel that its adecuate (considering the 1280 . 800) resolution

        • khands
        • 11 years ago

        Yeah, the average resolution on laptops being no more than 1280×1024, these cards will be processor bottle necked till it’s paired with a mobile i5/i7

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