MSI proto-nettop combines Celeron, GeForce, Blu-ray

Despite their uncertain future, Nvidia’s integrated graphics chipsets are definitely still alive and kicking. Engadget reports that MSI has unveiled an interesting little machine called the Wind Box DE200. While it looks a whole lot like Asus’ Eee Box nettops, the systems includes a Celeron M processor, an Nvidia GeForce 9400M chipset, and a Blu-ray drive, making it more like a tiny media center PC than anything else.

The Wind Box DE200’s processor runs at 2GHz, likely making it faster than the 1.6GHz single-core Atom that’s so commonplace in nettops. MSI has also tossed in 2GB of DDR2 memory, a 160GB hard drive, 802.11n Wi-Fi, and a choice of HDMI and DVI display outputs. And, further eschewing the nettop trend, the company has selected Windows Vista Home Premium as its operating system of choice.

In our review of Nvidia’s Ion platform, we found that the GeForce 9400 happily decoded 1080p video with an Atom riding shotgun, but the single-channel memory setup caused problems with 1080i playback. If MSI outfits the DE200 with dual-channel RAM, it could have a very potent media center system on its hands—one that should even be able to play reasonably recent games at lower resolutions.

Comments closed
    • kilkennycat
    • 11 years ago

    l[

      • TheBob!
      • 11 years ago

      I think you are confusing actual sales with news reports. Sure Nvidia is getting headlines here in the tech work, but actual sales numbers are not as strong as you may think.

        • Anonymous Coward
        • 11 years ago

        20% might be generous, but Apple has switched all (?) of their applicable products. That’s significant.

      • Farting Bob
      • 11 years ago

      Which is why Intel will be putting the IGP inside the CPU on some of the i5 chips next tear.

      • kitsunegari
      • 11 years ago

      “…a very interesting twist of the core-logic knife”

      Dude that is some most righteously appropriate creative articulation!

      It’s ironically interesting that iNTEL’s performance crown in the CPU game derives itself not from the monolithic stature and resources so often uniquely attributed to the company, but rather the very same attribute that facilitate it’s chief competitors’ (nVIDEA and ATi -or for that matter any business’) market relevance: FOCUS.

      By heavily out-investing the x86-core IPC market iNTEL itself created with cutting edge process node transitions, they effectively maintain control of the PC platform from the “top down”.

      This resource allocation comes at the expense of their chipset and graphics which have no doubt long since played second fiddle in both performance and R&D spending.

      This fiscal paradigm all changes with “Larabee” which seeks to reconcile the R&D returns of their CPU investments with their graphics/HPC endeavors by effectively marrying/consolidating the x86 IPC with those products.

      Thereby- and this is in iNTEL’s wildest wet dreams mind you- ushering in a veritable vertically integrated IPC evolutionary monoculture for most of the computing industry.

      This “top to bottom” approach to market dominance that iNTEL has taken is, I believe, in contrast to that of AMD. By starting with HPC(look no further to their success in Opteron based enterprise servers prior to i7) and Graphics (ATi) we can see the rationale behind not only the “ball-busting” purchase of ATi but also their purported emphasis on this idea (i.e. marketing) of “platform”.

      Put simply, iNTEL is the karate chop strategy; AMD is the uppercut.

      The opportunity nVIDEA has as a fabless “odd man out” company stems from marrying HPC graphics with non-x86 RISC- read ARM- based architectures (i.e. future iterations of TEGRA) and enjoying efficiency scaling that way. Sure ATi- i mean AMD 😉 -could do that too but they’ve got their bets in the same x86 hedge as intel so I see more plausible market possibility of “team green” rallying the necessary power players to form a triumvirate that challenges the inevitability of x86 everywhere: Graphics-nVIDEA, IPC- ARM, and OEM- APPLE. (of course recent news indicates they might egregiously forfeit that potentiality and decide on fielding their own x86 chips- seriously Chen, either buy VIA =) or spend on ARM S.O.C.)

      As the computing power needs of the vast majority of consumers in the 21st century (read anyone with electricity) and the increasingly software dependent returns on Moore’s law level out against the various IPC’s, the opportunity for core-logic market relevance is ripe for the picking of any company with the foresight to capitalize on the intersect between performance, price, and subsequent inter-polarity.

      • ludi
      • 11 years ago

      Check your statistics again. The statement “The 9400M has caused Intel to lose 20% of their laptop core-logic business with the wholesale adoption of the 9400M in the new series of MacBooks” can only be true in terms of US mobile sales. Apple has much less than 20% of global sales.

        • Anomymous Gerbil
        • 11 years ago

        Hmm, logic check… I have no idea of market share numbers, but I think his statement can be true almost regardless of Apple’s global sales numbers.

        All he’s claiming is that of Intel’s sales of core-logic chips, 20% is now gone because of 9400M in MacBooks. Granted, given relatively low Apple sales figures compared to other PCs, the implication of his claim is that Intel’s core-logic sales are quite low.

        Hmm, my brain is twisted in on itself – does that follow?

    • Usacomp2k3
    • 11 years ago

    So this would look interesting next to the Wii (roughly the same size I’m guessing). White vs. black.

    • eitje
    • 11 years ago

    q[

    • ludi
    • 11 years ago

    Queue up the Hallelujah chourus?

    If they can keep this thing under $500…

      • UberGerbil
      • 11 years ago

      With a BD reader? I know they’re a lot cheaper than they used to be, but that’s still what, an $80 component to OEMs?

        • ludi
        • 11 years ago

        In fairness, I didn’t actually try to tally out the BOM, so you may be quite right. Here’s hoping, though.

    • UberGerbil
    • 11 years ago

    I wonder how this is going to be priced.

    If they offer one without the BR and in a color other than deathstar black, it would be an instant contender for my mother’s next machine.

      • BobbinThreadbare
      • 11 years ago

      If they are shooting for the living room with this device, deathstar black (the deathstar wasn’t black, it was grey. Vader was black) is a probably a good choice. Either that or silver.

        • UberGerbil
        • 11 years ago

        I agree. For the target market both BD and black (or silver, as you say) make perfect sense. (Though isn’t white the new black, what with the XBox and all?)

        I’m just looking at it for another use entirely. In fact, drop the BD drive and offer it in boring white or silver and it would be a fine minimal office machine.

        • Kurotetsu
        • 11 years ago

        My question is, if they are aiming this thing at the living room as a media center device, how are they going to handle output of DTS-HD Master and Dolby TrueHD? Looking at HTPC forums, that’s still a bitch to working correctly.

    • kamikaziechameleon
    • 11 years ago

    nice finally i can’t believe it took someone so long to make a nettop like this now i want to see a netbook with these stats and i’ll get myself a new one.

      • Kurotetsu
      • 11 years ago

      Eh, as long as netbooks remain stuck on worthless resolutions like 1024 x 600, I won’t be getting one no matter how awesome its internals are. If they take MSI’s approach with this and crank up the res to, say, 1280 x 800 or 1280 x 1024…..

        • Farting Bob
        • 11 years ago

        We arent talking about netbooks here.

          • Kurotetsu
          • 11 years ago

          Try reading Kamikazie’s post?

          l[<--make a nettop like this now i want to see a netbook with these stats and i'll get myself a new one.<]l

      • ludi
      • 11 years ago

      Great news! They already exist, albeit cleverly disguised as “Thin & Light”. Be prepared to pay royally for the privilege of having all that hardware in a small form factor unit, though.

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