Purported ‘Core i5’ specs, prices leak out

Intel’s mainstream Core i7 derivatives could cost as little as $196 when they come out in the latter part of this year. That’s according to the folks at HKEPC, who claim to have obtained a list of the upcoming CPUs and their prices from sources within Taiwan’s motherboard industry. The list covers both Lynnfield, the Core i7’s less upscale little brother, and Clarksfield, which will bring the same architecture to notebooks.

The automated Google translation is a tad difficult to decipher, but here’s our understanding of what HKEPC expects in the Lynnfield lineup:

Model Clock speed Top “Turbo” speed L3 cache Hyper-Threading TDP Price
? 2.66GHz 3.2GHz 8MB No ≤ 95W $196
? 2.80GHz 3.46GHz 8MB Yes ≤ 95W $284
? 3.46GHz 3.60GHz 8MB Yes ≤ 95W $562

So far, we know for a fact that Lynnfield CPUs will have four cores, will include dual-channel DDR3 memory controllers, and will fit in a new socket alongside future Intel 5-series chipsets. HKEPC’s specs and prices seem plausible, although the maximum Turbo Boost speeds look a little high compared to the Core i7’s. Perhaps Lynnfield’s supposedly lower thermal envelopes have something do with that, though.

As for Clarksfield, HKPEC says Intel is planning three variants: a 1.6GHz model priced at $364, a 1.73GHz model priced at $546, and a 2GHz “Extreme” part with a $1,054 price tag. Reportedly, all three chips will have Hyper-Threading support and 35W thermal envelopes. Oh, and in case the low clock speeds aren’t a big enough hint, these will be quad-core offerings.

Intel’s official launch time frame for these two processors is the second half of this year, but recent reports from the rumor mill suggest we could see them as late as October.

Comments closed
    • Calle2003
    • 14 years ago

    3.46GHz is supposed to be 2.93GHz, pretty big r[<*[

    • MadManOriginal
    • 14 years ago

    I think you may have overdone the dramatic effect with AGP 4x though. ;)It’s got a 1GB/s data rate which is equivalent to PCIe 1.x in a 4x lane configuration. Iirc PCIe 1.x 8x slots could show small performance drops versus 16x slots. PCIe is also important a lot for multi-GPU configurations as you probably know but that’s another topic.

    • MadManOriginal
    • 14 years ago

    Teste. I was just doing some thinking. I guess you mean where you say ‘enough ram’ in your post although you didn’t specify video ram that’s probably what you meant.

    • MadManOriginal
    • 14 years ago

    Until you run out of onboard video RAM and have to use system RAM for textures. It might help a lot in those situations if the NB in the chipset is higher bandwidth or lower latency than a separate NB.

    • shiznit
    • 14 years ago

    Don’t you mean number crunching power of the SIMD units? Bandwidth is hardly a problem with 512bit buses or GDDR5, and you can always lower the resolution/AA, etc…

    I was wondering if the reduced latencies from the controller being on-die would translate into any real performance increase.

    • ish718
    • 14 years ago

    Prices on LGA 1366 mobos and CPUs won’t go down as fast as you think, they won’t be as mass produced either considering LGA1366 is not a mainstream platform. LGA1156 is mainstream so it will definitely be mass produced in larger quantities than LGA1366 at a smaller cost with more profit(cheaper platform=more sales).

    • ish718
    • 14 years ago

    Simple. It is redundant for most applications. Especially considering it is a mainstream desktop product, NOT a server/workstation CPU.

    • ish718
    • 14 years ago

    Cheaper LGA 1156 motherboards as well…

    • shiznit
    • 14 years ago

    well I’m not waiting for Core i5 now. Why would I wait for a $200 core i5 with artificially disabled SMT when I can get a core i7 920 for $230 now at Microcenter? The cheapest core i5 worth getting is apparently gonna be $50 more!

    I really wanted to go the core i5 route because I have no need for 3-channel memory or 2×16 PCI (SLI/xFire are crap) but what’s the point of waiting to not save any money? The $50 I save with getting a 920 microcenter should make up for most of the cost of having to buy a x58 board vs p55 and 3-channel ram kits can be found for silly prices.

    I do wonder if the on-die PCI-E controller will improve gpu performance though…

    Well looks like my E8400/8800gt system is going to a friend soon and the pc building fun begins again.

    • Krogoth
    • 14 years ago

    i5 are cheaper to make in bulk quantities. Average joe certainly does not need triple-channel DDR3 or the other features that LGA1366 offers.

    • DaveJB
    • 14 years ago

    I remember when Intel tried to kill overclocking with the 915 and 925 chipsets and their “10% overclock” limit. All it did in that case was slightly delay things until users and the motherboard manufacturers figured out how to work around the lock, and then it was business as usual. The same thing will probably happen here, meaning that life will perhaps suck for early adopters, but soon enough we’ll be seeing uber-clocked Core i5s.

    • sergeant_skyes
    • 14 years ago

    so i think the performance delta between the phenom 2’s and upcoming corei5’s will be almost similar.lets wait and see…..

    • sergeant_skyes
    • 14 years ago

    well the clock speeds of core i7 and core i5 are almost similar. but these are not 32nm parts so i think that it has to be the reduced “uncore” speeds (as intel may call it) made intel get the mentioned TDP. if then i expect it to be about 2 ghz just as the latest phenoms

    • Meadows
    • 14 years ago

    Ignorance. When will you leave us?

    • Kurkotain
    • 14 years ago

    §[<http://ark.intel.com/cpu.aspx?groupID=36727<]§ i checked, its the qx9300 at above 1k although i would doubt the need for such a processor on the mobile front, since having one of those and use it for things like photoshop (since most people don't do number crunching on their laptops) would need a couple of fairly powerful video cards and you jnow how that goes on the mobile...

    • Krogoth
    • 14 years ago

    I suspect that you can overclock the i5 like the non-XE i7s (their cache and IMC speeds are locked). However, the cache and memory controller speeds on i5 will probably operate at a lower speed. It will end-up hurting overclocked 15’s performance when it is pushed aggressively.

    • FuturePastNow
    • 14 years ago

    It is a quad-core, though. Its price is in line with current high-end mobile chips. And there will always be cheaper processors.

    • MadManOriginal
    • 14 years ago

    That would just push me to giving a ‘+’ to AMD when comparing builds. The ease and quantity of overclocking is a big reason that C2D did so well with enthusiasts.

    • holophrastic
    • 14 years ago

    You’re incorrect. It’s not that games use 8 threads, it’s that they use more than two. First off, many of us have “background” tasks that are more significant than old-school foreground tasks. A download, a torrent, some music, something compiling, something rendering, something being monitored. Maybe on a second monitor. Playing a game while something is rendering for 24 hours, or 2 hours, is perfectly legitimate. The additional cores ensure that my computer can do six other things while littel-ol’-me plays a game.

    But also, don’t forget that operating systems do some fancy things. A discrete sound card has no trouble doing some fancy things during a game. Another core ensures the game doesn’t suffer. Same goes for a fancy network stack that the game may also use.

    Today, not so much. In two months, would anyone be surprised if windows 7 took the sound and network and threw them onto other cores for actual processing? What about when a game decides to play an mpeg embedded on a surface somewhere? Might as well throw video playback onto a non-primary core.

    There are any number of things that /could/ be pulled from a game onto a core. In any event, there are many other things for those cores to do.

    • toyota
    • 14 years ago

    hyperthreading does just as much harm as good at least when it comes to games.

    also is that table even right? 2.66, 2.80 and then bam 3.46. that 3.46 has to be a mistake.

    • armistitiu
    • 14 years ago

    8? They’re barely using 2 threads. It’s gonna take a few more years before we see games that use 8 threads. I find this HyperThreading thing unnecessary for the desktop side. What’s really nice about these CPU’s is the TDP <95W …wow.

    • ssidbroadcast
    • 14 years ago

    80% of the time, it works /[

    • Ryhadar
    • 14 years ago

    Isn’t that with Turbo Mode enabled though?

    • Ryhadar
    • 14 years ago

    I hope this doesn’t start some huge debate but I had heard that the core i5’s will not be able to be overclocked by the user (although clearly the turbo mode does it by itself).

    There’s an employee from Intel that posts on xtremesystems.org that is basically saying since the reference clock resides on chip now Intel locks it. He also says that it makes sense because Intel already created a overclocking friendly platform and that’s the Core i7.

    • Meadows
    • 14 years ago

    That would not be like him.

    • Meadows
    • 14 years ago

    My time is valuable.

    • Chillectric
    • 14 years ago

    About 7% increase in performance per clock on average in a variety of applications (highly multithreaded and not).

    In comparison, on average, Yorkfield is about 2.5% better than Kentsfield per clock, and Bloomfield without HT is 9% better than Yorksfield per clock.

    §[<http://www.hwbox.gr/showthread.php?t=3253<]§

    • eitje
    • 14 years ago

    80% of YOUR time.

    • eitje
    • 14 years ago

    i think he’s accusing you of doing all of those things while reading Tech Report.

    • Meadows
    • 14 years ago

    “Huge”?
    Is this like the “significant performance boost” between videocards that’s actually 2 fps?

    I’d like you to prove how huge it is.

    • MadManOriginal
    • 14 years ago

    Opposite of head of the class. Just for not knowing that you get detention too!

    • Flying Fox
    • 14 years ago

    Only if the extra threads don’t cause resource contention that is not shareable in an SMT context.

    • Chillectric
    • 14 years ago

    Until you run into an application that can utilize more than 4 threads… then the benefit of HT is huge…

    • Meadows
    • 14 years ago

    Generating history and scratch data is disk-intensive, but don’t try telling me that filters and operations stress your HD.

    • Krogoth
    • 14 years ago

    Photoshop is mostly I/O bounded, unless you are running and working with several instances of it at once.

    • Ravioli
    • 14 years ago

    I wish I was little bit taller
    I wish I was a baller
    I wish I had a girl who looked good
    I would call her
    I wish I had a rabbit in a hat with a bat and a ’64 Impala

    • khands
    • 14 years ago

    Slowly chanting “Bulldozer….Bulldozer….Bulldozer”

    • Meadows
    • 14 years ago

    Simple, 80% of the time it doesn’t do anything.

    • Meadows
    • 14 years ago

    Could be, over here it was more like a matter of choice. Although the last row(s) have been repeatedly taken by individuals predisposed to cheat, eat, listen to music or draw porn while a lesson was underway.

    • Chillectric
    • 14 years ago

    No hyperthreading? Why would they even disable that?

    • Ravioli
    • 14 years ago

    “Back of the class”?

    Yea, students who didn’t pay attention in the classroom were sent to the back row of the classroom because since they weren’t paying attention, they didn’t care and thus it was viewed that those seats be given to the students who did care.

    EDIT: I think that’s where the saying comes from.

    • Flying Fox
    • 14 years ago

    Cyril, other than the Clarksfield in BGA packaging and slated for a Q3 release, you pretty much nailed all the information in the original article. 😉

    • Meadows
    • 14 years ago

    “Back of the class”?

    • Meadows
    • 14 years ago

    What if you render or use Photoshop or things like that? Commonplace applications that benefit.

    • Flying Fox
    • 14 years ago

    There is not x32 PCIe slot on regular motherboards. Also why would mainstream users need Crossfire?

    • mczak
    • 14 years ago

    It can split the x16 pcie link into 2 x8 links. That should be enough for most people if you really need 2 graphic cards, since there doesn’t seem to be much of a performance hit.

    • MadManOriginal
    • 14 years ago

    But you still failed utterly at CPU geekery and basic reading!! Back of the class for you!

    • Krogoth
    • 14 years ago

    HT is overrated to begin with. Unless, you are doing heavy-duty server workload. It is not worth it nor most multi-threaded programs are optimized enough to take advantage of HT.

    • Meadows
    • 14 years ago

    I know, I edited the comment immediately after posting as soon as I checked for a second time.

    • MadManOriginal
    • 14 years ago

    Read carefully silly, Lynnfields are quad core.

    • grantmeaname
    • 14 years ago

    aboogaboogabooga nevermind

    • MadManOriginal
    • 14 years ago

    For me to do a platform upgrade from a s775 e8400 oc’d it will have to be more than a non-HT quad core which unfortunately would mean a $300 CPU (but who knows about street prices.) I’ve done that price twice since C2D came out (e6600 then q6600) and am done on spending money on the upgrade treadmill for this hobby, fun as it was at the time. If I wanted to get a non-HT quad core I’d just scrounge the used CPU market for a Penryn quad and keep the rest of my system.

    What would interest me more would be lower priced dual cores with HT. Most likely I’ll wait until there’s a platform with next-gen stuff like USB 3.0 and SATA 600Mb/s.

    • Meadows
    • 14 years ago

    200 dollars for an overhyped thing /[

    • DaveJB
    • 14 years ago

    That’s all most people will ever need. Those who are performance hungry enough to want SLI or Crossfire with two 16x slots will likely be going for Core i7 anyway.

    • Ushio01
    • 14 years ago

    How are those prices mainstream? I thought core i5 would be much cheaper with clockspeeds comparable to the Q8000 series because those specs look like they could match i7 unless the loss of 1 channel of memory and QPI make a lot more difference to performance than i originally thought.

    • ish718
    • 14 years ago

    That 2.66ghz core i5 for $196 will be the sweet spot for gamers. No HT, not a problem since no game can utilize 8 threads *effectively

    • 0g1
    • 14 years ago

    I don’t know who would buy into this platform. If my memory serves correctly, it only supports one 16x PCI-e slot for a graphics card. Then when the Westmere version comes out, it will only be dual core with a graphics module on the CPU … which will most likely be slow. Slower than nVidia’s onboard graphics most likely. It’d be nice if it was faster tho, I guess. But still, this platform is pretty limiting for graphics cards … (not 32x and only one 16x).

    • UberGerbil
    • 14 years ago

    Intel is pricing the Clarksfield chips according to the old Core 2 pricing, where quads were a premium processor. And I suppose with mobile dual-core (and even quad) Penryns still carrying the mainstream (and Atom and CULV “Pentiums” taking the low end), they can get away with that for a while. The Core 2 Quads generally have 45W TDPs I believe, so with Clarksfield you are getting both more performance and better battery life for your money (assuming you actually need a mobile quad in the first place). The mobile Core 2 Duos are generally in the 25W range, though, so that’s still going to be choice if battery life is important. For the people who aren’t just buying Netbooks.

    I think there was a quad Penryn “XE” mobile chip that initially cost over $1K, but I’m not sure if it showed up in any actual machines.

    • Gerbil Jedidiah
    • 14 years ago

    AMD needs a hat… with a BIG RABBIT in it. (keeping fingers crossed)

    • Vasilyfav
    • 14 years ago

    A 1.73GHZ notebook part for 546$ ? Sounds pretty damn steep if you ask me. I bought my whole notebook for that price.

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