Ubuntu Linux 9.04 hits the web

Sticking tightly to its six-month development cycle, Canonical has released the latest version of its Ubuntu Linux distribution. Ubuntu 9.04 brings a pretty broad cross-section of improvements, from shorter boot times to better out-of-the-box support for AMD graphics processors.

According to the official release notes, Ubuntu 9.04 includes the latest GNOME desktop environment, version 2.26, together with a new integrated disc burning application, Brasero, and a new configuration tool for multi-monitor setups. Canonical has also added the freshest version of X.Org, and it says the updated non-proprietary driver for AMD GPUs now has fewer bugs, potentially improved performance, and better hardware support.

Additionally, the release notes claim “significantly improved boot performance,” a new notification system, Ext4 file system support, an “easy-to-deploy mail server stack,” and Eucalyptus, an open-source cloud-computing technology that “enables you to use your own servers to deploy, experiment and test your own private cloud that matches the Amazon EC2 API.”

You can download Ubuntu 9.04 here in desktop, “Netbook Remix,” and server flavors. If you don’t feel like partitioning your hard drive to try the new OS, you don’t have to. The Ubuntu installation disc doubles as a live CD, and you can also install Ubuntu from Windows like a simple application. You’re free to use your virtual machine, too.

Comments closed
    • axeman
    • 14 years ago

    I’m impressed with it so far too. 8.10 still feels like a beta on my old Dell Latitude without getting into the specifics of issues that still persist even with the latest updates. Already this release seems to be more polished than 8.10 was with all current updates. 8.10 = lots more bugs just to gain a few more up-to-date packages over 8.04 LTS was hardly worth it. Now we have some significant improvements in UI, boot times, without a bunch of broken stuff that should have never made it to release, at least in my experience on some of my hardware. The desktop seems a little less responsive compared to Hardy, but so far, no issues, and some nifty new stuff; have to try it on some better hardware next.

    • just brew it!
    • 14 years ago

    Oh, and I forgot to mention… I’m posting from an Ubuntu 9.04 system I set up earlier this evening. It’s just a bare mobo and hard drive sitting on a table at this point, but if it seems stable (and I have no reason to believe it won’t be), I plan to swap the system drive into my main desktop (which is currently running 8.10).

    So far, it looks nice. Boot and application loading times are improved. They’ve also fixed what I considered to be some annoying regressions which appeared in the 8.10 user interface. The latest OpenOffice 3.0.1 is also included now, which is another plus.

    I also plan to play around with the compositing desktop (Compiz), to see if it is ready for prime time yet (IMO it was borderline in the past couple of releases, which led me to turn off desktop effects).

    • just brew it!
    • 14 years ago

    While I agree that the best way is to get stuff from their repositories, I must say that I’ve also had reasonably good luck on Ubuntu with installing .deb files from third parties as well. In general the package management seems to be better than on Fedora, where package management was still a bit of a mess the last time I tried it (Fedora 8, IIRC).

    With Ubuntu now firmly established as the most popular desktop Linux distro, I think we’ll see more third parties providing Ubuntu-specific packages.

    • FubbHead
    • 14 years ago

    After running Kubuntu 9.04 for a while, I must say it’s quite amazing! Fast, light-weight and sassy lookin’.

    • Game_boy
    • 14 years ago

    I have tried it. And it is slower in various applications, especially Windows games I run under Wine.

    I’m not saying it’s buggy or even that they should have done a better job.

    • FubbHead
    • 14 years ago

    Packages distributed by Ubuntu aren’t compiled anymore (have they ever?). But I still don’t agree with the extremely centralized distribution. If you want to install an application without much hassle, and be somewhat confident that it’ll work, you pretty much have to get everything from their repositories.

    • AMDisDEC
    • 14 years ago

    I’m really liking 9.04.
    It’s the best release yet. Smooth, stable, and fast.

    • matic
    • 14 years ago

    I seldom play UrbanTerror on Linux, I just played it with the live version of Ubuntu 9.04 (the game reside on the hard drive) and it works! It’s a fast paced FPS and I enjoy it even if I’m thirty-sev… Nevermind, games are for Windows 🙁

    • dustyjamessutton
    • 14 years ago

    They weren’t kidding about improved boot times, it’s like night and day. 🙂

    • atryus28
    • 14 years ago

    Don’t forget there are some .deb packages which install just as easy like world of Goo and some other things, webmin etc.

    • atryus28
    • 14 years ago

    yes, but unfortunately you are not using an ATI card. As I said it was no problem with dual monitors and 2D, it’s once I install the ATI drivers (9.4) that I can no longer use the extended monitor feature er rather xinerama multimonitor. 🙁 I am going to see if it is any different with Kubuntu this evening.

    • eitje
    • 14 years ago

    I am a fan of the Introversion crew, yes. 🙂

    But it’s actually true that they run better! I was able to get almost 60 FPS in Darwinia using an EPIA board and a Geforce FX5200, years ago:
    §[<https://techreport.com/forums/viewtopic.php?p=546941#p546941<]§ I didn't get anywhere near that with Windows.

    • drsauced
    • 14 years ago

    Just installed it on an old Dell Dimension, and it just plum worked. Color me dazzled.

    I didn’t have a spare monitor to use, so I hooked it up to the TV, and it didn’t have any problems with that at all. It does want a logoff/login to change resolutions, whereas I seem to recall the earlier versions didn’t ask that.

    I was supposed to install XP Home on this machine (it’s for a friend’s daughter), but now I’m seriously considering the idea of leaving it with Ubuntu!

    • dlenmn
    • 14 years ago

    They still have a separate kde3.5 version, but the main version is kde4.

    • Trymor
    • 14 years ago

    That sounds a little like Fanboyism 😉 Just glancing at the game shots, it almost looks as if those games were developed on Linux.

    • eitje
    • 14 years ago

    Most every Introversion game (Darwinia, Uplink, Defcon) has a linux version.

    §[<http://www.introversion.co.uk/<]§ And most every Linux version runs better than the Windows version. :)

    • dustyjamessutton
    • 14 years ago

    Well, I am downloading Ubuntu now. After reading about the improved support for my ATI card,(Radeon HD 4850) I’m going to give it a try. Last time I ran Ubuntu, I wasn’t able to set the overscan on my display at all. My sound didn’t work either, VIA onboard hi-def audio, but I didn’t mess with it much either trying to get it to work. I don’t play games much anymore, so if things work, maybe it is time for me to consider Linux, we shall see. 🙂

    • Dirge
    • 14 years ago

    You should try PC-BSD they have something like what you are describing.

    §[<http://www.pcbsd.org/content/view/20/26/<]§

    • nerdrage
    • 14 years ago

    What exactly have you been compiling? Maybe years and years ago that was necessary, but it’s rare these days to need to compile anything unless you’re doing something highly specialized. Have you ever used package managers (apt, yum)? Most things install (and uninstall) much faster than Windows, and without a reboot for most everything except kernel updates.

    • Ethyriel
    • 14 years ago

    Not only should we be able to close it (say with a close button or middle click), but we should be able to click on the notification to interact with the program. Say, if I click on a Pidgin message notification, it should open/raise the message window. I appreciate consistency in notifications, but that’s really all the new system has going for it. So far.

    • indeego
    • 14 years ago

    ↑g{<☺<}g

    • Skrying
    • 14 years ago

    9.04 has fixed the battery drain issues I had with the 8.10 release at least. That’s about what my opinion on it comes down to. The notification system change is nice but it still has issues and is under par compared to OS X and Windows. I should be able to close a notification instead of it deciding when it close.

    On another note, I finally tried Kubuntu for a full day. My biggest thought? I really dislike KDE. It has some really nice features in some areas and in others it feels like it’s stuck in ’95. Just connecting to a wireless network took way to long. In Ubuntu/Gnome it is literally done in under 30 seconds, it almost feels like an ordeal in KDE.

    • just brew it!
    • 14 years ago

    Have you tried any of the recent versions of Ubuntu? Their repositories have thousands of packages in them, including some fairly obscure/esoteric stuff. It’s all already ported to run under Ubuntu. Unless you’re installing a /[

    • nerdrage
    • 14 years ago

    What games are you trying to play on Linux anyway? Games are for Windows…

    FWIW, the closed-source ATI drivers work fine for 2D in 8.10.

    • dustyjamessutton
    • 14 years ago

    I will switch to Linux once all the programs are installable via installshield wizard or something similar. I despise having to compile so many things and there is no guarantee the program will run.

    • eitje
    • 14 years ago

    Hmm!

    I’ve always <3ed KDE, but I switched to Xubuntu a while back because of the KDE4 transition.

    I think I’ll give K9.04 a shot, then!

    • Meadows
    • 14 years ago

    Lol, good one.

    • cheesyking
    • 14 years ago

    I’m not sure it’s a driver issue as such, IIRC you’re limited to 2048 on Windows too with intel graphics.

    • nick58b
    • 14 years ago

    Yeah, I’d go with it being an Intel video driver issue too. I have dual 24″ (1920×1200) monitors on a GeForce 8600 GT.

    • Skrying
    • 14 years ago

    Kubuntu is on KDE 4.2 now.

    • eitje
    • 14 years ago

    is that on KDE4 yet, or do they still have different distros for KDE4/KDE3?

    • Veerappan
    • 14 years ago

    The OPEN source drivers in 9.04 don’t support 3D for r600/r700, but the fglrx drivers do. If I remember correctly, a 9.4 beta fglrx was provided to Canonical before the 9.04 release, so if you need 3D acceleration for your newer AMD/ATI card, just use those (or upgrade to the official 9.4 binary drivers).

    • Veerappan
    • 14 years ago

    For Windows, ATI switched to a longer release cycle for a legacy driver, but it’s different for their Linux strategy.

    For Linux, AMD/ATI has been working on getting the open source drivers to a state that they would be a viable replacement for the closed source fglrx. AMD/ATI has released hardware specifications and code to help with this, and has also been employing developers to work on the open source drivers.

    So while fglrx has dropped support for these older chips, it’s not like they won’t work anymore at all. It just means you have to use the open source driver instead of a closed source driver.

    Whether this is a good thing or bad depends on your perspective. The performance of the open source drivers is currently not quite as good (although it will improve somewhat over the next 6 months due to a lot of work over the last year nearing completion), but the open drivers are also not entirely dependent on AMD/ATI spotting/fixing bugs for us, and it also means that we don’t have to wait for a new fglrx release to be compatible with the latest kernel/X release before upgrading our systems.

    • Forge
    • 14 years ago

    Wrong. This new Ubuntu will support your card BETTER than the old ATI binary drivers.

    The drivers in 9.04 don’t support 3D acceleration on R700, but I believe they do R600, and I KNOW that R500 and below are working well.

    Try it, THEN bash it. Way more credible.

    • Veerappan
    • 14 years ago

    r[

    • Bluekkis
    • 14 years ago

    2 displays complete with 3D support and compiz, no problems. 24″ + 20″ for total resolution of 3520×1200 on GF9600GT.

    • d2brothe
    • 14 years ago

    Perhaps they should get the coffin as well…:P

    • ssidbroadcast
    • 14 years ago

    You’re going to need a lot more nails.

    • Game_boy
    • 14 years ago

    No, that’s the problem. AMD drops support = driver never works again. Ubuntu comes out every 6 months and if you want newer software you have to upgrade, and the driver needs to be updated in parallel (for the X Server support) or it won’t even boot. And AMD said they won’t update it ever again even for new X Server support.

    • Game_boy
    • 14 years ago

    The ATI situation has changed dramatically in the last year and a half. Again, for out of box experience with Linux, ATI is the best choice as their open driver supports 2D and 3D on all current cards and is maintained by both AMD and the community. Nvidia has an obfuscated that only does basic 2D and is fully dependent on Nvidia for new code.

    • atryus28
    • 14 years ago

    2 19″ LCD’s so 2560×1024. I really hope that they have not decided to limit the resolution to something lower. I have been using these since 2005 and not had this problem.

    It actually even see’s my two monitors in CCC but tells me I can not use multi monitor because I only have one. I haven’t really looked into it too much yet though. I figured I would just wait for the official release today.

    • atryus28
    • 14 years ago

    wrong reply sorry

    • malicious
    • 14 years ago

    I harbor no particular fondness for MS but it’s always amusing to read the predictions of its demise whenever a new Linux distro is released. Not unlike how this will be the year Linux finally takes over the desktop, just like every previous year for the last decade.

    • bthylafh
    • 14 years ago

    You two with working effects on dual screens, what resolutions are your monitors?

    • indeego
    • 14 years ago

    Not saying much. Intel can barely write drivers for Microsoft OS’sg{<.<}g

    • atryus28
    • 14 years ago

    I have been using dual monitors and 3D with Ubuntu for quite a while. Although I have a problem with the new ATI drivers and dual monitors. It was with the beta last week but it was the final Ati 9.4 drivers. 🙁 first time I have had this issue actually. It has nothing to do with 3D either but the ATI driver.

    • FubbHead
    • 14 years ago

    The effects desktop is much faster, as far as I can tell. But I dunno about the bugginess. It’s still appears to be a bit unstable.

    • bthylafh
    • 14 years ago

    I can’t. It seems to be a limit in your combined screens’ horizontal resolution. I’ve got a 1440×900 beside a 1280×800. I /think/ the maximum horizontal res is 2048.

    If it makes a difference, it’s on an Intel GMA 950.

    • nick58b
    • 14 years ago

    I’ve been running dual monitors with all the 3D desktop effects for years (on nvidia video cards).

    • jrr
    • 14 years ago

    Anyone know if you can now use dual display and hardware accelerated desktop effects simultaneously?

    I’m disappointed to hear that about the X1950, but mine has been gathering dust on the shelf for a little while so it’s not a huge deal. I continue to buy NV for this reason, among others.

    • indeego
    • 14 years ago

    Pretty slick. Installed in virtualbox in about 5 minutes. Reminds me of every other ubuntu ever madeg{<. <}g

    • cubical10
    • 14 years ago

    I see the releases page is up now. But no torrent for UNR !?

    • Left_SHifted
    • 14 years ago

    l[<"ATI -unlike NVIDIA- is submitting specs for even the most recent hardware AFAIK."<]l dunno about linux, but recently, my ati catalyst drivers have been going great guns(on my pc, 4850hd), whereas nvidia(in lappy, 9600gt) are struggling to play even gears of war, at decent fps......and yes it is a driver issue , forceware 179.04 palyed said game just fine.... ati's new driver 9.3-4 are even fully supporting windows 7 build 7057 that i am testing.(with good omprovements in games across the board), whereas nvidia are dtuck in beta land there as well....

    • poulpy
    • 14 years ago

    Did they drop those cards altogether?
    I thought they switched to a slower release pace (say every 6 months) as they would anyway not tweak performance any more and the legacy testing/validation was slowing them in their monthly release schedule.

    Obsolescence eventually leads to support being dropped with proprietary software that’s just the way it is, Nvidia did it too. The only way to prevent this is Free Software.

    Out of curiosity did you try the Free ones to see if you get playable frame rates?

    You should still be able to grab the latest working revision of the proprietary ones and get the same experience as updating every month as to be honest I’m not sure GPU makers make any changes on 3+ year old hardware, with most bugs squashed out and cards out there to be tested/developed against by studios since day one.

    • ChrisDTC
    • 14 years ago

    Yeah, torrents are there to be downloaded, but when I last looked their main download page had not been updated to show them.

    • poulpy
    • 14 years ago

    True NVIDIA -proprietary- drivers were years ahead ATI’s but that was years ago so you might want to have another look, things have changed there.
    Then there’s nothing like Free drivers to fight obsolescence and on this point ATI -unlike NVIDIA- is submitting specs for even the most recent hardware AFAIK.

    • 5150
    • 14 years ago

    I found them both on Ubuntu’s website and they downloaded in about 30 minutes.

    • PrincipalSkinner
    • 14 years ago

    Installing Kubuntu 9.04 on me laptop. Previous version looked very good but it was buggy. Hope they made it more stable.

    • clone
    • 14 years ago

    I just installed Ubuntu on an old socket A 1900+ with 512mb of ram for the first time and have to say I expected the experience to be far more problematic compared to the breeze that it was.

    I’ve been using it for day to day task for a few weeks and am now going to put in on a dual core with 2gb’s of ram 5200 X2 setup.

    really happy with the results so far.

    • bdwilcox
    • 14 years ago

    I’ve been using the 9.04 Beta for a while now and can say it’s the smoothest OS experience I’ve ever had. Once you set the Modern interface style and move the toolbars and icons around the desktop, it’s pretty much a no-brainer getting a Windows user accustomed to it. Very nice, and one more nail in the MS coffin.

    • cubical10
    • 14 years ago

    I wonder why they are not listing any torrent options for this release. Or at least not yet?
    §[<http://www.ubuntu.com/getubuntu/downloadmirrors#bt<]§

    • Swollen_Goat
    • 14 years ago

    I was buying parts for a customer PC just yesterday and I chose Nvidia for that very reason. I always set up a small partition for Linux on my custom builds so my clients can still use PC if they bork Widows up.
    Too many problems with ATI and Linux recently.

    • Game_boy
    • 14 years ago

    Yes, I meant the proprietary. AMD’s open support is much better than Nvidia since they released specs and funded development – I’d recommend AMD graphics over Nvidia to any Linux user not playing 3D games.

    But open drivers never have the budget to be able to do all of the optimisation that goes in a binary one. This isn’t AMD’s fault (but dropping the binary support is.)

    • Trymor
    • 14 years ago

    They did? Well, I guess I am glad I quit being an ATI ATI ATI (not AMD…heh) fanboy since the first All-in-Wonder card.

    AMD/ATI – one of the big draws of Linux in general is the ability to run on old hardware. Your decision to drop ‘legacy’ support will lose you business.

    I now own 4 Nvidia cards (but I don’t like their chipsets particularily).

    Linux has BEEN THE REASON I started buying Nvidia, and I think AMD (cough) better wake up…

    Hmm, all that being said, are you talking about ATI’s driver, and not the non-proprietary driver built in to Ubuntu (I would assume so)?

    • Game_boy
    • 14 years ago

    It refers to the fact it’s default in GNOME and therefore better integrated. Previously it was something Ubuntu added on top.

    • bthylafh
    • 14 years ago

    It’s the default now, instead of the cheesy CD-burner utility built into the file manager.

    • Trymor
    • 14 years ago

    Well, that explains why my 9.04 beta is getting a bunch of misses in the upgrade manager.

    • brm001
    • 14 years ago

    Brasero is hardly new. Maybe something about the way it’s included is new, but it’s been in a couple Ubuntu releases, I think.

    • Game_boy
    • 14 years ago

    I’m annoyed that AMD dumped support for my 3 and a half year old card, the X1950 Pro, in their graphics driver. That means I can’t run 3D games at any decent speed on this new Ubuntu.

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