Unannounced Core i7s show up in listings

Some online retailers just love jumping the gun on unannounced products. PC World reports that this time, a couple of e-tailers have posted listings for Core i7 processors that are nowhere to be found in Intel’s official price list (PDF) or CPU database.

The two sites, PCs For Everyone and Provantage, both let customers pre-order a Core i7-975 Extreme Edition with a 3.33GHz clock speed and a price tag over the $1,000 mark. The CPU otherwise looks to have the same specs as the current Core i7-965, which runs at a slightly lower 3.2GHz.

PCs For Everyone also lists a more affordable Core i7-950. Clocked at 3.06GHz with no Extreme Edition label, this CPU is up for pre-order at $649. PC World speculates that the i7-950 could replace the current $560 Core i7-940 altogether—a switch that would leave a bigger gap between the cheapest of the bunch, the $280 Core i7-920, and the next step up.

Intel’s plans might come to light officially before too long. PCs For Everyone quotes a May 31 availability date for both of the unannounced CPUs, while ProVantage claims to have 25 Core i7-975 Extreme Edition chips in stock already.

Comments closed
    • michael_d
    • 13 years ago

    I posted a thread about this days before techreports.com officially acknowledged it. 😉

    • maroon1
    • 13 years ago

    The i5 should perform almost as good as i7 clock for clock. Because the only advantage that i7 have is tripple-channel memory which doesn’t make much

    • UberGerbil
    • 13 years ago

    Exactly my point. The market segments are based on total system cost, and pin count indirectly drives that. More memory channels, more motherboard layers… higher platform price.

    • d0g_p00p
    • 13 years ago

    Last I checked, Intel could care less about pin count to save costs. It’s the mobo manufactures that now have to carry the price of the pin count.

    • sroylance
    • 13 years ago

    Anybody from the Boston area probably knows PC’s for everyone. They used to have a store in Cambridge across the street from the old Lechemere, and were called Unitek before that. I used to go to Unitek on my way home from high school to check out 386 motherboards and copy shareware floppies from their huge library.

    • UberGerbil
    • 13 years ago

    The i7 was always intended to be the high-end workstation chip; but Intel realized they could get the crazy enthusiasts to pay them to beta test the architecture by introducing it first. The real product segment Intel was (initially) targeting was the DP server market — where Opteron had been hurting them most — and for that i7 was in many ways simply the test mule: it used the same socket, and even had a second dormant QPI link. If not for that, the i7 might never have existed as a separate “desktop” line; it’s fundamentally a server chip. Once they have extended the architecture up to the EX and down to the i5 (and below), the lineup will, as you say, finally “make sense.”

    • UberGerbil
    • 13 years ago
    • UberGerbil
    • 13 years ago

    Push away consumers? Most consumers don’t even know a CPU goes in a socket, let alone that there are different ones. Most consumers never upgrade the CPU in their machines — when it gets too old and virus-infested, they get a new machine. (And considering that consumers are increasingly buying note/net-books instead of desktops, swapping CPUs isn’t even an option). Socket compatibility is purely an issue for the enthusiast niche (and OEM inventories). So you can protest all you want, and take your business elsewhere — AMD has a pretty good socket compatibility story ATM, though that will change eventually — but Intel isn’t going to notice or care.

    And it’s actually worse than you think, even setting aside the Xeon sockets (771 currently; Socket LS [1567] coming for the Nehalem EX). Right now there is 1366 for workstations (and extreme enthusiasts — /[http://news.softpedia.com/news/Intel-Socket-LGA-1155-1156-and-1567-Pictures-Leaked-103939.shtml<]§ It's possible Intel will change its mind now that it's pulled in the 32nm schedule, but apparently the plan was/is to use that socket for the i5 variants with package-integrated graphics (aka Clarkdale). And while I can accept there's some justification for having separate sockets for the high end (where more pins are required) and the low end (where keeping the pin count down helps do the same for costs) and even a third happy medium in the middle, it's pretty apparent the H1/H2 distinction is nothing but arbitrary market segmentation. You should probably reserve your outrage for that.

    • sotti
    • 13 years ago

    No that’s an i3 (dual core i5). The i5 will be quad core.

    • bcronce
    • 13 years ago

    from what I understand, the i5 will have 2 of the 4 cores disabled AND 1/2 of the L3 cache also

    • superjawes
    • 13 years ago

    775 will probably be around for say…”average” consumers. Enthusiasts will want to sign on with the new platforms, but dropping prices for our old Pentiums and Core 2’s should appease these buyers until the new sockets can start competing in that price range.

    A lot of consumers keep their systems until they need a whole new box anyway.

    • kcarlile
    • 13 years ago

    Antares Digital also has them listed, with the 950s in stock. I almost ordered one just for the hell of it instead of my 920 D0, but then I realized I wasn’t insane.

    • flip-mode
    • 13 years ago

    I didn’t know about 771. I think 775 will be around longer than it first seems unless they bring Celerons and Pentium Dual cores over.

    • moshpit
    • 13 years ago

    i5 also lacks QPI and uses PCIe instead to connect to the system and memory, which will mean lower system bandwidth to go with the lowered memory bandwidth of i5’s dual channel setup. Also, some i5 lower end models will lack HT as well.

    • moshpit
    • 13 years ago

    3 at the same time? What 3? When socket 1156 comes out, it’ll technically be 4. Socket 771, socket 775, socket 1156 and socket 1366. But, only 2 will emerge from that short overlap. Sockets 1156 and 1366 will continue, 771 and 775 will cease to exist over time. Having 2 sockets works just fine as they’ve proven over the last 4 years of socket 775/771’s life. Since 1156 replaces 775, and 1366 replaces 771, I’d say they have it just right.

    • kamikaziechameleon
    • 13 years ago

    i think intel trying to push three consumer sockets simultaneously is going to fragment it’s market to much and push away consumers who don’t want to be pigeon holed into a single socket with such narrow possibilities, i don’t plan on buying into the i7 or i5 line until intel resolves this issue.

    • oMa
    • 13 years ago

    What is the difference between Core i5 an core i7? Only the tripple channel and i5’s ddr3 1333 support?

    • Game_boy
    • 13 years ago

    “a switch that would leave a bigger gap between the cheapest of the bunch, the $280 Core i7-920, and the next step up.”

    Until Core i5 is introduced.

    It seems Intel wants to leave i7 in the $500 and above range and have i5 between $200 and $500. I imagine the 920 will be EOLd in favour of i5. Then they’ll introduce 32nm derivatives from the bottom up to replace Core 2 with Clarkdale, then i5 with a 32nm quad, then i7 with the 6-core Gulftown.

    /[

    • MadManOriginal
    • 13 years ago

    These are ‘old’ news, in fact didn’t TR have a news piece about them already?

    • GFC
    • 13 years ago

    Its a speed bump. Big deal. Give meh my core i5!

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This

Share this post with your friends!