Samsung flaunts ‘green’ 32GB DDR3 module

Only three months have passed since Samsung began shipping its first 16GB DDR3 modules. Already, though, the company has one-upped itself with a module that packs double that capacity—the first of its kind in the industry, Samsung claims.

How do you stick 32GB worth of memory chips onto a single DIMM? Like so, the official press release explains:

The new 32GB registered dual inline memory module (RDIMM) consists of 72 4Gb DDR3 chip dies produced using Samsung’s 50-nanometer class DRAM production technology. A row of nine quad-die package (QDP) 16Gb DDR3s are mounted on each side of the printed circuit board for a collective 32GB, highly compact configuration.

The announcement doesn’t quote a top speed, but it says the module runs at a voltage setting of just 1.35V—10% lower than the 1.5V default for DDR3 memory. 10% is apparently enough for Samsung to play the "green" card, touting the module as "eco-sensitive."

From a more practical standpoint, this 32GB monster DIMM can supposedly "not only reduce electricity bills, but also allow for a cutback on installment fees, maintenance fees and repair fees involving power suppliers and heat-emitting equipment." (Whether those savings can offset the presumably formidable price tag, the Korean firm doesn’t say.)

Comments closed
    • DrDillyBar
    • 10 years ago

    Soon, my entire PC will exist in RAM. Good times.

      • MadManOriginal
      • 10 years ago

      Yeah except for that darn volatility thing ๐Ÿ™ Flash will eventually take over from mechanical drives but RAM as we have it now simply can’t without major and potentially unreliable kludges like battery backups. Maybe a smart system that uses a cominbation of RAM+mechanical/flash drives…it would have to be software-level and preferably low level or open standard, could be tricky to get an agreement worked out.

      Or there’s memristors, but they are much futher off.

    • blubje
    • 10 years ago

    I hope these products don’t stay esoteric and become available on [e.g.] newegg. 64gb of ram would be massively awesome for a server or scientific computing / programming.

      • lycium
      • 10 years ago

      192gb, with 6 32gb sticks! that would indeed be awesome, i’d go crazy with the procedural geometry…

    • Rakhmaninov3
    • 10 years ago

    Haven’t PCB’s been green for decades?

    ๐Ÿ™‚

    • Ashbringer
    • 10 years ago

    Today, everything is Green. Tomorrow, everything is going to be Red to match some sports car. Next year, everyone is going to be rainbow color to support gays. Yet, not a bit of it has anything to do with any of the changes with the product.

    Never a finer bunch of sheep I’ve ever seen before.

      • Meadows
      • 10 years ago

      g{

        • FireGryphon
        • 10 years ago

        I think a Rainbow Bright theme would be fun, too.

          • Meadows
          • 10 years ago

          You mean Rainbow Brite.

      • OneArmedScissor
      • 10 years ago

      l[<"Next year, everyone<]l r[

        • Meadows
        • 10 years ago

        Explanation.
        Your comment requires it.

        • moose17145
        • 10 years ago

        LOL

    • TheTechReporter
    • 10 years ago

    The problem is that consumer motherboards tend to only support up to 4GB DIMMs. Also, registered memory with ECC is basically a requirement at 32GB per stick, if you don’t want to run into problems.
    But, soon enough, desktop boards will probably become more like server boards and we’ll see higher and higher capacity modules.

      • pluscard
      • 10 years ago

      Will the registered ECC dimms work in desktop motherboards – like those based on the 790GX?

      Also – in your AM3 review – the Jetway only supported 8gb ram, while the other 3 supported 16g (using 4gb dimms of course).

      Is this a typo, or did Jetway just not enable support for the bigger dimms?

        • Farting Bob
        • 10 years ago

        Not unless your board specifically supportsd registered DIMMS of that size. I doubt any consumer board does. Hell i expect most low to mid server boards wont right now.

    • ludi
    • 10 years ago

    Good, because I’ve always wanted eco-sensitive RAM modules. I /[

      • danazar
      • 10 years ago

      I lol’d at this.

    • cygnus1
    • 10 years ago

    I’ll bet one of these costs as much as a decent used car.

    • vince
    • 10 years ago

    Soon we’ll be able to have fully-green PC’s (maybe we can already?), and of course, the case will have to have a forest-green finish with tree leave decals… >.<

      • ImSpartacus
      • 10 years ago

      Tree leaf decals? Motherfucker, I’m gonna have a tree growing inside my case.

        • dmitriylm
        • 10 years ago

        lol, what the feck happened to the word filter.

          • Meadows
          • 10 years ago

          Nothing, that’s a forum doohickey.

            • indeego
            • 10 years ago

            Front pagers just get banhammer. I like the risk factorg{<.<}g

    • ew
    • 10 years ago

    They look silver to me. With just a small green trim. If you want some real green memory then this would be much better. ยง[< http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820220344<]ยง

      • SomeOtherGeek
      • 10 years ago

      Made in Ireland??

    • crabjokeman
    • 10 years ago

    I just bought one of these. I think there’s a typo in my OS; it tells me I only have 3.2GB…

    • derFunkenstein
    • 10 years ago

    I think they’re getting carried away here. Isn’t RAM already one of the lightest energy usage components in a computer as it is?

      • Meadows
      • 10 years ago

      Don’t know, how do they compare to storage drives (especially SSDs)?

      • vikramsbox
      • 10 years ago

      Well not quite. If I remember right, RAM chips stay fairly cool under low memory throughput, but under load, a 2GB chip can take upto 4-6W. They put heatshields on performance RAMs for the same reason. So a 32GB RAM chip should put out quite a lot even in low load conditions, say as much as a normal HDD.

        • SomeOtherGeek
        • 10 years ago

        But then there is the other view… You don’t have to load all the slots either. You can do 4 instead of 8 and save on energy, right?

          • vikramsbox
          • 10 years ago

          Yeah, don’t have to load all the slots. But here we’re talking about 32GB per slot! That’s quite a lot.

      • danazar
      • 10 years ago

      Well, that disaster that was FB-DIMM showed it was possible to make RAM so power-hungry it impacted the power and heat characteristics of the entire machine. But normally, no, RAM is not assumed to make a significant difference.

      • OneArmedScissor
      • 10 years ago

      It’s not the lightest anymore when you have hundreds upon hundreds of them in your server farm.

      But it still matters with laptops, too. There’s about to be 1.2v DDR3. You can bet that will increase battery life some compared to 1.5v.

        • indeego
        • 10 years ago

        Reducing display power draw would be the most beneficialg{<.<}g

          • OneArmedScissor
          • 10 years ago

          I don’t believe that people working on making better RAM care about that too much. :p

          But yes, if you’re referring to what I said about laptops, about half the power of any recent one I’ve tested was just the LCD screen. They seem pretty efficient already, but every watt counts, and that’s probably the easiest place to keep knocking another one off.

          Regardless, lots of new laptops still use DDR2 or less than ideal DDR3. If 1.2v can be standardized for small modules, as the replacement for the current standard, it will make a difference, as that will be a transition from about 1.8v for most.

    • flip-mode
    • 10 years ago

    I can’t wait till LGA 1156 lands and gets some penetration so we start getting some proper DDR3 kit choices. Right now the biggest dual-channel DDR3 kit on sale at newegg is still 2 x 2GB. Lame. Edit: kinda similar to what pluscard said.

    • Farting Bob
    • 10 years ago

    How much does normal 1.5v DDR3 require to run? Seriously, the green marketing on HDD’s was stretching it a bit (although the effort there is justified by lower temps and quieter operation), but Unless your a crazy overclocker RAM temps arent an issue at standard voltages, and are silent already. You might save yourself 50 cents a year by using these “green” modules!

      • dmitriylm
      • 10 years ago

      If this is put into a server or server farm then the lower eletrical usage/temperature along with reduced cooling requirements could possibly make some kind of difference.

        • OneArmedScissor
        • 10 years ago

        It’s interesting because it’s both a 32GB module, far and away the largest, AND it runs lower than standard voltage.

        It wasn’t long ago that mere 2GB sticks of DDR2 were running 2.0v instead of 1.8v, at standard speeds.

        And I think the “green” hard drives thing was mostly for server farms, as well. They just happen to be able to use it as a selling point to the average consumer, on top of that. They blow it out of proportion sometimes, but really, I’m not going to make a big deal about them advertising that they’ll save you more power than anyone else’s similar drive, because that’s still some saved power. Replace a million drives with more efficient ones, and it adds up quick.

          • MadManOriginal
          • 10 years ago

          We need to replace 1.21 jiggadrives with drives that use 1 less watt each. Then the power that’s not being used for drives can be used for time travel!

            • SomeOtherGeek
            • 10 years ago

            Time traveling takes zero energy cuz we are taking it from the other time!

    • dustyjamessutton
    • 10 years ago

    I was expecting these things to be biodegradable or something. 10% energy savings, bah!

      • vikramsbox
      • 10 years ago

      Biodegradable RAM? Wouldn’t want that. They’ll cook up in the cabinet next to a GPU. Steak RAM? LOL

        • WillBach
        • 10 years ago

        Thanks a lot, Vikram. Now I’ll be hungry all day…

          • bthylafh
          • 10 years ago

          Mmm, I’m having deer steak tomorrow.

        • SonicSilicon
        • 10 years ago

        They’ll be RAM sticks, a gluten-free alternative to pretzel sticks.

          • willyolio
          • 10 years ago

          or how about RAM /[

            • w00tstock
            • 10 years ago

            Any way you slice it it spells delicious!

    • pluscard
    • 10 years ago

    I haven’t yet seen 4gb ddrs3 dimms – at least not from mainstream vendors like newegg.

    • Meadows
    • 10 years ago

    Because running /[

      • khands
      • 10 years ago

      Well it /[

        • Meadows
        • 10 years ago

        I do know that as far as heavy work is concerned, 8 GiB of RAM doesn’t cut the mustard for Photoshop CS4 64.

          • CasbahBoy
          • 10 years ago

          Yep. And in the case of virtualization in the datacenter, the sky is pretty much the limit. Memory densities like these are extremely welcome there.

      • FireGryphon
      • 10 years ago

      You have to run Photoshop in each of your six OSes running on virtual machines…

    • axeman
    • 10 years ago

    If this is registered, does that mean you can’t use it in any old system? Quite frankly I’m surprised it’s taken this long to get really high-capacity modules out the door, with 64 bit OSes being the norm now.

      • WillBach
      • 10 years ago

      That’s right. Registered memory (sometimes called buffered memory) works a little differently, making it a little slower than standard memory, but in a way that lets you have more sticks of memory per channel. High-capacity modules are a bit of a niche item, partly because many of the systems that use hundreds of GBs of memory use special module types like registered RAM and have ECC requirements, or use something completely different and proprietary.

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