Acer, Asus, HP working with Google on Chrome OS

When Google announced Chrome OS yesterday, the company said it was working with "multiple OEMs" to release netbooks based on the operating system. However, it neglected to mention any names. Well, a short list of frequently asked questions on the official Google Chrome blog now sheds light on that subject:

What companies is Google working with to support Google Chrome OS?
The Google Chrome OS team is currently working with a number of technology companies to design and build devices that deliver an extraordinary end user experience. Among others, these companies include: Acer, Adobe, ASUS, Freescale, Hewlett-Packard, Lenovo, Qualcomm, Texas Instruments.

Last time we checked, Acer was the number one netbook manufacturer, followed at a distance by Asus in second place and HP in third. Google is therefore working with the top players in the market: companies that, put together, accounted for 61% of all netbook shipments worldwide in the first quarter of this year.

Collaboration might not guarantee all of these vendors will rush Chrome OS-based systems out the door, of course. But it’s definitely a big deal.

Comments closed
    • bwoodring
    • 13 years ago

    Your point is dumb. Developers need to be able to depend on a core set of functionality to be available to the user. Would it make sense for Windows users not to be able to edit text files, view web pages, or unzip out of the box? It would not. As a point of reference, no other major OS is without these functions out of the box as well. I bet Chrome OS will have them too.

    Windows 7 is removing Email and Movie maker. What other functions do you think are bloat? Very little of this runs at startup anyway, who cares about the disk space.

    • Saber Cherry
    • 13 years ago

    My experience with WoW tells me that an OS needing a constant internet connection will go down for service at least twice a week, and they’ll keep nerfing all the apps I regularly use.

    • indeego
    • 13 years ago

    Server Coreg{<.<}g

    • Skrying
    • 13 years ago

    Internet devices? What the hell is an internet device? You have smartphones (Google has an OS for those, Android), you have MIDs (which Android would be much better for), you have smartbooks (which is basically a netbook with smartphone innerds) which Chrome OS would be for and then you have netbooks which would also be Chrome OS.

    A internet device would be anything from your most basic cell phone these days to the most powerful desktop. I’m fairly certain that Chrome OS is therefore aimed at smartbooks and netbooks… which are the same form factor and near certainly the same thing to everyone but the worst of marketing people and nerds.

    • Chrispy_
    • 13 years ago

    So how long until we have the Microsoft answer to Google OS

    You know, an OS rather than a bloated collage of all-in-one product suite, huge tracts of which are useless and waste resources.

    All an OS needs to do is support applications. Granted, notepad is f*cking awesome, but it’s NOT part of the OS, it is yet another application that runs on the OS.

    • SPOOFE
    • 13 years ago

    Semantics. We’d call them “Turtlenecks” if the first successful such device had that moniker.

    • Voldenuit
    • 13 years ago

    Google docs has an offline mode. I imagine most ChromeOS-targeted apps will have similar functions.

    On the converse side, uptake of chromeOS could spur more manufacturers to support WWAN technologies, and increased customer base and competition could lower the cost of entry for users. This would be a good thing, and has been too long in the making.

    • Xenolith
    • 13 years ago

    How are we getting netbooks out of “devices”. These will be internet devices, not netbooks.

    • indeego
    • 13 years ago

    Yeah I think for the first time in a while people actually have a reasonable choice when it comes to providers.

    Without Google we wouldn’t have Exchange Hosted online and many other services Microsoft now must compete in. (We’re talking price reductions of 40% versus 5 years ago now to get a decent Exchange server up and runningg{.}g)

    • crose
    • 13 years ago

    This is a good start by Google. They are slowly nibbling away at Microsofts cake. And even if they don’t succeed they will keep MS awake at night working harder.

    • stmok
    • 13 years ago

    Can you say open source?

    The OS is going to be open source. Just wait until they offer the entire source code, and rip out all the “user tracking” or “dial home to Google” bits.

    People already do this with Google’s Chrome browser. They download the source code from the Chromium project, rip out the crap, and compile their own! Ta-da! => Google Chrome without Big Brother!

    • dustyjamessutton
    • 13 years ago

    I’m not comfortable with everything being done online. It just screams “Big brother is watching you”. Can you say, THX, The Island, or Fahrenheit 451?

    • ew
    • 13 years ago

    I’m guessing those three companies will be pretty happy to not pay royalties for good software to put on their products.

    • bdwilcox
    • 13 years ago

    Hmm, wonder who’s missing from that list of OEMs? Gee, I don’t know, maybe a company that sounds like “Dull”?

    • vikramsbox
    • 13 years ago

    An offline capability would be nice. But considering the notes by reviewers in Anandtech and other sites, this may or may not be the case. In any case, its not the same as a true offline capability. What strikes me as most alarming is the google following the cloud methodology too rigidly.
    In any case, if the offline capability manages to store anywhere near the 30-40GB average users easily pack up in their netbooks by way of software and files, there’s no use for uploading in the cloud. Too much of internet bandwidth and usage charges would be consumed.
    Too far into the internet hype, I’d say. I won’t be putting the clothes I want to wear tomorrow morning on another flat a 100 miles away!

    • indeego
    • 13 years ago

    Google Gearsg{<.<}g

    • Corrado
    • 13 years ago

    Perhaps the machine will have a ‘Google Apps Lite’ daemon on it that will allow you to do everything via Apache, and sync up as soon as you are online.

    Edit:
    D’oh! Was supposed to be a reply to #1!

    • stmok
    • 13 years ago

    Yes, its called an “Offline” capability.

    • Tamale
    • 13 years ago

    I had the same concern at first too, but I’m sure google is aware that a netbook isn’t truly online all the time, and there will be provisions for getting your work done while unplugged..

    I’m guessing heavy use of chrome’s abilities to make ‘desktop application’ shortcuts will be there, in addition to mini server APIs that allow google’s most common webapps to work perfectly fine while off line.

    like, the ability to save your gmail locally so you can search and browsse it offline, or the ability to use google docs with local files directly… stuff like that.

    it will definitely be interesting to see.

    • vikramsbox
    • 13 years ago

    Most of the comments on the Chrome OS has been on the cost factor. But I’m more worried about the cloud computing factor. An OS that works only online is not attractive to say the least.
    At least it has my thumbs down. I prefer a self contained OS to going online everytime.

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