It’s official: Windows 7 has gone gold

The rumor mill was off, but not by much. According to Brandon LeBlanc from the official Windows Blog, Microsoft released Windows 7 to manufacturing earlier today.

Here’s how LeBlanc describes the release-to-manufacturing (RTM) process:

What happens is a build gets designated as a RTM contender after going through significant testing and meeting our quality bar for RTM. Then, it goes though all the validation checks required for RTM including having all languages of that build completed. If all the validation checks have passed – sign-off for RTM can occur. Today after all the validation checks were met, we signed off and declared build 7600 as RTM.

LeBlanc adds that Microsoft will deliver the completed operating system to its partners "within the next few days," so they can prepare for the retail release on October 22. The blogger also takes a moment to thank folks who grabbed the Windows 7 beta and RC and contributed bug reports. More than 10 million people opted in to the Customer Experience Improvement Program, he says.

Windows Server 2008 R2, the server-bound variant of Windows 7, has also hit RTM status. A post on the Windows Server Division blog notes that the milestone occurred "in lock-step" with the Windows 7 RTM.

Comments closed
    • swaaye
    • 13 years ago

    I ask myself that question daily. Maybe not for 9x, but definitely for NT5 vs. NT6.

    Back in the 9x days, stability was shockingly bad and there really were very good reasons to go to NT5. NT4 to NT5 is similarly a worthy upgrade. I’m kinda fuzzy on why NT6 is world-changing and improved enough to cause flame wars.

    9x is actually not as awful as it seems when you remember that it needs only a fraction as much RAM as NT5 to be usable. I can put together an old machine on 9x that is still functional today….

    • Valhalla926
    • 13 years ago

    Have we been given a way to disable auto-arrange in windows explorer? I know it sounds petty, but I want to sort my folders the way I see fit, not just alphabetically or by date accessed.

    • indeego
    • 13 years ago

    No I don’t do betatesting unless I’m paid to do sog{<. <}g

    • Grigory
    • 13 years ago

    That’s what I was wondering, too. Why would anybody put a guy like this in charge of the IT?

    • UberGerbil
    • 13 years ago

    I just thought of it. I am amused by “Applementalist” as a term (though strictly speaking it would seem to better apply to the mentality of the Linux diehards; the Apple fanatics seem to fall more into the /[

    • Flying Fox
    • 13 years ago

    Again I have to ask, did you report it?

    • Flying Fox
    • 13 years ago

    q[

    • Flying Fox
    • 13 years ago

    Erm, that’s usually how businesses work, skipping a release or 2 for better tested applications, not-as-frequent retraining costs, and to coincide with the 4-ish year hardware upgrade cycle.

    • Flying Fox
    • 13 years ago

    Any nice links that summarize all that?

    • Bauxite
    • 13 years ago

    Nice freudian slip :p

    • SGT Lindy
    • 13 years ago

    Windows 7 is Vista SP2 with very minor GUI changes. Its essentially Vista fixed or the way it should have shipped. The name change is to get rid of the name and all of the negative that goes with it.

    This is a typical MS cycle. I have been supporting MS products for 20 years.

    NT 3.1 totally sucked. 3.5 was better, and NT 4.0 very good ( at its time). NT 4.0 was NT done right. Windows 2000 was the change to Active Directory, it was OK, but Windows 2003 was 2000 finished. Same for XP over 2000 professional.

    Exchange 5.5 great product. Exchange 2000 not so great as it went into AD. Exchange 2003 rock solid. Exchange 2007 bloated pig with so many bugs that Exchange 2007 SP1 actually reinstalled the entire product and not just updated it. We are now on Exchange 2007 SP1 update 9 and its finally just OK. Exchange 2010 will be 2007 finished.

    Vista sucked donky balls. Windows 7 is Vista fixed.

    My company skipped most of Windows 2000 and Exchange 2000 totally. We finally went to AD with 2003 and Exchange 2003. We have skipped over Vista, and Office 2007, Office 2007 was such a slow pig when it came out. We will in 2010, deploy 2008 R2 server and Exchange 2010/Office 2010 but probably on Windows XP to start off with.

    • Sniper
    • 13 years ago

    This is where the older generation scratches their head and says, “Is Windows 98 better than Windows 7?”

    • UberGerbil
    • 13 years ago

    Aka the Osborne Effect.

    And the hype from MS hasn’t even started yet (ie, the ad campaign). Pretty much all the hype for Win7 so far has been coming from enthusiasts and users. It’s not even the press or the MS blogs for the most part. Just look around here, for instance. It’s hardly Applementalist monomania, but it is pretty organic.

    The official MS hype undoubtedly will be far less heartfelt and (if their entire history of advertising is anything to go by) rather lame.

    • dolemitecomputers
    • 13 years ago

    All 5 of them?

    • Kurotetsu
    • 13 years ago

    It looks like the Ultimate Steal is still going:

    §[<http://www.microsoft.com/student/discounts/theultimatesteal-us/default.aspx<]§ Office 2007 Ultimate for $60 is about as close to free as you're going to get (for an MS Office suite I mean).

    • axeman
    • 13 years ago

    At work I’m getting several BSOD in csc.sys which is a Windows driver for “Client Side Caching”. Hopefully RTM will fix it, because otherwise Win7 is a great improvement.

    • UberGerbil
    • 13 years ago

    All those except the first sound like driver (probably chipset driver) issues.

    Did you report the first one?

    I haven’t tried this with Vista/7, but I used to have a shortcut on XP to unlock the desktop that used a command line something like
    %windir%\System32\tscon.exe 0 /dest:console

    • kvndoom
    • 13 years ago

    Chop Chop sad Panda!

    (you’ll get it even if no one else does) 😉

    • PetMiceRnice
    • 13 years ago

    I can see where you’re coming from, but an OS upgrade is necessary sooner or later. If this were not the case, we’d still all be running Windows 3.1 or 95. In my case, I skipped Vista, so Windows 7 is certainly something I should look at.

    • swaaye
    • 13 years ago

    It would be stupid of them to start hyping their next product already because it will only diminish 7’s hype.

    • ray0203
    • 13 years ago

    I honestly dig what you mean. It’s always been that way ever since windows 98 went out. I mean come on, they wasted people’s money on vista, now they’re hyping this new version like its the best out there… you got to be kidding me.

    I won’t be surprised to hear a press release saying a new OS is in the works already.

    • mcnabney
    • 13 years ago

    If you already have Vista, it is gouge-ware.

    • thecoldanddarkone
    • 13 years ago

    You just called onenote useless. HOW DARE YOU!! jk, I used onenote until I finished college this year. It’s a simple program that can sync everything I do with the things I needed, it also provided a better notetaking experience than any other program I’ve used. While working at a small college as a sys admin I got a good many teachers stuck on it.

    • Grigory
    • 13 years ago

    Haha, that was pretty clever! 😀

    • indeego
    • 13 years ago

    Vista Pro and above will have many, many years of support, per Microsoft obligations to enterprise/license customersg{<.<}g

    • blubje
    • 13 years ago

    xbox 1 is a forgotten product? maybe for microsoft, probably not by the hacking community.

    • moriz
    • 13 years ago

    same here. ottawaU does not offer office; only useless things like onenote. this makes me sadpanda 🙁

    • rohith10
    • 13 years ago

    More like Microsoft Sam.

    • Kurotetsu
    • 13 years ago

    No, can’t say it did.

    • indeego
    • 13 years ago

    Current bugs in 7 on my desktop:
    If I RDP to the desktop, then kill the connection, I cannot get access to the machine locally again until I RDP back into it, log off/reboot. It gets stuck in a C+A+D loop. This would be a “show stopper” if rolled out live in our environment.

    – One USB port doesn’t work correctly under 7. Worked fine under Vista/32.

    – Doesn’t enter sleep. Performance tools claim it’s “User Mode Driver Framework Reflector.” holding it back

    And Laptop:
    -Crashes with a BSOD that Windows 7 is unable to determine what caused it. I haven’t bothered with debugging, but the laptop worked fine under Vista.

    – Prompt to remove ethernet port and DVD drive occasionally.

    Hopefully all addressed after the RCg{<.<}g

    • equivicus
    • 13 years ago

    I suppose he was confused by the whole, “Try Windows 7 free” campaign. Not realizing it would timeout and that it wasn’t the final release.

    • turrican
    • 13 years ago

    The latest Windows version is always hyped and is a status symbol, but it’s still a _commercial_ product. I posted because I’m annoyed to see the “buy Windows or you’re not cool” trend again while I look at the machines and I see $5k worth of OS upgrades + labour + extras…

    • sativa
    • 13 years ago

    Actually the removal of some RDP features is a big change.

    • Farting Bob
    • 13 years ago

    So im guessing your some kind of system admin in a medium sized business running windows PCs and you dont know a single thing about MS’s latest OS?

    • smilingcrow
    • 13 years ago

    🙂 (more characters to make it to 10)

    • PetMiceRnice
    • 13 years ago

    I’m still running Windows XP too, and totally skipped Vista (quite successfully), but I will be buying a new laptop with Windows 7 perhaps as early as the end of the year.

    • Ikeoth
    • 13 years ago

    Ha, nice FFVII reference, but naw really though…Win 7 with Build #7777 may have had better reception than Microsoft’s Marketing gurus realize and they could be missing a big wave of consumer enthusiasm and free coverage…

    • Flying Fox
    • 13 years ago

    They most likely use keyword scans to find out common requests and crash reports. The developers may not read every individual request, but looks like they do listen to the feedback. A lot of the RC changes are from the testing public, if their claims are to be believed of course.

    • SomeOtherGeek
    • 13 years ago

    Probably a good thing. You might have wasted your time otherwise… I can’t image MS spending the money to listen to everyone’s feedback.

    • SomeOtherGeek
    • 13 years ago

    It is free, you just have to find the means, I guess.

    • kvndoom
    • 13 years ago

    See this is why every Vista/ Windows 7 post on TR turns into a flame fest. If someone is happy with their software, it does not make them less intelligent or an inferior human being.

    I could ask you, did you ditch your wife after 5 or 6 years for a newer model? Put your kids out on the street when they turned 10? Burned down your house after paying for it for a decade?

    I mean, come on! UGH!

    • Meadows
    • 13 years ago

    You cannot possibly be serious with that question.

    • kvndoom
    • 13 years ago

    I can get it free through school, but what I really want is a free copy of Office 2003 or newer. Don’t really need another OS.

    • Tamale
    • 13 years ago

    yes, and that’s exactly his point. win 2k was a great OS too, but XP was the popular one 😉

    • totoro
    • 13 years ago

    Yes but those tweaks you mentioned aren’t being given away for free in a service pack. ; )

    Also, if you want to get technical about it, isn’t the conventional wisdom that XP is just a ‘highly tweaked’ version of Windows 2000?

    • Trymor
    • 13 years ago

    Baa, baa, baa

    • eitje
    • 13 years ago

    yeah it is.

    • derFunkenstein
    • 13 years ago

    even if he didn’t, I did.:)

    • Flying Fox
    • 13 years ago

    Oh noes! I procrastinated so much and haven’t sent my feedback! 😯

    • Flying Fox
    • 13 years ago

    Remember most people will be coming from XP or before, so to them it is a big change.

    • Flying Fox
    • 13 years ago

    Well then did you send that feedback?

    • Flying Fox
    • 13 years ago

    You’ll find out soon enough. 😉

    • Flying Fox
    • 13 years ago

    Well then, did you have to pay for those XP and Vista licenses?

    • Da_Boss
    • 13 years ago

    I still don’t think you quite got it.

    If anything, I think the positive reviews of windows 7 suggest that things like the Mojave Experiment were, in fact, right. It all demonstrates that Vista IS a strong OS, or at the very least, a solid foundation on which a strong OS was built. Windows 7 is nothing more than a highly tweaked version of an already solid OS. Anyone who has actually lived with both OSs for any measure of time (recently) can attest to that.

    The only reason Microsoft is doing this is to separate themselves from the stigma of Vista, which is bad enough to hurt MS, regardless of how well Vista has actually progressed and matured.

    • crose
    • 13 years ago

    Ha ha ha, Windows VIsta was just a gigantic Windows 7 Alpha-test

    • Bauxite
    • 13 years ago

    Yeah sorry, I don’t mean whatever convoluted naming scheme that doesn’t match reality (aka Windows 2000 service pack 4YEARS) but the actual builds and patches when they do a real overhaul.

    Its ok if you need to justify your time and anything else you already blew for vista though.

    • MadManOriginal
    • 13 years ago

    If Win 7 is Vista SP3 that means current Vista users will be just as well off as Win 7 users. d’oh, flawed Vista hate

    • derFunkenstein
    • 13 years ago

    Yeah, I believe that’s a first. ME had some sort of pseudo orchestral sound like XP, only a different set of notes. Come to think of it, I think ME and Win2k shared a startup sound, but they were both released around the same time.

    • Meadows
    • 13 years ago

    It’s not as black-and-white as you’re trying to make it seem.

    • derFunkenstein
    • 13 years ago

    Nothing new. This is what they wanted to do with XP and it’s what they had done with pretty much every other OS they ever released.

    • turrican
    • 13 years ago

    It has nothing to do with Linux, I have 40+ XP and a few Vista machines to take care of.

    • mac_h8r1
    • 13 years ago

    The most interesting thing I’ve seen so far is that the startup sound has not changed from Vista. Unless I’m mistaken, that’s a first for MS (maybe 98 to ME but I thought ME had something different).

    • FuturePastNow
    • 13 years ago

    The real question is, will the retail version include the wacky desktop backgrounds from the RC?

    • -_-
    • 13 years ago

    Will it still Install upgrade version over itself?

    • -_-
    • 13 years ago

    Ha yeah sleepyhead is good.

    • ssidbroadcast
    • 13 years ago

    How do I pronounce your name? Sleepyhead?

    • rythex
    • 13 years ago

    ho ho ho, <insert witty comment about linux> ho ho ho!

    • turrican
    • 13 years ago

    Is Windows 7 free or payware?

    • Kurotetsu
    • 13 years ago

    Well, if he compared XP (13-inch B&W CRT) to 7 (HDTV) and felt that XP was good enough for him, more power to him. He shouldn’t be bashed for it.

    • -_-
    • 13 years ago

    Broadcasting beautiful views 24 hours a day: you’re tuned to the Scenery Channel.

    • relish
    • 13 years ago

    Looks like we have to wait until August 6th! 🙁

    • Krogoth
    • 13 years ago

    RTFM has some additional bugfixes and maybe a few UI tweaks. Otherwise, RC1 is not that much different.

    • ssidbroadcast
    • 13 years ago

    Nuclear launch detected.

    • Corrado
    • 13 years ago

    I bet you still own the first car you ever bought too. Why get an HDTV? The content is still the same on a 13″ B&W CRT right?

    • Bauxite
    • 13 years ago

    Smart people are upgrading from xp anyways (if at all) and skipped the vista tax altogether 😉

    (I don’t really count the “dual” vista/xp license thats been going on for awhile with OEMs)

    7 is basically Vista SP3 despite whatever marketing BS they spout this time, so its finally usable.

    Classic Microsoft, it always seems to be a few service packs before you really deploy it. You would think people already learned this from NT, 9x, 2000 and XP…

    *shrug*

    • jonbanh
    • 13 years ago

    DOUCHEFAG

    • Jon
    • 13 years ago

    It’s how business works. It’s the strategic placement of news that reels in the investors and shareholders. It also goes by another name, pack logic.

    • totoro
    • 13 years ago

    One is free : )

    • sativa
    • 13 years ago

    What are the differences between the RTM and RC versions? I could only find info about some changes in remote desktop.

    • burntham77
    • 13 years ago

    Fine. More 7 for the rest of us.

    • tygrus
    • 13 years ago

    If you live in the city and don’t like the Vista, painting over your Windows doesn’t help.

    • FubbHead
    • 13 years ago

    I dunno, shouldn’t be that much more work. But avoiding nightmares have never been high on Microsoft’s priority list. For one, they still have different licenses for different languages, except for Ultimate (IIRC, and in any case, it has MUI support). Which is just an idiotic policy.

    But it isn’t so much that there’s the same upgrade price for both of them, than all these ways of upgrading, discounts depending if it’s OEM, if it’s purchased after a certain date, etc, etc. Then add the fact that most manufacturers (if any) won’t give you the option to opt out of it and save the cash. Now *that* would be a much more valid antitrust case than shipping with friggin’ Explorer or not.

    And they can get away with imposing all these articifical limits on their customers in every way they can, because of their monopoly position. But I’ve had it.

    • totoro
    • 13 years ago

    Yes but then the OS would flash and start attacking, doing 7777 damage each time. And then where would we be, hmm?

    • UberGerbil
    • 13 years ago

    Separate prices for upgrades from different past OSes would be a nightmare (how would the retailer verify it?) What MS could’ve done, I suppose, is offer some kind of a mail-in rebate for registered and authenticated Vista users. That gets a little tricky with international customers, but it could be done.

    But there are improvements from Vista, and most customers will be coming from XP anyway.

    • XaiaX
    • 13 years ago

    Obviously, you could, or you wouldn’t have bothered to tell us.

    • FubbHead
    • 13 years ago

    And yet, they charge you for a full upgrade. And even worse, it’s the same for people coming from XP, as for those coming from Vista.

    • [SDG]Mantis
    • 13 years ago

    Of course it is just a marketing ploy. Everyone who is tech savvy really knows that this is Vista R2 or SE, depending on which suffix you prefer.

    • [SDG]Mantis
    • 13 years ago

    I can’t help but wonder if they’re not going to try to go to a Mac OS X-style 1.5-2 year refresh model. Of course, that would basically mean paying for service packs.

    • Ashbringer
    • 13 years ago

    Vista has such a bad name that Microsoft is trying to avoid any ideas that they maybe similar. It’s just a marketing strategy that isn’t new with Microsoft.

    Remember Win 98 –> Win 98 SE? How about Windows 2000 –> Windows XP?

    • SomeOtherGeek
    • 13 years ago

    About 177. But knowing MS and taking out the bugs – it will be 77.

    Did that help?

    • radix
    • 13 years ago

    And here I am, still using Windows XP. Couldn’t care less about Win7, at least this point in time.

    • Pettytheft
    • 13 years ago

    Once this Beta is up I’ll be going back to Vista. I just don’t see enough difference between the two plus Win7 still can’t manage to get my computer to go into sleep mode.

    • Kurotetsu
    • 13 years ago

    Agreed.

    +2

    • Kurotetsu
    • 13 years ago

    I haven’t kept up with the beta or RC builds at all. What’re the differences between build 7600 and 7777?

    • DrDillyBar
    • 13 years ago

    woo woo

    • cygnus1
    • 13 years ago

    Agreed, technet plus will be purchased come Aug. 14th (payday). I need to update several pc’s and VMs (including some 2k8 systems as well).

    • UberGerbil
    • 13 years ago

    Historically for client OSes it’s more like 3 years (Win 3.1 to 95, 95 to 98, 98 to XP) — that “new game” has been going on for twenty years now. And that synchs up reasonably well to the typical 4 year depreciation cycle for businesses (including a year for evaluation / deployment planning). But businesses haven’t seen the need to replace desktops with the frequency they did in the past, and consumers aren’t either (and iPhone apps seem to be the new hotness anyway). And you’re always at least spec’ing the next version as you’re developing the current one; if nothing else, if gives you a place to put the features you inevitably have to cut.

    The XP to Vista gap was a major failure for MS, but it also happened to coincide with a time when hardware had finally caught up to software. There just isn’t any killer app that forces people to upgrade their entire machine, and there hasn’t been for some time now. Win7 may be a big success, but that may be a problem for MS in exactly the same way XP was.

    • BenBasson
    • 13 years ago

    “I’m thinking this is their new game.”

    It’s about as new as capitalism, and if they don’t release something new in a few years, they’d be doing it wrong.

    • Vasilyfav
    • 13 years ago

    So is 7600.16385 the RTM build or something else?

    • Meadows
    • 13 years ago

    I shot for that number back when build 7000 was all the rage. Would’ve been cool.

    • Meadows
    • 13 years ago

    Controlling the UI with your mind, only DirectX 12.1 can do that so you won’t be able to use Windows 7.

    • swaaye
    • 13 years ago

    So what’s MS going to release in ~2.5 years that obsoletes 7? I’m thinking this is their new game. They must have a team working in parallel on the next new hotness.

    • green
    • 13 years ago

    personally i was hoping final build would be 7777…

    • 5150
    • 13 years ago

    I guess I get a birthday present a day late.

    • 5150
    • 13 years ago

    Nice post. +1

    • no51
    • 13 years ago

    Any noticeable differences from RC1 to RTM?

    • UberGerbil
    • 13 years ago

    g[

    • UberGerbil
    • 13 years ago

    Signing off a major product to RTM is a weird experience — a mix of relief (“it’s over!”) anticipation (“how will the customers respond?”) and trepidation (“What if we missed something? What if that severity 1 non-reproducible bug turns out to be very reproducible?”) And a bit anti-climactic, since the sign-off is just a public formality to acknowledge a process that has already been handled through your tracking / management software. (Though for some companies like MS that have been around a while, there was a time when the “golden master” was a real disk that was literally hand-carried to the manufacturing facilities).

    • Austin
    • 13 years ago

    l[<:o)<]l ... and on Technet from 6th August too from what I hear. That will be a very popular download. Apparently Microsoft servers have already crashed due to massive demand for Win7 pre-orders, more pre-orders were taken in the first 8 hours than all 17 weeks of Vista's pre-order period.

    • 5150
    • 13 years ago

    Bring on the TechNet, like, now!

    • ImSpartacus
    • 13 years ago

    Now I can just wait for it to hit the torrents.

    7600 was leaked, but it wasn’t the RTM. Maybe it’s up now?

    • UberGerbil
    • 13 years ago

    And tomorrow MS releases its quarterly and annual financial results, which they can temper with an upbeat “Win7 is going out the door!”

    Funny how that works.

    • eitje
    • 13 years ago

    RC still on MSDN! I can hardly wait…

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