Hitachi ships 2TB, 7,200-RPM hard drive

While Hitachi certainly isn’t the first company to introduce a 2TB hard drive, it may well be the first with a consumer drive that couples that capacity with a 7,200-RPM spindle speed. The new 2TB Deskstar 7K2000, which has both of those attributes, has now started shipping.

Hitachi says it makes the Deskstar 7K2000 using a five-platter design with a 32MB cache. That’s one more platter than WD’s 2TB Caviar Green, which also has a lower spindle speed. Unsurprisingly, then, the Deskstar 7K2000 seems to be quite a bit louder—at least, Hitachi quotes a "typical" noise level of 29 dB.

Hitachi has also announced a "refreshed" version of its "high-volume desktop hard drive family:" the Deskstar 7K1000.C series. These new drives come with capacities ranging from 160GB to 1TB, with up to 500GB per platter. Cache sizes vary from 8 to 32MB depending on the model, while noise level are a fainter 24-25 dB. The 7K1000.C family will hit production "in the current quarter," says Hitachi.

As far as we’re aware, WD was the first hard drive maker to announce a 2TB consumer drive (the 2TB Caviar Green) in January. Seagate followed in February with the 2TB, 7,200-RPM Constellation ES, an enterprise product, and it came out with the low-power, consumer-oriented 2TB Barracuda LP in April.

Comments closed
    • vikramsbox
    • 13 years ago

    Yes. This is what I was saying about the workarounds. These technologies have successfully managed to turn the spotlight away from brute force mechanical HDDs. The Blue is also a lower performance than the Black. Thanks for the info.
    One thing that I wholeheartedly agree with you is that all these decisions are basically borne out behind closed doors. What was known as Look Ahead Buffer is now intelli seek, blah blah. We’ll never know if the wine in the bottle is old or new.
    *[

    • MadManOriginal
    • 13 years ago

    Just because I can…according to WD’s site Caviar Blues have Intelliseek and what you call ‘intelli-park’ is, I believe, what WD calls ‘NoTouch ramp load technology’ and is shared across all current drives, it’s not a name specifically for the aggressive spin-down or parking that the Green series does. I guess that would fall under ‘intelli-power’ which is vaguely described as ‘A fine-tuned balance of spin speed, transfer rate and caching algorithms designed to deliver both significant power savings and solid performance.’

    • vikramsbox
    • 13 years ago

    There were 3 intelli-x “technologies: introduced by WD- intelli-seek, intelli-power, and intelli-park, all of which are used *[

    • just brew it!
    • 13 years ago

    The main reason to go with an “enterprise” or “RAID certified” drive is the tuning of the error recovery algorithms. For an enterprise environment where data is typically stored on RAID-5 arrays, you don’t want the drive to spend a long time retrying failed sectors since this will cause the entire RAID array to stall. Instead, you want to report the read error back to the RAID controller as quickly as possible so that it can reconstruct the data using the parity stripe.

    • just brew it!
    • 13 years ago

    You’re confusing Intelliseek with something else. Intelliseek refers to the ability to calculate when the required data will pass under the head (based on rotational latency), then move the heads just fast enough to get them there in time, instead of always moving the heads as fast as possible. This saves power and reduces noise.

    • just brew it!
    • 13 years ago

    IIRC commodity hard drives have used 5 platter designs off an on over the years. It isn’t exactly a new thing. Pretty sure Hitachi/IBM was one of the vendors that has done it before.

    • vikramsbox
    • 13 years ago

    As far as I’m aware, Hitachi current gen HDDs are equal to other HDD makers in no. of platters/HDD for sizes less than 1TB. Its only on 1TB or more that they contain ‘extra’ platters.
    Do you have any info otherwise. Its very difficult to identify WD/Hitachi and Samsung drives’ generations from their model numbers. Hitachi keeps selling many older gen HDDs because of the ‘demand’ it seems. This may be the reason why you see Hitachis with extra platters.

    • MadManOriginal
    • 13 years ago

    I’m confused by your post. I was talking about 5 b[

    • Krogoth
    • 13 years ago

    We just need some EFI-equipped motherboard now……………

    • vikramsbox
    • 13 years ago

    The reason why the others have (at least till now) not taken the route of less than 500GB platters may be the competition. WD had come on very strongly and Seagate needed to maintain its numero uno position.
    The only way that either could get on top was by having a top of the line HDD that was the largest and the best.
    Its then that WD saw that loading 2 or more platters on the same disk would reduce the reliability drastically, so it came out with the so called ‘intelli seek’ which would park out the head away from the platter after certain time of inactivity. To divert attention from the real reason, WD clerverly started riding the LP bandwagon and named the new lop spindle speed breed the ‘Green’ series. Thus it could claim to use 500GB platters without letting the disks fail like Seagate’s. Now Seagate (and Samsung) too is following suit. But Hitachi has gone the other way, maybe as they don’t make as many HDD’s as the others, its better for them to maintain the 7200rpm factor.
    As long as the disks are reliable and offer decent performance, it should be ok. WD’s “Green” move has successfully moved the consumer perception of the 1TB+ drives from being fast system drives to being storage drives.
    Reliability will always be an issue as WD’s Green series are guaranteed only upto 300,000 AHPC (which they reach in a few months), Seagate has all kinds of failures, and Hitachi has more platters than seems safe.

    • jstern
    • 13 years ago

    How many years would it take to fill up all that space with that particular type of film. And then have it all gone. How many years would it take to watch it all.

    • indeego
    • 13 years ago

    GPT is here for good nowg{<.<}g

    • vikramsbox
    • 13 years ago

    Hope the 5 platters don’t load the disk too much. Else, OMG! All ur pr0n gone!

    • MadManOriginal
    • 13 years ago

    Yes, that’s a logical deduction and seems the most likely explanation although we’ll never really know. I should have phrased my question differently to emphasize the ‘only’ part though – why don’t the other companies make 5 platter designs if the areal density issue is the barrier. It would have allowed higher capacities sooner.

    I don’t think the performance difference from density would be quite as great as your last sentence though – it’s mainly seek time that suffers from lower RPM. Hitachi’s previous 5-platter designs aren’t that far behind.

    • vikramsbox
    • 13 years ago

    I think that the reason for 5 platters is in the 7200 rpm spindle speed. During the early days of the 1TB and 1.5TB drives that used 500GB platters, the early reviews of WD suggested that one of the reasons why the WD’s spindle speed was reduced to 5400rpm to control the probability of head crashes and spin failures.
    Supposedly the 500GB/platter density is very near the mechanical limits of the 3.5″ factor, making the location of the head even more near the platter, increasing the risk of head crashes. Since there was a trade off between the 2 alternate configs of 500GB/platter @ 5400rpm (in 2 platters) vs 333GB/platter @ 7200rpm (but 3 platters), WD chose the former.
    It seems Hitachi chose to go the other way. In real world use, I’d expect that the performance would be more or less similar to the 5400+rpm drives (as the platter density is less).

    • MadManOriginal
    • 13 years ago

    d’oh, ok, I hadn’t even thought of that but that’s not what he was getting at. He was implying that 5 platter drives are thicker than others when they aren’t afaik. Thinner is fine but there’s an upper bound for the maximum size and 5 platter drives aren’t any larger than others.

    • Synchromesh
    • 13 years ago

    More faster reliable pr0n!

    • Nomgle
    • 13 years ago

    Yesterday.

    When did you last check out a few modern Hard Drives side-by-side ? 160GB single-platter drives are usually quite a lot slimmer than 500GB/1TB units !

    • Hattig
    • 13 years ago

    Hmm, only 10,000x the capacity of my first hard drive, and 31,250,000x the actual memory in my first computer.

    Not nearly enough!

    • 5150
    • 13 years ago

    Reliable pr0n?

    • jdaven
    • 13 years ago

    You could already do more pr0n. Now you can do faster pr0n.

    • continuum
    • 13 years ago

    The Seagate Constellation ES 2TB may have been announced, but it isn’t shipping yet and isn’t expected for a few more months if memory serves?

    I’m waiting for that, or an E7K2000 from Hitachi… =( Might put 2TB RE4-GP’s from WD into one demo build for a customer here and hope performance is adequate…

    • continuum
    • 13 years ago

    Yes. Firmware changes for RAID use and improved vibration tolerance are very real parts of the design.

    Changes may be quite minor, but they are very real. In large arrays, especially, this is extremely important for reliability and troubleshooting. Areca’s HDD compatibility listing for example, isn’t just for show…

    • SPOOFE
    • 13 years ago

    My guess is that it’s a heckuva lot more important and common to get support calls for Enterprise stuff than it is for consumer hardware.

    • MadManOriginal
    • 13 years ago

    Err…you’ve seen 3.5″ internal HDs that are different sizes? How long ago was that?

    • ironoutsider
    • 13 years ago

    Yeah, It’s gotta be pretty dang thick or something. 3 Platter drives always seemed ginormous to me. 5 must be crazy.

    • Vaughn
    • 13 years ago

    I’m pretty sure enterprise drives also use firmwares that are suited for their workloads and the drives themselves go through more testing. And they are built to handle more heat, cause the drive casings themselves tend to be thicker. You can even see an example of this in the consumer market if you compare a raptor to a standard 7200 rpm drive.

    • Chrispy_
    • 13 years ago

    Sounds like the same bureaucracy that seperates Quadro/FireGL cards from their Geforce/Radeon counterparts.

    Same hardware, different label, miniscule driver/firmware changes and enrmous price difference to cover god-only-knows-what….

    • Krogoth
    • 13 years ago

    More pr0n!

    • Meadows
    • 13 years ago

    That means it’s either really brilliant, or really stupid.

    • CasbahBoy
    • 13 years ago

    “Maybe.” Drive manufacturers are spreading a lot of what /[

    • MadManOriginal
    • 13 years ago

    I wonder why Hitachi is the only company that makes 5 platter drives.

    • Kurotetsu
    • 13 years ago

    Noise?

    • ltcommander.data
    • 13 years ago

    I’m guessing this Hitachi drive is what is being used in Apple’s new 2TB Time Capsule that was released last week seeing that previous Time Capsules have used Hitachi drives before. It certainly wouldn’t be the first time Apple pre-announced hardware such as Nehalem Xeons, quad core Clovertons, and the 9400M chipset.

    • Forge
    • 13 years ago

    My WHS machine, with it’s finite drive bays, demands 3TB disks. Anything less would be a poor upgrade from the current 1.5TB ones!

    • SomeOtherGeek
    • 13 years ago

    Money?

    • dermutti
    • 13 years ago

    AFAIK, price and warranty (which sorta implies better QA, but not necessarily).

    • FireGryphon
    • 13 years ago

    Is there a real distinction between a consumer hard drive and an enterprise hard drive?

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