Lynnfield pre-order listings hit the web

The Lynnfield launch can’t be that far off, what with both the Taiwanese rumor mill and Kingston pointing to a September release. Now, as PC World reports, some online retailers have even started offering Core i5 processors for pre-order.

Both Computer Connection and FadFusion.com list a "Core i5-570" processor with a 2.66GHz clock speed and 8MB of cache. The sites charge $243.99 and $232.99, respectively.

A Google search for the product code (BX80605I5750) finds even more listings elsewhere in the world, although some places call the processor "Core i5-750." Since the product code ends with "I5750," that may well be the right name. A Chinese website recently benchmarked a purported Lynnfield CPU with that very name and similar specifications, too.

Speaking of which, the benchmarks also included a Lynnfield-based "Core i7-870." Swap out the end of the product code with "I7870," enter into Google, and… hey, look at that: another Computer Connection listing. This time, the e-tailer charges $678.99 for the pre-order, and it quotes a 2.93GHz clock speed and 8MB of cache.

Comments closed
    • snakeoil
    • 10 years ago

    whats wrong with intel?
    700 dollars for a crippled core i5? and they plan to discontinue the core i7 920 (which is the only affordable).
    it seems that intel thinks their users are so brainwashed with publicity that they can abuse them every time they want.
    anyway not my bussines, im interested in the new triple core laptops that amd is about to release.

      • MadManOriginal
      • 10 years ago

      Your trolls are just getting retarded, they used to be funny but you’re just ignoring facts and mixing things up now. First, that’s a preorder jacked up price, second the list price for the not i5 but b[

    • ironoutsider
    • 10 years ago

    CooL! I’m kind of having trouble trying to figure out what to do with all this CPU power nowadays. My Phenom II X3 720 seems to do everything I ask it to do very well… What would someone use so much CPU for?

      • gamerguy76
      • 10 years ago

      Video encoding. You can’t get enough power ever.

      • Forge
      • 10 years ago

      Any time you do video encoding, you become seriously CPU-limited. I routinely peg out my i7-920@3.6 and all threads loaded for 8 hours or more.

      If Intel were to announce a Core i9-1066, 6c/12t and 3.2GHz, with Turbo to 3.6 or 3.8, they could ask over 1000$ and I’d be seriously considering it.

      • OneArmedScissor
      • 10 years ago

      For audio production, you can never really have enough, either. It’s not that you can’t get away with the average dual-core CPU, but the more power you have, the more you get to play with things all at once, with no compromises.

      I know some recording programs will distribute the load evenly over at least 8 cores, but that’s a bizarre exception, as it’s not necessarily parallel operation. It’s actually just dividing up tons of smaller programs (potentially hundreds) between all the cores.

      But I still feel the same way. Other than that, why all that power? Even dual-cores are overkill for so much.

      In this day and age of “going green,” you’d think there would be a bigger emphasis on efficiency.

      My friend’s laptop has an old single-core Athlon 64 that sometimes gets stuck at the minimum 4x multiplier, making it only 800 MHz. The thing is, though, you don’t even notice when that happens, unless you try to do something extremely CPU intensive. There’s no discernible difference between 800 MHz and 2.2 GHz for everyday things…on an “obsolete” single-core.

    • albundy
    • 10 years ago

    LMAO! I knew this would happen. the i7 variant is $199 at microcenter! glad i didnt wait for this…

      • MadManOriginal
      • 10 years ago

      Well these are silly preorder prices :p Who knows what MC will do for ‘private label’ versions of LGA1156 CPUs? But yeah the i7-920 at $200 from MC is a great price.

    • MadManOriginal
    • 10 years ago

    Silly preorder prices.

    Anyhow the Core i7 860 looks to be the best option for those who were holding out from LGA1336 but want maximum threads.

    • Ryhadar
    • 10 years ago

    $700.00 for the Core i7 870!? Even the Core i5-570 is pretty expensive for “mainstream”. Wonder how much of the price is inflated for pre-order?

      • Ikeoth
      • 10 years ago

      The problem for us, with Intel with being the performance leader, is there is no price wars at the upper range and ppl have to over pay. I remember AMD doing something similar when the ClawHammer started trouncing Intel’s Netburst. All companies do it when they have advantage, they start creating additional price points with little difference and charging a premium for the whole Kit-N-Kaboodle cause they know they are untouchable…

      AKA Consumers need competition to win otherwise we would still be paying 999$ for 3.2 GHz net burst CPUs

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