Over 22% of laptops shipped last quarter were netbooks

The arrival of consumer ultraportable laptops did little to slow down the netbook boom last quarter. According to the latest numbers from DisplaySearch, netbooks accounted for an impressive 22.2% of worldwide portable PC shipments in Q2.

DisplaySearch says netbooks only accounted for 17.8% of shipments in the first quarter. That contradicts the firm’s own May 13 report, in which "preliminary data" pinned that number at 19.5%. In any case, netbook shipments reportedly grew a cool 40% between the first and second quarters.

DisplaySearch’s data also show most netbooks went to North America and the "Europe, Middle East, and Africa" region (which is just a tad too big and diverse to provoke any specific conclusions). The Greater China and Latin America markets accounted for fewer netbook shipments, but interestingly, they received more netbooks than proper laptops.

This quarter’s report doesn’t include vendor market share numbers. However, DisplaySearch comments that Asus "has been steadily losing share because Tier 1 brands like Acer, HP, Dell, Lenovo and Toshiba have become increasingly aggressive in this segment." Asus was sitting in second place with a 15.3% share last quarter, according to the preliminary Q1 data.

Comments closed
    • SubSeven
    • 10 years ago

    Ummm, question. How exactly is a netbook defined by all of these market research “analysts”? Does anyone know? The term netbook was only recently coined. When does a “proper” notebook become no longer proper and turn into a netbook? Is it under a certain price? Or is it the screen size?

      • dpaus
      • 10 years ago

      Microsoft uses screen size. Once you go past a certain size (10″, I think – can anyone confirm?) you are no longer eligible for the Windows 7 “Starter Edition”

    • flip-mode
    • 10 years ago

    Can we all just try not to feed the troll.

    • dpaus
    • 10 years ago

    Some of us on the Palm forum were just commenting on how they announced a small, Linux-based laptop – 10″ screen – in May of 2007. It was light on CPU power and storage, but big on portability. Neat-o feature: it would synchronize with the apps on your Palm OS or Windows Mobile cell phone. They called it the Foleo. They were roundly scorned by the tech press for thinking anyone would be interested in such a small, underpowered device, even if it was only $399. Chagrined, they dropped it.

    My, how times have changed.

    • StuG
    • 10 years ago

    I have a netbook, but all i do is take it to class and write notes on it…other than that its useless
    but granted, states above is a pretty big use in my college life
    would never take it as a main computer though, those are the only people i feel bad for. Have an ultra-portable 8.5hr machine though is nice

    • talktojld
    • 10 years ago

    Actually a netbook is exactly what many people need…

    Unfortunately someone things it’s what everyone wants…

    • pluscard
    • 10 years ago

    Wonder how many will be smart enough to return them?

    • flip-mode
    • 10 years ago

    I feel sorry for anyone out there who bought one of these things instead of, and not in addition to, a full fledged laptop and are now probably regretting it, at least I feel bad for the ones who were not warned before making the purchase.

      • ironoutsider
      • 10 years ago

      While normally I would probably say, Oh well, they are stupid and deserve what they get for the abnormal stupidity they possess. I think it is up to the those of us who are not technologically impaired to educate the helpless people who ask. It IS NOT UP TO US to support their failure to operate computers, but merely to inform them, that the netbook they are about to buy is a 3 lb box of feces. Ahhh… I still don’t feel sorry for em though.

      • barleyguy
      • 10 years ago

      I’m not sure why you’d feel sorry for them. As evidenced by a poll on this very site, most people that own netbooks actually enjoy them and are satisfied with the performance. I’m not sure what there is to feel sorry about.

        • Ryhadar
        • 10 years ago

        I think that’s because we know what kind of niche netbooks are filling in our lives. There are people out there that think that a netbook can replace their primary computer and, while it depends on the person, on the whole I’d say that netbooks are best as a secondary computer.

          • CampinCarl
          • 10 years ago

          I’d like to hear your reasons behind that.

            • flip-mode
            • 10 years ago

            low res display
            no optical drive
            less storage capacity
            very low GPU power
            very low CPU power
            small keyboards

            Some newer netbooks have started to address display resolution and storage capacity and keyboard size.

            None the less, that is a very good list of reasons that a netbook could make for a very bad primary computer. For a lot of people they might not be an issue, but for a lot of people they certainly will be.

            It’s a good question – maybe it could be put to a TR poll – are you comfortable having a netbook as your only computer or as your most powerful computer.

            • CampinCarl
            • 10 years ago

            And this is a reply to Ryhadar as well since you both brought up almost identical points.

            While I concede that all those points are true…I don’t see how many of those matter to 60-70% of the “Computer-Using” Population. These are the people who check email, browse the web, do online shopping. The ones I could see being an issue:
            Low Resolution:
            Obnoxious, but possible to fix with an external monitor while at home.

            Small Keyboards:
            Annoying for anyone with good-sized hands.

            Granted, someone could spend another $100 (about the price of an external monitor) and get a 15″ Laptop with similar or slightly better specs, however these are not nearly as portable as a 10″ machine (which, for example, a woman could fit a Wind in her purse).

            • flip-mode
            • 10 years ago

            You could be right, especially about the two most off-putting aspects being resolution and keyboard. Perhaps the rest of the specs will suit the average user just fine. I also think the lack of an optical drive is a pretty big deal, and if any of those users want to rip CDs ( a pretty common use ), they could be put off by the slow processor, well, if they had an optical drive to rip CDs with. But, the good news is that if those are the biggest issues they are issues that can be seen with the naked eye – you don’t have to read a review online to see that it doesn’t have an optical drive and the keyboard is too small and so is the screen.

            • Lans
            • 10 years ago

            I thought I saw some mention of that some time ago:

            ‘ABI Research Survey: 79% of Respondents View Netbooks as “Secondary” Devices’

            Although, I wonder what will the general size of a “mature netbook market”… 🙂

            • Ryhadar
            • 10 years ago

            Like I said it depends on the person but netbooks target internet usage primarily. Reasons why I think it should be best used as a secondary computer:

            1.) Screen size. Not much on most netbooks.
            2.) Lack of a DVD drive on most models. No watching DVDs unless you pay for an external*
            3.) Performance is slower**
            4.) Can’t really do much 3D gaming on a netbook.
            5.) Sound/speakers are of lesser quality

            I could probably name more if I thought about it harder. Like I said it’s targeted towards a specific use. If all you do is browse the internet then that’s one thing (and even then a netbook comes up short in some areas) but that’s just a small part of what a computer is capable of. It targets a niche that netbooks accommodate very well.

            I own the Gateway LT3103u and I use it for college as a very portable, light machine that I can take notes on, little bit of web development, and browse the internet on a 5-6 hour charge. My desktop can’t do some of those things (portability most notably), and even my brother’s laptop can’t do some of those things (battery life and lightness notably). But when I come home I use the desktop, and I find this setup to be very effective. I could not do the things I need to do on just my desktop or just my netbook/ultra-portable. I imagine other people, if they can afford it, are in a similar position.

            I’ve also seen research that also suggests that this is true as well.

            *I say buy an external because the average user probably won’t know workarounds.
            **relative, but true

            • Anomymous Gerbil
            • 10 years ago

            You (and others) are falling into the classic TR mistake of assuming you know the requirements of people who buy these things, and that their requirements are as high as many of the people who visit this site.

            You don’t, and they’re not.

            If you said something like “I wonder how many people boguht these and only later regretted their decision, realising the devices weren’t powerful enough for their requirements”, then that would make sense. But to just state that these things aren’t powerful/big/whatever enough is just silly.

            • yogibbear
            • 10 years ago

            I have one. I also have a PC. I can use the netbook while i’m on the couch. Maybe if someone sold a thin 17″ screen with a keyboard that bluetoothed into my PC with all the performance of my PC then i’d use that instead. But that doesn’t exist. So if i want to just browse the web etc. on my netbook or play some fallout 2 on the couch… do i care what you think if i am happy with what it can do?

            • Ryhadar
            • 10 years ago

            I didn’t do that though. CampinCarl asked my reasons as to why I thought a netbook is best used as a secondary computer and I just voiced my opinions.

            Can a netbook be used as a primary computer? Sure, but I think it’s important to tell people who ask what they’re getting in to. As you pointed out: people differ in their requirements.

        • flip-mode
        • 10 years ago

        I’ve heard of polls of “normal users” that only 60ish percent of them are really satisfied with their purchase. I think I read that at theinquirer.

      • dpaus
      • 10 years ago

      My girlfriend got one of the Asus EeeEe PCs (partly on my recommendation, partly because she thought it was “cute” even if it wasn’t available in purple). She uses it to surf the web, e-mail, IM, etc., from the couch. She has access to three of my laptops, and won’t touch them anymore (THANK YOU, ASUS!!!). For her usage, it’s perfect.

    • snakeoil
    • 10 years ago

    what’s wrong with intel?

    you can find the answer in my blog.

    §[<http://the-end-of-evil.blogspot.com/<]§

      • Creamsteak
      • 10 years ago

      Awesome. The more you know.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 10 years ago

        Knowing is half the battle. GeeeeIIIIIII JOEEEEEE!

      • Lans
      • 10 years ago

      Don’t see how that is related to this but posted a reply to your blog. XD

      • pullmyfoot
      • 10 years ago

      whats wrong with you? how old are you anyhows

    • ew
    • 10 years ago

    I don’t see a definition of netbook (mini-note) in the article. Kind of hard to get anything useful out of this.

      • ludi
      • 10 years ago

      What do you mean? What do you think a netbook might NOT be that DisplaySearch is accidentally counting or vice versa?

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