Report: Intel plans more dual-core CULV processors

Earlier this month, Asus introduced several UnLimited-series laptops based on a new consumer ultra-low-voltage processor from Intel: the Core 2 Duo SU7300. The processor runs at a similar speed as previous CULV offerings (1.3GHz), but it has two cores—an important distinction. As we saw in our subsequent review of the Asus UL30A, the extra core helps responsiveness and performance quite a bit.

There may be more where that came from. Quoting insiders at notebook manufacturers, DigiTimes now reports that the chipmaker has a whole slew of dual-core CULV processors on the way for next quarter. These new CPUs will apparently replace previous single-core offerings, too, possibly ushering a new wave of more powerful consumer ultraportables.

Reportedly, Core 2 Solo SU3000-series processors will make way for Core 2 Duo SU7000-series chips like the SU7300. The Pentium SU2700 will be replaced by Core 2 Duo SU4000-series CPUs, and Intel will roll out dual-core Celeron SU3000 processors at the low-end. Existing Celeron 700-series chips like the 723 will remain.

Intel’s price list (PDF) shows the chipmaker already sells one dual-core CULV Celeron, the 1.2GHz SU2300, which is priced at $134. DigiTimes doesn’t talk about this processor’s fate, although perhaps the Celeron SU3000 mention was a typo and really referred to it. We’ll probably find out for sure next quarter.

Comments closed
    • mattthemuppet
    • 13 years ago

    no, I hadn’t forgotten, just didn’t realise that the CPUs in the Air are ULV models and therefore part of a different range.

    As someone else also pointed out, ULV CPUs also have a different TDP range to CULV ones which, along with price, probably forces this segmentation.

    • adisor19
    • 13 years ago

    You must be new here. Welcome 🙂

    Adi

    • Shining Arcanine
    • 13 years ago

    Why is this a problem? Old chip designs = cheap chip designs

    The cost of R&D for these is already paid and improvements in the fabrication process as it continues to mature will only mean that it becomes cheaper. This is precisely why the Z80 is still in production.

    • maxxcool
    • 13 years ago

    /fall to a fetal position and cries/

    • thesaint
    • 13 years ago

    what’s wrong with intel?.

    • adisor19
    • 13 years ago

    Ya, i was looking at the Z600 over on the Dell Canada site and while it does have some good potential, its current 16″ dimensions make it a no no.

    Now, take that laptop and make a 13″ version of it, and i know quite a few peeps that would be interested in it.

    Adi

    • Skrying
    • 13 years ago

    Compare those worthless CULV packing 15 inchers out on the market now to a 15 inch with a SP9600. Nearly all of the main power users are the same. Screen, graphics (let’s give both Intel graphics), memory amount and speed, hard drive, wireless, etc, etc. I am willing to bet the CULV packing unit will nab 7 to 8 hours while the SP9600 will be lucky to get 4 to 5, if that. That’s a HUGE difference.

    There are some exceptions but those are rare.

    • OneArmedScissor
    • 13 years ago

    Eh, almost never? There are tons of comparisons between different laptops, but I’ve never once seen an apples to apples comparison between CPUs.

    They’re going to vary, as all chips do, but drastically? I really doubt it. They’re all very minimal, and there’s much less room for variation there than if they were running higher clock speeds and voltages.

    • Skrying
    • 13 years ago

    You know… people always mention this but it virtually never pans out to be that way in real products. The SL9600, SU9600 and SP9600 all have identical voltage ranges but I have a funny feeling they’d have drastically different battery life numbers under the TR battery life tests.

    • Skrying
    • 13 years ago

    Nothing off the top of my head matches everything the Air has. The Air is a testament to what can be created when you ignore much of the conventions of what is expected in a laptop. Of course, ignoring that “at least two USB ports” convention is enough to make me not consider it.

    I do think there are a few laptops coming down the pipeline that might compare. I’m personally very curious to see how Dell’s Latitude Z series shapes up. They announced a 16 inch model and put it up for purchase on the site. But for everything it does right it does something else wrong.

    There is that Sony Vaio that is going to have a super pricey tag but no word on the hardware really. Comparable in size, weight and better in battery life though.

    • OneArmedScissor
    • 13 years ago

    But that’s TDP, not idle power. They’re probably all running the same voltages, which should put them at the same power use, but under load, the faster one is going to get hotter.

    • OneArmedScissor
    • 13 years ago

    That’s what I’m wondering about these.

    The CULV CPUs themselves aren’t really new, just the branding. They had similar models with both 65nm and the early 45nm Core 2s/Pentiums/Celerons, but they were always more expensive. In those cases, they were undoubtedly the same thing, but cost more because they were set up differently and sold in lower volumes.

    But even now, they really do appear to be drastically underclocked, run of the mill, Core 2s. There’s no magic pixie dust, to my knowledge. If they want to package more of them as CULV CPUs, because the faster Core 2s are falling out of favor, they certainly have that option.

    The amount of different models suggests they’re shifting a large amount of mobile Core 2 production towards CULV. There are most of the same variations and binning levels between the chips as with the normal mobile range.

    If they’re all dual-core now, that suggests that really all they’ve done is changed the standards for voltage and clock speeds. That would explain why the prices have gone down for CULV (they’re “normal” now), while faster Core 2s have stayed up (they sell fewer).

    • ImSpartacus
    • 13 years ago

    Not to mention battery life. If wikipedia is to be trusted those processors are 17w, not 10w like the SU7300. The prices don’t look that different, but OEM prices like those aren’t always what companies actually pay.

    • adisor19
    • 13 years ago

    Thanks. I was looking to see if there is anything out there even remotely close to the MacBook Air.. this ain’t it.

    Adi

    • Skrying
    • 13 years ago

    The HP EliteBook 2530p has both the SL9600 and SL9400 available, that’s the 2.13Ghz and 1.8Ghz processors inside the Air. I’m sure a few more could be found with a bit of searching. It isn’t exactly a commonly used part even in the ULV market.

    • adisor19
    • 13 years ago

    Do you mind pointing out to me what models are those ? I’m especially looking for the ones that use the 2.1Ghz version that’s in the MacBook Air.

    Adi

    • ssidbroadcast
    • 13 years ago

    Hm. Is the 45nm silicon for CULV different from 45nm C2D ?

    • OneArmedScissor
    • 13 years ago

    I’m curious if this is a more creative attempt to dump Core 2 stock before Westmere comes out, rather than postponing its launch, as they did with Clarksfield. This time, they have the motivation of increased margins.

    It is looking as if very soon, there will not be a reason for laptop Core 2s of any form to exist anymore. The power use, especially idle, is ridiculously low on the standard Westmere /[

    • maxxcool
    • 13 years ago

    This is more of a reply to the xp-mode in windows-7. As I read the part where the Pentium part gets the boot it became more obvious.

    I like the idea of a 1.3-1.4 ghz dual core part…..

    As for the 1.8ghz mac part, if i remember right anand did a bit and found that the apple intel part was custom at the time, and likely is geared for them in terms of production and packaging. Shame though… its also a great low power dual core part.

    • Skrying
    • 13 years ago

    You’re forgetting what the C in CULV stands for; consumer. There are several laptops on the market with the same 1.8Ghz Core 2 Duo found in the MacBook Air. That processor costs a lot more than what the CULV line up is intended for.

    Intel want’s to keep that distinction. It has clear financial benefits for them.

    • mattthemuppet
    • 13 years ago

    nothing above the SU9400 on the way? 1.4GHz dual core isn’t bad, but I wonder why there’s nothing like the 1.8GHz dual core found in the Mac Air, especially for the larger form factor CULV notebooks.

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