New Toshiba laptops are small, cheap, have optional dual cores

Speak of the devil. Earlier this morning, Toshiba announced a pair of new consumer ultraportable laptops that will offer users a choice between a single-core processor and one of those dual-core, SU4000-series Pentiums we were just talking about.

The new series comprises the 13.3" Satellite T135 and the 11.6" Satellite T115. Along with the aforementioned CPU choice, both systems will include DDR3 memory, 250GB of 5,400-RPM mechanical storage, 802.11n Wi-Fi, HDMI out, powered eSATA/USB combo ports, multi-touch touchpads, and six-cell batteries with "up to 9 hours of battery life."

The new Satellites will both ship with Windows 7 Home Premium. As a result, Toshiba doesn’t plan to release them until the new operating system comes out on October 22.

The Satellite T115 will start at just $449.99 with a weight of 3.49 lbs and either red or black finishes. You’ll have to plunk down $599.99 for the bigger Satellite T135, which will weigh a slightly heftier 3.88 lbs. Toshiba will offer Bluetooth and a white finish as options for that model, though.

Comments closed
    • MadManOriginal
    • 13 years ago

    Well yeah idling they use very little but none of the battery life tests done by review sites are in real idle mode.

    • mattthemuppet
    • 13 years ago

    true, but when these CULV laptops are idling ~8-10W and averaging no more than 15W in normal use, 0.5-1W savings have a considerable impact on battery life.

    Otherwise, why bother turning wifi and bluetooth off? I wouldn’t have thought either of those draws much more than 1-2W (though I have no figures yet).

    • Tanj
    • 13 years ago

    It’s amazing how quickly prices have come down on things like this. I’ve got a Fujitsu T2100 which is a tablet but the size and battery life is similar to these new machines. 12″ screen, ULV Dual Core Proc, 7200 rpm hard drive, and with the wifi off and the 9 cell battery in place I can really get 8+ hours of usage. With wifi on i can still top 6. The weight is just over 4 pounds with the big battery and it’s the perfect portable machine. These new machines will be even slimmer, cheaper, and better performance. Win win all around.

    • BlackStar
    • 13 years ago

    Sounds good then. The g4x have semi-acceptable drivers, at least on Linux.

    That said, I’m still waiting for a small, portable, dual-core laptop with a Nvidia or Ati IGP, decent battery life and screen. Just need something with decent OpenGL support – not for playing games, but for developing them.

    • thesaint
    • 13 years ago
    • thecoldanddarkone
    • 13 years ago

    At the very least it’s a varient of g4x series. The GMA 950 doesn’t support ddr3. That means it’s fast enough for any of my non gaming uses.

    • BlackStar
    • 13 years ago

    That, and no information on the IGP. We can only hope it is not the dreaded GMA 950…

    • TO11MTM
    • 13 years ago

    SIMPSONS ALREADY DID IT!

    No, but seriously, I’ve had an ASUS X83VM-X1 since Febuary, and it’s got ESATA, HDMI, and a heck of a lot of hardware for the money. Aside from the sad 1366×768 resolution it was a steal.

    Heck, I’m amazed ASUS Didn’t make it a tiny bit smaller, pull out the 9600m GS, and call it a netbook and add 250$ to the price.

    • ludi
    • 13 years ago

    All hail the post-netbooks.

    Note to the bashers: You wouldn’t have these options if it weren’t for Atom and Eee!

    • jon_lui
    • 13 years ago

    YES! Finally esata ports on a laptop woopee!

    I like how OEMs are starting to increases the processor performance on the “netbooks”. At first we only have atom processors (which are too weak for my taste). Then they started bringing out the Core solos – which are modern processors but in 2009 it is unforgivable to have a computer with less then 2 cores. Finally! Finally, the low end of the performance spectrum is looking promising with dual core processors.

    Perhaps it is only me, but I’m willing to pay $100-200 more and have 1-2 hours lower battery life to switch out the atom for these duo core ULV processors which can do more.

    • MadManOriginal
    • 13 years ago

    Fortunately we don’t have to look far to find some numbers:
    §[<http://www.techreport.com/articles.x/17010/13<]§ Looks like <=1W difference so yeah, a small impact on battery life.

    • OneArmedScissor
    • 13 years ago

    Newer 2.5″ drives have very similar power draw to some of the more efficient SSDs.

    Depending on what you compare to what, there are certain 2.5″ drives that do better than certain SSDs. 1.8″ drives should easily be able to match them. It’s not as if you can just blindly stick an SSD into any laptop and miraculously increase the battery life.

    You have to remember that comparisons to 3.5″ bazillion-platter desktop hard drives, which is generally what you’re going to see looking over SSD articles, aren’t even close to appropriate for gauging the benefits to a laptop. Some of those drives may use a few watts, but 2.5″ drives have much smaller and lighter platters (and usually just one), spinning at a much lower speed.

    Consider it something along the lines of a little fan. You don’t see anyone complaining about the power use on those. :p

    • derFunkenstein
    • 13 years ago

    I’ve never seen moving to an SSD reflected all that much in battery life benchmarks. But yet I always see this assertion everywhere. Does not compute.

    • Sargent Duck
    • 13 years ago

    Don’t forget the big power savings SDD’s bring. I’d like to see more enter the fray (there are cheap low performance SDD’s out there) which would help every laptop.

    • OneArmedScissor
    • 13 years ago

    l[<(Hopefully AMD can give Intel some stiff competition somewhere in the range to keep it going.) <]l I'm dying to see what Athlon IIs do for idle power. That's going to make or break them. They've got the rest of it down, but that's been an issue with AMD vs. Intel laptops for as long as I can remember.

    • ImSpartacus
    • 13 years ago

    Yes, we finally hit that performance delta where manufacturers can stop pushing the performance and start working on price and battery life. Atom is a testament to this (although a touch light on the performance for my tastes).

    • ImSpartacus
    • 13 years ago

    That 11.6″ model looks nice enough. Good, modern processor, but no word on the resolution (1366×768?). I’ll bide my time to see what the competition does.

    • UberGerbil
    • 13 years ago

    No details on the screen resolution, though I have to assume it’s the usual 1280×720 or 1366×768. And a 5400rpm HD, though that should be easy to fix.

    Still, between Atom netbooks redefining the low end (pulling true ultra-portables into reasonable pricepoints in the process), Clarksfield at the high end, Arrandale on its way to redefine the mainstream, and Win7 to run it all, we seem to be entering a sort of golden age for consumer notebooks.

    (Hopefully AMD can give Intel some stiff competition somewhere in the range to keep it going.)

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This

Share this post with your friends!