CyberLink speeds up photo, video apps with GPUs

A year on from the release of Elemental’s Badaboom, GPU-compute acceleration for consumer video apps seems to have creeped into the mainstream. Earlier today, CyberLink and Nvidia announced "unique new features and significantly improved performance" now available in CyberLink’s suite of photo- and video-editing applications.

The acceleration features span the following apps:

  • MediaShow 5, a photo and video management application that uses graphics processors to accelerate face detection and video conversion. Facial recognition gets a speed boost of up to 70% from a GPU, while video encoding can speed up by as much as 500%. CyberLink stresses that the face tagging acceleration "is only available to owners of NVIDIA GeForce GPUs." (The video conversion part runs on AMD graphics cards.)
  • MediaShow Espresso, which lets uses transcode video into handheld video formats. This app "has been further accelerated with today’s update to as much as 500% faster than an average CPU," CyberLink says. Here, too, both AMD and Nvidia GPUs are supported.
  • PowerDirector 8, a consumer video-editing app with high-definition video support. The software supports both GPU-accelerated special effects and GPU-accelerated video encoding. Video transcoding also works on AMD hardware.

Also, you’ll find GPU-acceleration features in CyberLink’s PowerProducer 5 authoring software and the PowerDVD 9 video player, which uses graphics hardware to speed up DVD upscaling.

We swung by CyberLink’s software update page, but the firm offers no new GPU-related updates for any of the aforementioned apps just yet. As far as we can tell, though, these apps already supported some level of GPU acceleration when they came out.

Comments closed
    • stdRaichu
    • 10 years ago

    Are there any professional/”prosumer”-level encoders that use GPU acceleration? All of the consumer ones I’ve seen have been utter junk in terms of quality, not to mention often being highly limited in terms of what resolutions they support.

    Encoding speed isn’t much of an issue for me (rather take time doing it at excellent quality than do it quickly – it’s the same amount of human effort for either), but if I can accelerate via OpenCL or whatever for no loss then that’d be awesome. Sad to say most codecs compatible with most video editors don’t appear to be jumping on the GPU bandwagon yet, at least from what I’ve seen.

    • Vaughn
    • 10 years ago

    that might apply if I actually said anything about AMD or NV in this topic 😛

    • HighTech4US
    • 10 years ago

    Ignore: Should have been reply to #15

    • MadManOriginal
    • 10 years ago

    Gosh this has been a long time coming. Now since I’m not apt to pay for such software where are the open source GPU accelerated equivalents?

    • bcronce
    • 10 years ago

    “The biggest speed increases come from some format to MP4. Still, the speed increases were enough in my testing to spend the dollars on the software so I’m happy.”

    How fast is it on your machine? My 920 i7 does xvid set to Maximum quality on 1920×1080 fraps dumps does ~55fps at 40% cpu. My HD get’s pegged. So 100% cpu would be about 120fps?

    How much faster is your GPU?

    • flip-mode
    • 10 years ago

    I’ve been looking into video editors a whole lot recently. Power Director 8 has at least one HUGE flaw – it’s basically unusable in windowed mode and has to be full screen. This is because the interface does not resize at all and arranges itself according to the monitor’s resolution only. What the heck? Is this the dawn of the GUI or something that they could even “overlook” such a thing?

    So, GPU acceleration be damned, I put Sony Vegas Movie Studio on my xmas list. It really is the best package anyway, of all the “consumer level” video editors out there, but it has the steepest learning curve, or so I read.

      • fdisker
      • 10 years ago

      The windowed mode flaw was fixed with the build 2220 update, released on 10/29.

        • flip-mode
        • 10 years ago

        Ah ha! Very good to know. I guess they didn’t bother to fix it with their trial download.

    • fdisker
    • 10 years ago

    As a user of both Powerdirector 8 and MediaShowEsspresso I can attest to the GPU acceleration features. Both packages encode movies from my sony hi def camcorder to MP4 about four times faster than my previous editor, Pinnacle Studio 11. What Cyberlink conveniently forgets to tell you is that not all encoding formats are GPU accelerated. For example, when encoding to WMV you don’t get any help from your nvidia or ati card. The biggest speed increases come from some format to MP4. Still, the speed increases were enough in my testing to spend the dollars on the software so I’m happy.

    • HighTech4US
    • 10 years ago

    How about an actual performance review of these three apps on both nVidia and AMD hardware spanning the high to low end. I am so tired of seeing “Up to” and “Average CPU” in these press releases.

    Come on TR do a FULL review.

      • Scrotos
      • 10 years ago

      Are they using CUDA and Brook+/Stream, or are they using OpenCL for the features where both graphics cards work? That is what you’d want to know before doing a real head-to-head test.

      Depends on if you want TR to review the software product or if you want TR to use that as a comparative benchmark for various video cards being used as compute devices instead of 3D display devices. I kind of don’t care, personally, what CyberLink’s claims are and what the “truth” is for their claims. I’m more interested in the utility of the application as a benchmark, though again, would prefer it to use a common API instead of each vendors’ proprietary implementations.

        • HighTech4US
        • 10 years ago

        I want TR to review this software product as a comparative benchmark for various video cards being used as compute devices instead of 3D display devices.

        Using this real application that states it will run on both AMD and nVidia hardware will give a clear picture of what hardware to purchase.

        • stmok
        • 10 years ago

        r[

      • OneArmedScissor
      • 10 years ago

      §[<http://www.hexus.net/content/item.php?item=20825<]§ They had some peculiar findings.

        • HighTech4US
        • 10 years ago

        Too bad the review was for only one high end card from each vendor.

        I am hoping that a better review will show a lot more cards as not everyone can afford or own the latest and greatest.

    • Jigar
    • 10 years ago

    Good to see application supporting both the competitors … Time to see the review, which cards serves better. But looking at Nvidia’s tactics, it’s pretty clear they are winner to begin with.

      • HighTech4US
      • 10 years ago

      nVidia tactics – Give me a break.

      nVidia

      #1 produced the development tools (compilers, debuggers, etc)
      #2 developed the CUDA API
      #3 seeded universities with hardware and software to help accelerate GPU parallel computing
      #4 fully supports OpenCL, DirectCompute
      #5 All GPU accelerated software can run on 8400GS or newer hardware
      §[<http://www.nvidia.com/object/cuda_learn_products.html<]§ If CyberLink decided that the MediaShow was not beneficial on AMD hardware maybe it was because of AMDs lack of vision with their previous generation of hardware in GPU computing.

        • Game_boy
        • 10 years ago

        AMD has 1 and 2 (Stream), decided not to spend the money on 3 (has Nvidia got hard returns from the cash it spent on it? Tesla isn’t much of their revenue, and Quadro share is stable), does 4 and supports compute on all cards 2400 or newer, about the same as Nvidia.

        But they don’t advertise it as much. I agree there.

          • insulin_junkie72
          • 10 years ago

          It’s not just advertising, but support down to more of a grass-root level.

          There’s even a number of smaller programs/projects for various video functions that use CUDA (some free, some not), and from what I’ve seen, generally the developers seem to note Nvidia bent over backwards to help with CUDA – even on what are one-man shows and not a big company like Cyberlink.

          Nvidia does seem pretty committed to CUDA.

            • Game_boy
            • 10 years ago

            Will it make them money? No evidence either way yet. If it does, and the focus on it doesn’t take away from their gaming graphics business, then it’s a good idea.

          • HighTech4US
          • 10 years ago

          > decided not to spend the money on 3 (has Nvidia got hard returns from the cash it spent on it?

          The students who have gone through these courses are the programmers today who are developing GPU applications. These applications get us to want a GPU. Classic chicken and egg.

          This is money well spent.

          > AMD does 4 and supports compute on all cards 2400 or newer, about the same as Nvidia.

          Sorry you are very wrong here about AMD:

          HD2000/HD3000 lack CS support and do not have shared memory, so no DirectCompute and OpenCL for them.

          §[<http://forum.beyond3d.com/showthread.php?t=55155&page=2<]§ See what I mean by AMD/ATI lack of vision on the GPU compute side. You might want to read these two informative articles from Jon Peddle for both the history of GPU computing and why nVidia is the one leading the charge: Different strokes: AMD and Nvidia’s approaches are diverging in more ways than one §[<http://jonpeddie.com/blogs/comments/different-strokes-amd-and-nvidias-approaches-are-diverging-in-more-ways-tha<]§ Nvidia and Starting the Next Age of Super Computing §[<http://jonpeddie.com/blogs/comments/nvidia-and-starting-the-next-age-of-super-computing<]§

        • Jigar
        • 10 years ago

        What gameboy said…

          • ironoutsider
          • 10 years ago

          I can definitely see gpu assisted computing becoming more and more of an important section of technology. IT might even accelerate OS’s in the near future, wouldn’t that be something! IF windows automatically assigned tasks to your gpu for processing! I’m sure I’m too ignorant to know wtf i’m talking about, but I think GPU computing is gonna be around to stay and if a graphic card company decides to abandon it, it’s gonna hurt in the wallet.

        • Vaughn
        • 10 years ago

        Defensive much HighTech4US??

        do you own NV stock lol

          • HighTech4US
          • 10 years ago

          Touchy much Vaughn??. Does that mean you own AMD stock : lol.

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