iSuppli: DDR3 to become dominant by next June

DDR3 could be just months away from unseating DDR2 as the leading system memory type for PCs. In its latest report, iSuppli says it expects DDR3 to account for 50.9% of global DRAM shipments by the second quarter of 2010, before going on to make up 71% of shipments by the end of that same year.

For reference, the market research firm points out that DDR3 only made up 1% of shipments in the second quarter of 2008 and 14.2% in the second quarter of this year. Shipments climbed to 23% last quarter, and iSuppli reckons they’ll go up another nine points this quarter.

The firm credits both Intel’s new, DDR3-only processors as well as the "increasing manufacturability" of the memory technology for this growth. Only relatively pricey Intel Core i5 and i7 processors lack support for DDR2 right now, but next quarter, that same exclusivity will spread to lower price points with the arrival of 32-nm, dual-core Clarkdale processors.

Recent changes in pricing should also help DDR3’s popularity. The memory type still commanded a premium when we looked at prices for 4GB kits less than three months ago, but today, the situation has almost reversed. The cheapest 4GB DDR3 kit on Newegg will only set you back $72.99, but getting 4GB of DDR2 means shelling out at least $79.99. (Both kits come with free shipping.) At this rate, iSuppli’s predictions don’t seem all that far-fetched.

Comments closed
    • Farting Bob
    • 10 years ago

    I feel sorry for people that paid 4x DDR2 prices for DDR3 a year or so ago.
    When i next upgrade my CPU and board, mine will have DDR3 goodness, although that could still be more than a year away.

      • SecretMaster
      • 10 years ago

      And I paid ~$200.00 for 2GB DDR2 when it first came out, only to see it drop to something ridiculous like $40.00. Cycle of life/technology. When you need to buy it, you need to buy it.

        • UberGerbil
        • 10 years ago

        I spent $200 for 16_[

          • packfan_dave
          • 10 years ago

          And stored data on cassette tapes or 160K floppies :).

            • UberGerbil
            • 10 years ago

            140K ! (with 16 sector tracks, it was something less than that in the early days.) But you could turn them over and use the other side — you just had to punch a write protect hole in the right place.

      • SomeOtherGeek
      • 10 years ago

      Well, thank/f**k you veru much, sir! 😉

      Of course, we regret it! Doesn’t anyone? You’ll get your new shining MB and RAM, and then in 6 months time, you’ll regret it cuz it will be either better or cheaper than what you paid for. There is just no keeping up with technology. We will always be in its debt.

    • thermistor
    • 10 years ago

    I thought gDDR# for graphics and DDR# were different technologies.

      • grantmeaname
      • 10 years ago

      yeah, you’re right.

      • ub3r
      • 10 years ago

      Look at your monitor, not keyboard, whilst typing.

    • Hattig
    • 10 years ago

    What’s coming after DDR3? I guess it would start entering the market in 2011 or 2012 so it’s presumably past the design stages right now.

      • wira020
      • 10 years ago

      DDR5??… as i see, there’s no ddr4 for graphic card…

      cant wait for the next ddr to come to the market… expecting to see ddr3 price dive when that happen… but how low can it get?

      §[<http://www.interfacebus.com/Memory_Module_DDR4_DIMM.html<]§

        • khands
        • 10 years ago

        GDDR5 showed up around in the 3xxx series with ATI, but offered little to no benefit over GDDR3, the technologies aren’t linked nearly as closely anymore though (GDDR and DDR).

          • SecretMaster
          • 10 years ago

          GDDR4 was featured in the 3xxx series, while GDDR5 was in the 4870. GDDR5 also had huge advantages of GDDR 5 I thought.

          But as far as I know, GDDR != DDR

            • Game_boy
            • 10 years ago

            Yes, they are completely different. GDDR5+ is the next step in that, but no DDR4 mentions yet.

        • UberGerbil
        • 10 years ago

        The numbers on the end have nothing to do with performance. They’re just “generation” or “version numbers” so to speak, and can be skipped without it “meaning” anything. The versioning of GDDR is completely separate from the versioning for DDR, so you can’t infer anything about the latter from the former.

    • dpaus
    • 10 years ago

    Just a matter of time…

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