Clarkdale processors listed, pictured

How about that. A European online retailer has broken the embargo on Intel’s upcoming Clarkdale processors and listed six of them on its website. Shocking, isn’t it? HPM-Computer looks to have pulled down the listings already, but not before the guys at Expreview were able to nab screenshots with all of the dirty details.

Listed processors included the 2.93GHz Core i3-530, 3.06GHz Core i3-540, 3.2GHz Core i5-650, 3.33GHz Core i5-660 and i5-661, and the 3.46GHz Core i5-670. The model names and listed specifications seem to match those leaked by HKEPC in August. According to those specs, Clarkdale-based Core i5 processors will have two cores and four threads, while the i3 models will have only two cores and two threads.

What about pricing? HPM-Computer charges €170 for the Core i5-750, compared to $199.99 for Newegg, so you can probably get a decent idea of U.S. pricing by multiplying the German prices by about 1.176.

That little formula gives us prices of $122 and $142 for the two Core i3s, $189 for the i5-650, $207 for both the i5-660 and i5-661, and $298 for the i5-670—again, pretty much in line with what HKEPC reported. Keep in mind, though, that these prices might be marked up a tad to account for the chips’ current unavailability (because, you know, Intel hasn’t even announced them yet).

Incidentally, while we’re on the subject of Clarkdale, we see TweakTown has posted a photo of a Clarkdale processor with its heatspreader off. The image reveals the teeny, 32-nm processor die and the comparatively larger slab of silicon that houses the integrated graphics core and memory controller, both sitting side by side on the same LGA1156 package.

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    • NeelyCam
    • 10 years ago

    It’s probably correct, just market segmentation. For most purposes, having a 15% “overclock” on an Intel IGP doesn’t matter that much, and i5-661 is missing a bunch of IT features.

    In my book, 650 is still probably the sweetest spot – then again, I’m trying to make a low-power HTPC, and hardware HD decoding already available on all Clarkdales is probably good enough for me.

      • NeelyCam
      • 10 years ago

      Reply fail ftw

    • cocobongo_tm
    • 10 years ago

    Man! Intel is becoming more BMW-ish by the day! 🙂 I mean, BMW has the 3 series, the 5 series and the 7 series (and the 6 series and the 1 series and X series – but those are Bangle’s creation and donnot count).

    Intel has the i3, i5, i7 :). I think I’m gonna go for a i3-320. 🙂 But wait! The 3 series doesn’t get Turbo! So then maybe an I5-535 Turbo? 🙂

    Cheers!

      • smilingcrow
      • 10 years ago

      Pentium = diesel!

        • NeelyCam
        • 10 years ago

        And it sucks that I have to get a coupe – I’ll never live that down.

        FML

    • spanky1off
    • 10 years ago

    can someone explain in laymans terms whats these are for? they sound rubbish!…so i hope im right and can just discount these. maybe theyre trying to cut into amds cheap processor segment?…i dont work with computers so im just curious to know whats the best to go for gaming out of the 1156 or 1366 mainboards and associated processors.

    i was set on the 1156 and i5-750? whats the more futureproof socket?

    also..i think ive gathered im best waiting to buy a motherboard until intel bring chip support for sata 6gb and usb 3? when is this likely to be?
    was hoping to set up q1/q2 next year.

      • UberGerbil
      • 10 years ago

      Clarkdale is for all the “Office” desktops, and all the home users who just browse the web and do email and nothing more graphically challenging than solitaire or bejewelled or maybe the Sims. That’s a huge market, /[http://www.engadget.com/2009/11/04/nvidia-confirms-intel-chipsets-wont-support-usb-3-0-until-2011/<]§

        • NeelyCam
        • 10 years ago

        Now that was just confusing. 🙂 Let me translate:

        If you know what “backwards compatibility” or “socket” means, you already know what to do (=buy AMD if you want to upgrade soon, or buy Intel if you don’t want to friggin get a new CPU every six months).

        If you don’t, you’ll be staring at one of these when your company’s refresh cycle in 2010/2011 is finished, or when you’re at Walmart trying to buy a computer for your college-bound daughter that really wants a Mac. They’ll be cheap, fast, and will do everything you want them to except play games or do the laundry.

    • DaveJB
    • 10 years ago

    Honestly, I think it’s probably less confusing if you ignore the “Core i3/i5/i7” prefix and just focus on the model numbers:

    9×5 – 4 Cores, 8 Threads, Triple-Channel Memory, Higher-speed Cache/Memory Controller
    9×0 – 4 Cores, 8 Threads, Triple-Channel Memory
    8×0 – 4 Cores, 8 Threads, Double-Channel Memory
    7×0 – 4 Cores, 4 Threads, Double-Channel Memory
    6×0 – 2 Cores, 4 Threads, Double-Channel Memory, On-board GPU
    5×0 – 2 Cores, 2 Threads, Double-Channel Memory, On-board GPU

      • wira020
      • 10 years ago

      i9??? 1000+ maybe?

        • Kunikos
        • 10 years ago

        yes, that’s the rumor

          • NeelyCam
          • 10 years ago

          Too many rumors on that one… 1000+ i9? nothing ‘concrete’

          what if gulftown if delayed..?

      • StashTheVampede
      • 10 years ago

      Can you also mix in the mobile parts that do/don’t have the virtualization support?

      • MrDigi
      • 10 years ago

      There is also some turbo mode differences.

      • maroon1
      • 10 years ago

      The Core i3 5×0 supports hyperthreading

    • Meadows
    • 10 years ago

    So tell us, intel, what the f- is the point in having “i#” padded to your products when they change just like model numbers do?

    Wouldn’t it have been simpler to just have a model number and that’s it? You know, like AMD’s been doing with GPUs and CPUs?

    Okay, AMD pads information too, but that’s mostly *[

      • MadManOriginal
      • 10 years ago

      Actually it does have a meaning it’s just more obscured. They could certainly do it a different way though.

      • SamWise
      • 10 years ago

      i3/5/7 = Good/Better/Best.

        • khands
        • 10 years ago

        Good/Better/Best is about the right accuracy too.

        • OneArmedScissor
        • 10 years ago

        You forgot the i9. So really, it goes:

        Good / better / best / “lol I can’t believe people are paying us over $1,000 for a piece of sand”

          • wira020
          • 10 years ago

          lols… but it is confusing… i7 was easy at first.. then comes 1156 with i7 n i5… that messed things up… for 1156, they could have just stayed with i3 for integrated graphic and i5 for non, but perform better….

            • khands
            • 10 years ago

            Honestly, I would’ve much rather had the i7’s stay on the X58, the i5’s on the P55, and the i3’s on whatever they’ll be on, it’d clearly define which market segments are being targeted.

            • NeelyCam
            • 10 years ago

            ^ yes. but if you’re working in an Intel marketing group, you have to make it confusing or you’ll lose your job making it simple.

          • flip-mode
          • 10 years ago

          good / better / best / 9000

          good / better / best / eleventy

        • NeelyCam
        • 10 years ago

        Intel should hire you; you’re already familiar with the new green flavor of koolaid

      • SomeOtherGeek
      • 10 years ago

      C’mon, man! It is marketing 101, the more the people are confused the more f*** ups they will make the more money we get.

      They stole the business practice from nVidia.

        • NeelyCam
        • 10 years ago

        /[

    • Kurotetsu
    • 10 years ago

    This has probably been asked and answered already, but CAN these things drop into a standard P55 board (where the graphics core will be disabled)? Or do you have to have an H57 board for these?

      • ssidbroadcast
      • 10 years ago

      Would you want to? If you already have a p55, chances are you’re already running a faster/more-core processor.

        • Kurotetsu
        • 10 years ago

        I’m still running a P45 system. I am asking in case I choose to upgrade to a P55 system in the future.

        • smilingcrow
        • 10 years ago

        There are reasons to use a Clarkdale in a P55 board; if you can’t get a decent H5x board that fits your requirements then get a P55.
        Some people are perfectly happy with the best dual-core CPU and this should be it and definitely in terms of performance per watt.

        The prices for these if true seem nuts when compared to Lynnfield. When you consider that the IGP on an integrated chipset seems to be almost free I don’t expect to pay much for this GPU.

        Maybe it’s a first generation thing where it just doesn’t make sense but it’s a necessary step to something down the line that does.

          • NeelyCam
          • 10 years ago

          Not to mention, this is a killer platform for HTPCs.
          The only thing missing is fanless coolers; the current passive ones are too friggin’ large.

            • shank15217
            • 10 years ago

            How is it more “killer” than a AMD 785G+CPU platform?

            • UberGerbil
            • 10 years ago

            It’s not, but it’s killer _[

            • NeelyCam
            • 10 years ago

            Um, it most certainly is a killer across the board – not just Intel. AMD doesn’t have an answer to this. MiniITX i3/i5 will beat AMD MiniITX in power consumption, noise and CPU performance, and will have all the bells and whistles for HTPC (dual-HD hardware decode, bitstream pass-through for HDMI).

            • shank15217
            • 10 years ago

            And also cost more than twice as much, its hardly killer anything.

            • NeelyCam
            • 10 years ago

            Maybe you should go count the dollars again once the i3’s and H55’s are official… Right now it seems that it’ll be $200 flat, and about 2x the performance compared to the AMD version – if you don’t count gaming. (AND-AGAIN-DON’T-FORGET-THE-TINY-FORM-FACTOR).

            And honestly, who would be gaming on such an HTPC rig….? It has been a BS argument from day one – you would always have a discrete GFX card if you want to game.Period.

            • NeelyCam
            • 10 years ago

            Much lower power consumption = lower noise. That’s why it’s a killer.
            This platform allows for a cheap and powerful HTPC in a mini-ITX form factor.

            Show me a 785+CPU in miniITX with same performance and power consumption and we’ll talk.

            • OneArmedScissor
            • 10 years ago

            Trouble is, you can do 785G and an Athlon II for near $100.

            Show me an Intel, well, ANYTHING, that does that without being crippled in some way. You won’t be able to have a Core i3/i5 setup going without at least $200 for the CPU and motherboard. The very few watts it could save will never possibly be able to make up for that.

            I don’t really see what this does for noise. I think that’s a bit of a stretch. It’s been pretty easy to make a dead silent Intel or AMD computer for quite a while.

            • NeelyCam
            • 10 years ago

            The trouble is making a dead silent one that’s also very very small.

            There are NO miniITX boards with 785G. The cheapest microATX I could find on Newegg is $69.99. AthlonII X2’s start at $58 (unless you want to buy one without a heatsink for $55), so your moboCPU combo is at least $130.

            Also, people seem to be bitching about gfx drivers and HDMI problems. I have to take their word for it; I haven’t used AMD for a while, but driver issues are the reason I quit so seems plausible to me…

            Don’t get me wrong – for a long time now AMD has had the best value HTPC platform, and I’ve thought about making the jump many times… It was always just a bit too big for my taste; had they had a MiniITX I would’ve pulled the trigger even if it was more expensive. The only MiniITX that came close to a real HTPC was Atom330 w/ Ion, but Atom sucks. Via doesn’t even count.

            With Clarkdale, I can finally have what I’ve always wanted: a MiniITX HTPC that can actually do something. And that’s why I call this a killer.

            If I was OK with MicroATX, then yes 785G+AthlonII would’ve been a killer.

            • OneArmedScissor
            • 10 years ago

            The mini ITX selection for AMD boards blows, but I imagine that AMD’s smaller market share and board manufacturers are to blame for that. There’s no way very many of those sell, as practical as they may actually be for general use computers. There’s supposed to be a J&W mini ITX 785G, but it will probably be expensive.

            There are some cases that are just barely big enough for micro ATX, which shouldn’t be too intrusive. I personally prefer that idea more to begin with, since your options for motherboards of any type are far less limited.

            • NeelyCam
            • 10 years ago

            I prefer “small is beautiful”

          • UberGerbil
          • 10 years ago

          It’s the usual story with new introductions from Intel: they come in at the top and filter downwards over time. Intel has no reason to price these cheaply when the Core 2s are still hanging around taking the fight to AMD. As those shuffle off their mortal coils, new Clarkdale variants will come in at the top and the current ones will move downmarket to fill in for the departing Core 2s. While moving the GPU onto the CPU package doesn’t create huge economies in itself, the 32nm CPUs will be cheaper for Intel than the Core 2s so they’ll eventually be able to push prices as low as they want. And there may be some reduced system costs for the OEMs simply because they can skimp even more on the PSU and the chipset heatsink with almost everything concentrated in the CPU socket.

        • shank15217
        • 10 years ago

        There are two reasons you might want to,

        1. You don’t need a quad core cpu.
        2. You dont want to buy cpu+motherboard on a dead end platform.

      • pragma
      • 10 years ago

      You’ll likely need GPU disabled anyway when pushing the bclk. It’s the same dilemma back again: a powerful quad versus faster dual core… Although these early clarkdales are somewhat disappointing with only 10% clock increase over 45nm parts (at same voltage). Where lynnfield does 3.2GHz at 1.25V, a clarkdale might go 4.8GHz at 1.5V, same thermal output.
      Regarding P55 compatibility: should be OK, maybe some BIOS issues.

        • MadManOriginal
        • 10 years ago

        Maybe, it depends upon how the clocks are controlled. If the CPU and GPU clocks are separately controlled, which seems like a distinct possibility since they are separate dies at this point, you would be able to clock the CPU however you want and keep the GPU at stock. Even once the GPU goes on-die they it be a separate independent clock domain, we can only hope since while Turboboost is nice it’s nicer to have high speeds at high loads too.

    • Contingency
    • 10 years ago

    If anyone else is curious, the difference between the 661 and 660 is that the 661 has a higher graphics clock (900 vs 733).

      • FuturePastNow
      • 10 years ago

      And a higher TDP, which is why they don’t charge more for it.

        • wira020
        • 10 years ago

        Could just be a typo… they could have just label it as overclocked gpu or something…

      • stmok
      • 10 years ago

      l[

        • NeelyCam
        • 10 years ago

        And the higher TDP, which “explains” the same price.

    • khands
    • 10 years ago

    When are these supposed to come out again? One of them might tide me over in the short-term while I get the cash to put the “gaming” part of my PC together.

      • OneArmedScissor
      • 10 years ago

      Early next year, but look at the prices. They’re about the same as more powerful quad-cores. You’d just be burning money by buying one of these and switching to something else, not saving anything.

        • wira020
        • 10 years ago

        #1 If you’re building a gaming rig, i suggest u consider other cpu first.. i3 n i5 got integrated gpu and priced considerably high for the intended segment (low end)… better wait for the reviews and see if it can game…. if not, i’m sure you can get a better cpu with a dedicated graphic card at better performance…

        Considering how the already available intel’s integrated graphic in their chipset performs, i’m not putting much hope in them… maybe there’s other use for them.. like HTPC…

        I think it was announced for release on Jan 3.. and Jan 5 for the laptop counterpart…

          • khands
          • 10 years ago

          I’m getting a mobo (that I won in the TR competition :D) that may/may not be compatible :p, but I don’t have the cash for a decent GPU/CPU right now and would like to get /[

            • MadManOriginal
            • 10 years ago

            You could always look for a used GPU, some older ones that are still suitable for gaming can be found cheap. (8800GT, 9800GT, 9600GT)

            • khands
            • 10 years ago

            It’ll be at 1080P, I’ll basically be using it to watch movies at most until I can afford a better CPU/GPU.

            • wira020
            • 10 years ago

            Words doesnt describe my envy right now… lols… gratz!

            I think these cpu will fit in P55 but then you wont get the gpu power because it doesnt have the connection for it… dont take my words for it… i’ve read a “theory” on that somewhere… i dont remember where…

            • khands
            • 10 years ago

            Thanks, and I hope the GPU works on these things with a P55 board, otherwise I’ll basically be stuck till summer of 2010 with an awesome Mobo I can’t use :'(

            • UberGerbil
            • 10 years ago

            Sticking a Clarkdale into any P55 board disables the on-chip GPU. There’s no way for it to output the video (no FDI on the motherboard) and there’s no video outputs (or related circuitry, like D/A for VGA) either. So if you buy a Clarkdale to put in your P55 board, you’re still also buying a discrete GPU card. If you stick with that P55 board, you’re signing up for a separate GPU: there’s no way around that. So you might as well get a proper Lynnfield quad core, and ignore the Clarkdale altogether.

            • khands
            • 10 years ago

            Crap, oh well, that answers that question. i5 750 it is then, I’ll just have to wait (hoping my return is half decent this year).

            • SomeOtherGeek
            • 10 years ago

            Hang in there. One day. In fact, while you are waiting, maybe you can “hang” the MB on the wall to admire you winnings! Again congrats!

            • khands
            • 10 years ago

            I’ll frame it above my TV :p

            • NeelyCam
            • 10 years ago

            HD 42+ inches? Also won from somewhere..?

            • NeelyCam
            • 10 years ago

            If you got a mobo, your game is over. Whatever CPU you can cram in it will have to do, and then you go out and get a 58xx GPU.

            Problem solved.

            • NeelyCam
            • 10 years ago

            If you’re on a severe budget:

            Is the mobo a P55? If so, wait until the clarkdales come out, so you can get an i3, and a used 4770. With these you’ll get you some decent gaming at an incredible price.

            If you don’t want to wait, i5-750 and 5750 is the way to go.

            • NeelyCam
            • 10 years ago

            If the mobo is x58, I would wait until Gulftown comes out, and grab a cheap used i7-920 from one of the 6-core upgrade fanatics.

            Honestly, if you’re reading these boards, you probably already have a decent computer

          • MadManOriginal
          • 10 years ago

          I’m thinking these price conversions are a little higher than what we’ll see as MSRPs and street prices. I also swear there was a CPU ~$90, maybe it was 2c/2t though.

            • smilingcrow
            • 10 years ago

            “I also swear there was a CPU ~$90, maybe it was 2c/2t though.”

            Isn’t that the Pentium branded version? Sounds right up my street. 🙂

          • d0g_p00p
          • 10 years ago

          Intel GPU and gaming? LOL. I cannot even get Torchlight to run smooth on a Intel integrated GPU.

            • khands
            • 10 years ago

            Which is why I’d be using it basically for movies/hulu only until I could upgrade, but it doesn’t look like that option is really available for me.

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