Office 2010 pricing and editions announced

On the Office 2010 Engineering blog this morning, Microsoft revealed how it intends to price the various editions of its next office productivity suite. Office 2010 will ship in four flavors, with price tags ranging from $119 for a key card purchase of the Home and Student edition to $499 for a full, retail-boxed copy of Office 2010 Professional.

Here’s how it all breaks down:

Edition Contents Boxed price Key card price
Home and Student Word, Excel, PowerPoint, OneNote $149 $119
Home and Business Word, Excel, PowerPoint, OneNote, Outlook $279 $199
Professional Word, Excel, PowerPoint, OneNote, Outlook, Publisher, Access $499 $349
Professional Academic Word, Excel, PowerPoint, OneNote, Outlook, Publisher, Access $99 N/A

The prices in the rightmost column apply to those Office Product Key Cards we told you about last October. Key cards will be available in retail stores, and they’ll include license keys to unlock trials of the three non-academic Office 2010 editions. In this latest blog post, Microsoft says boxed copies of the Home and Business, Professional, and Professional Academic editions will be usable on two PCs, but key cards will only be valid "for a single installation of the product."

Folks eager to try Office 2010 right now can of course sign up for the public beta, which kicked off in November. Microsoft says the beta is "generating record interest and use" with more than two million downloads already. The company also boasts, "9 out of 10 beta users feel that the Office 2010 beta is an improvement over their current productivity suite."

Comments closed
    • provoko
    • 13 years ago

    OneNote is awesome!

    • Farting Bob
    • 13 years ago

    Home and business version is licenced for commercial use as well, while the H’n’S version is not. So if you run a small or medium business and decide you need office 2010, you have to go for home and business (or pro) because MS takes piracy and unlicenced usage very seriously in the business sector. It really doesnt care about us home users in comparison.
    So your not just getting Outlook for an extra $130, your getting a promise from MS that they wont send the carnivorous lawyers on you.

    • Arag0n
    • 13 years ago

    really i cant belive they can upgrade as much the price just to get outlook….

    Really is a good program for business to schedule the time and over but really…. 80-130$? Are you kidding me? I would say that Word, Excel, PowerPoint all together are tie to tie!

    I really can’t belive it….sure i can’t…

    • stmok
    • 13 years ago

    Well, MS’s strategy has worked on *[

    • stmok
    • 13 years ago

    *[

    • ludi
    • 13 years ago

    My bad, I was typing from memory. Just got home and checked my retail box, and it says three installs right there on the back.

    • seawolf1118
    • 13 years ago

    Agreed. That’s been happening for, I think, last few office releases and a reason why I have switched to Mozilla Thunderbird.

    • sreams
    • 13 years ago

    And the price basically doubles just to add Outlook. Lame.

    • UberGerbil
    • 13 years ago

    Yeah, 2007 H&S is three installs. So no real change there (I’m betting you’ll find the $119 price on boxed copies at some point too). Meanwhile the two-install limit on the other versions is new AFAIK and represents a nice loosening of the noose.

    What was annoying about 2007 Pro was that OneNote wasn’t included. So if you wanted both OneNote and Outlook you had to go all the way up to the top version. (Or combine one of your H&S installs with Pro if you happened to have both lying around like I did). So they’ve fixed that too.

    • alsoRun
    • 13 years ago

    I have the academic version. I think it is for three machines, not five.

    • ludi
    • 13 years ago

    Good old Microsoft, tightening the noose further each time. 2007 Home & Student was $149 retail boxed, sometimes on sale for $119, and allowed for five installations.

    • Skrying
    • 13 years ago

    First, not every college student is able to get the academic versions of Office. Additionally “student” doesn’t only refer to college students. The only way you’re “thinking” makes any sense is if both of those statements were true in every case. Otherwise “Home and Student” covers the vast majority of users who will buy that version, it also covers what the license likely limits you to do with the software. I doubt you’re legally allowed to use the “Home and Student” version for profit such as a business.

    • ludi
    • 13 years ago

    Except that it does describe something. “Home and Student” isn’t licensed for any commercial-related use whatsoever. And if 2010 H&S is configured like Office 2007, then it will also be watermarked as “Non-commercial home use only” or similar while operating. Wouldn’t be surprised if it embeds an comment string to that effect in the document file as well, although I haven’t bothered to look.

    That’s your difference.

    • OneArmedScissor
    • 13 years ago

    Then why isn’t it called, “Home, Student, Elderly Relative, Spouse, and Your Buddy Who Needs to Print a Spreadsheet” edition?

    Come on, it’s intentionally misleading and describes absolutely nothing about the program.

    It’s just there so people think they’re getting a deal when Best Buy says they’ll pre-install the “student edition” on some kid’s new laptop.

    • GodsMadClown
    • 13 years ago

    Remember that there’ll also be a free, ad supported, Office Starter edition with simplified versions of Word and Excel. I’ve got the beta installed and I quite like it. It’s more than enough for my home needs. It’s more stable and faster than Open Office. I know I /[

    • OneArmedScissor
    • 13 years ago

    Oops, sorry, so he was. I misread the key card part.

    • PcItalian
    • 13 years ago

    That “Discount” also comes at the inability to install on a second computer… So yea, i do believe that.

    • emorgoch
    • 13 years ago

    Anyone else find it ridiculous that it’s a $30/$80/$150 discount to not get a DVD and case?

    • Corrado
    • 13 years ago

    Student as in primary and high school students. They don’t get discounted copies, but they still need to type up reports and what not.

    • Corrado
    • 13 years ago

    He’s talking about academic versions.

    • OneArmedScissor
    • 13 years ago

    But those random bundled license deals are the problem.

    They CAN sell it not only as cheap as $50 per copy, but even less, and they do…just not when they’re making a serious point of advertising.

    Their pricing games are a huge put off.

    • rodney_ws
    • 13 years ago

    Tiered pricing exists because Microsoft has big business by the balls… but home users are free to install the software of their choosing. At work the cost of switching to a new application suite (training, compatibility issues, etc) would be enough to make most businesses think twice… the switching costs are just too high. At home? Go to Add/Remove Programs and a few minutes later you’re good to go. Any problems a home user has inevitably falls on the shoulders of their in-family go-to guy. Microsoft wants home users to stay on board… so they offer very generous prices… late in 2009 you could get THREE licenses for Office 2007 Home & Student for around $60… that’s not an unrealistic price to pay for that type of software… the more Microsoft does to keep it in the home, the more it’s doing (indirectly) to keep it in businesses.

    • OneArmedScissor
    • 13 years ago

    Eh…you don’t have to ever pay for it again, even if you get a cheapo discounted version, and they only make a new version every few years.

    But yes, this stuff is old and simple, so at this point, there’s plenty of free alternatives, not just Open Office, that are more than capable of what almost anyone needs for home use.

    • lilbuddhaman
    • 13 years ago

    I don’t use my particular office for “official corporate work” or what have you.. and Open Office does [nearly] everything that MS Office does, for free. What justification does the average home user have for buying something this costly? Every year ?

    • OneArmedScissor
    • 13 years ago

    The “student thing” is just the totally normal version. It’s literally called “Home and Student,” not one or the other.

    • OneArmedScissor
    • 13 years ago

    I love how they bother to call it “Home and *[

    • ImSpartacus
    • 13 years ago

    Is the student thing an actual boxed copy? I thought it’d be closer to a keycard version.

    When I got my edu Win7 Pro copy, it was just a product key and a download source.

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