Corsair preps four new solid-state drives

The solid-state drive market is booming lately, and Corsair is no small part of that phenomenon. We’ve gotten information from the firm about four upcoming 2.5″ Corsair SSDs, which are part of two different lineups called Reactor and Nova.

The two Reactor drives have capacities of 120GB and 60GB, top rated read speeds of 250MB/s, and maximum rated write speeds 170MB/s for the 120GB drive and 110MB/s for its lower-capacity sibling. Both drives also feature 300MB/s Serial ATA interfaces, mini-USB ports on the side, 128MB DDR2 caches, and two-year warranties. Corsair bills them as “the perfect balance of performance and value.”

What about members of the the Nova series? Those are fairly similar, with 128GB and 64GB capacities and two-year warranty coverage. Their maximum 215MB/s read speed doesn’t look quite as impressive, but they can purportedly achieve faster write speeds: up to 195MB/s for the 128GB drive and 130MB/s for the 64GB one. Corsair says Nova SSDs feature Indilinx Bigfoot storage controllers backed by 64MB of cache. No mini-USB ports here, though—only SATA.

You’ll find images of the two drive families in the image gallery below. We’re trying to get more details (including U.S. pricing) from Corsair. However, the folks at Fudzilla found some European listings, which suggest pricing of around €150-160 for both 60GB Reactor and 64GB Nova drives and around €300 for the 120-128GB offerings. We can usually get a decent idea of U.S. pricing by multiplying Euro prices by 1.2 and swapping the currency sign; that would give us $180-192 and $360, respectively.

Comments closed
    • HammerSandwich
    • 10 years ago

    “Bigfoot”???

    • anotherengineer
    • 10 years ago

    2 yr warranty, no thanks

    make it 7yrs like the psu’s you sell corsair and I will consider your SSD’s

    • northreign
    • 10 years ago

    Please keep your day job.

      • northreign
      • 10 years ago

      eh that didn’t work right.

        • NeelyCam
        • 10 years ago

        Reply fail?

          • XaiaX
          • 10 years ago

          There is an “edit” button.

            • NeelyCam
            • 10 years ago

            Can’t edit “Reply to:” field.

      • burntham77
      • 10 years ago

      Oh cruel irony!

    • TravelMug
    • 10 years ago

    €300 for the 120GB. Man, I’m kicking myself that I didn’t buy the 128GB Agility when it was £210 and the €/£ exchange rate put the two currencies almost at parity.

    • OneArmedScissor
    • 10 years ago

    Reply fail…

    • wira020
    • 10 years ago

    Maybe AMD should join the SSD market, maybe then we’d get dirt cheap ssd for the masses…

      • UberGerbil
      • 10 years ago

      I assume you’re kidding. AMD doesn’t have the money to invest in a leading-edge NAND venture even if they wanted to; in fact, they used to be in NAND but spun that business off in the form of Spansion (though they retained a minority interest). Part of the deal with Fujitsu (the majority investor in Spansion) was that AMD would no longer have anything to do with NAND.

      There are enough other competitors in the SSD space that if there was a way to deliver a decent-performing “dirt cheap” SSD today, someone would be doing it. As it is, prices are dropping about 50% per year, which is pretty remarkable. The “masses” just need to have a little patience.

        • Welch
        • 10 years ago

        You got it right Uber, I’m impressed to see the drives down that cheap already… a 128gig can be had for roughly 180-200.00 according to this….. thats less than 2 bucks a gig, getting into acceptable territory now. I’d bet that by the end of Q3 going into Q4 of 2010 we will have SSD that are 256gig running under $1 a gig or right on. Glad to see corsair is taking it serious though, if their SSD are anything like their RAM (Or PSUs even) then im excited, plus their warranties have kicked ass.

          • OneArmedScissor
          • 10 years ago

          Uh…that’s $200 for the 60GB drives, which is actually higher than lots of them. :p

        • Kulith
        • 10 years ago

        Why doesn’t somebody make a 256gb model and sell it for $50. They’d sell a gazillion of them. It can’t be worth that much in parts…. and the sheer volume of sales would cover whatever cost to produce it.

        Then again I don’t know squat about how the product development and marketing process works.

          • OneArmedScissor
          • 10 years ago

          Hardly anyone sells a $50 computer anything with the idea of making money. That’s the, “Someone get this off my hands because it’s taking up shelf space for something else!” price level lol.

          Think about it. They have the cost of materials, operating the equipment, paying employees, packaging, shipping, markup…

          It’s certainly possible IF they can sell a gazillion of them, but they can’t. To do that, they have to be what all of the OEMs are sticking in their computers. And you can bet they’re not interested in pushing something that makes the computer look worse to normal people than computers from 5 years ago.

          All anyone notices is the drive size, and that keeps blowing up on cheap HDDs, so that’s how things will stay, unfortunately.

          • Ushio01
          • 10 years ago

          A 256GB ssd would need 64 flash chips at 2 dollars a pop that’s $128 and a lot of NAND manufactures are in trouble because the chips are that cheap.

            • bimmerlovere39
            • 10 years ago

            I’d be ecstatic with 100GB for $125. Definitely worth it for a secondary (or perhaps even primary) laptop. 100GB for $250… not so much.

            Ah well, more waiting for me.

          • NeelyCam
          • 10 years ago

          *[<"Then again I don't know squat about how the product development and marketing process works."<]* Or process development or manufacturing or business in general...?

          • UberGerbil
          • 10 years ago

          I would hope that you enough about how the product development and marketing process works to understand that setting the price of a product below your cost is generally a bad strategy, and selling “a gazillion” just means you lose a lot of money. But I suspect you just don’t understand what the parts (and R&D) actually cost.

            • nexxcat
            • 10 years ago

            He just wants to spend $150 to make $50, and make it up in volume.

          • triton666
          • 10 years ago

          If you want a better understanding of why/how, give these a watch.

          §[<http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XDIBJyNnLOU<]§ §[<http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-LTXzYXaAuk<]§ §[<http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8×1-TeDxblU<]§

        • Sahrin
        • 10 years ago

        Wrong on all the details. Spansion was founded as FASL, AMD owned 60% Fujitsu owned 40%. Spansion makes NOR flash, not NAND. AMD didn’t make a non-compete with Fujitsu, they made a non-compete with Spansion. NOR flash isn’t a good solution for SSD’s and other sequential access devices because they don’t have the space efficiency to go along with seek times. NAND is slower than NOR for seek, but faster for sequential because data is addressed page at a time (as opposed to block at a time in NOR).

        NOR is used in BIOS chips and other applications, where random access is crucial but capacity isn’t as important. NAND is used where capacity and sequential reads are the most important (remember, we are talking about pages – so KB, not GB) – like Hard Drives and memory cards.

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