Asus preps upscale, ‘overclocked’ Radeon HD 5870

Sometimes, even high-end isn’t quite high-end enough when it comes to PC components. The folks at Chinese site Zol.com.cn have nabbed photos and information about an Asus Republic of Gamers Radeon HD 5870 graphics card, which reportedly features higher-than normal clock speeds and some neat features for overclockers and tweakers.

Where AMD clocks regular Radeon HD 5870 GPUs at 850MHz and outfits them with 1GB of 4.8Gbps GDDR5 memory, the Asus card will purportedly run at 900MHz with no less than 2GB of 4.9Gbps GDDR5. Increase voltage settings, and Zol.com.cn says you’ll be able to hit 1080MHz with the GPU and 5.2Gbps with the memory. Perhaps that’s why the card has two eight-pin PCI Express power connectors and, in the words of the Google translation, "Fujitsu military-level capacitance."

The photos also suggest this upscale Radeon will have specially exposed contacts for voltage monitoring using a multimeter, and Asus’ overclocking software will offer a way to save settings directly to the card, as well—no need to leave software running in the background. Should things go awry with overclocked settings, the card also includes a "Safe Mode" reset button on the I/O pane. That I/O pane only includes three ports, though: DVI, DisplayPort, and HDMI. (Regular 5870s have two DVI outputs.)

According to Zol.com.cn, the Asus Republic of Gamers Radeon HD 5870 should be "available immediately." We’re not seeing it on Asus’ ROG portal, but we have no doubt the card will command a meaty price premium over regular Radeon HD 5870s, which already cost around 400 bucks, when it reaches U.S. shores. (Thanks to Expreview for the link.)

Comments closed
    • internetsandman
    • 11 years ago

    I’d only get this card if there was a waterblock designed for it. Eventually, cards get to a point where air cooling just won’t suffice in a shroud that size, and I’m worried this is an example of such heat-output.

    • Thanato
    • 11 years ago

    It’s nice to have more options for PC gaming hardware. If only there where more games that pushed the limits of what PC’s can do today. The only real reason for getting these high end cards is for multi monitor support. other than that faster hardware is becoming less important, which is sad. Hmm buy games people don’t hack em, I guess that’s my point.

      • OneArmedScissor
      • 11 years ago

      I’d complain about the quality of games long before I made my way down the list to the graphics.

        • Thanato
        • 11 years ago

        What about the lack of them for the PC….. that means there’s just less of a reason to upgrade.

          • Thanato
          • 11 years ago

          Console ports to PC games for a system that has 2 5970’s on a overclocked watercooled system…. is just overkill even for an enthusiast.

      • zimpdagreene
      • 11 years ago

      Yes I agree need for more quality games that really pushes video cards to the max and show it on the screen also. Don’t need games that look OK and are coded bad.

    • ltcommander.data
    • 11 years ago

    §[<http://www.sapphiretech.com/presentation/product/?psn=000101&pid=293<]§ I'm guessing Sapphire's VAPOR-X HD5870 is slightly faster. It's only overclocked to 870MHz for the GPU core vs. 900MHz for the ASUS, but the memory is at 5GHz vs. 4.9 GHz for the ASUS. I'm guessing memory bandwidth is the greater performance limiter for the HD5870 than core clock.

      • mczak
      • 11 years ago

      While I’d agree that memory clock potentially makes more difference, the difference is tiny there. The Radeon has a 2% memory overclock, the Sapphire has 4%. That’s not really going to make a measurable difference. Meanwhile, the Sapphire has a 2% core overclock, the Asus 6%. That’s not really going to make much of a difference neither.
      The asus one will probably overclock higher though, Sapphire seems to use reference layout, and it looks like asus is using custom layout to allow to run with higher voltages. Of course that will come with the sacrifice of power/noise/heat.

      • OneArmedScissor
      • 11 years ago

      How often do you really think the card has to move over 156.8GB/s of information so bad that it slows it down?

      If you turn the core clock up faster, though, any current game will likely run that much faster.

      It’s like fast dual-cores vs. slower quad-cores. Faster is faster when only a fraction of the potential processing power of either option is being used. Games right now don’t use 1,600 SPs and eat all of that bandwidth.

      But it’s a pointless argument, because, again, the card is already overpowered in almost any case. Turning it into a convection oven is just wasteful.

        • Anomymous Gerbil
        • 11 years ago

        Overpowered for b[

      • Xaser04
      • 11 years ago

      Based on my own observations with my Asus HD5870 VT I have found upping the memory clock has little or no performance difference at all. Upping the core clock however can give a near linear increase in FPS (percentage wise).

      (I used the Unique heaven DX11 benchmark with and without AA)

      I can’t remember the exact framerates, but my FPS increased ~7.5% with a ~9% core overclock. The FPS increased 0% (margin of error included) with a memory overclock from 4800mhz to 5000mhz.

    • wira020
    • 11 years ago

    I think it’s be a better idea to wait for cypress refresh… the card came too late..

      • pogsnet
      • 11 years ago
        • Anomymous Gerbil
        • 11 years ago

        And then you’ll just sayit’s better to wait until the next chip/card. Just buy whatever works for you, now.

    • juampa_valve_rde
    • 11 years ago

    but… it does run -[

      • internetsandman
      • 11 years ago

      no, that runs on Windows XP

    • adam1378
    • 11 years ago

    i love how companys finally started to put bling on the side of the fan shroud for the open side panel people. I never understood why it was upside down for so long. Who uses a BTX form factor anyways?

      • AlvinTheNerd
      • 11 years ago

      I have a lian li case that is atx standard but mounts the mobo ‘upside down’. But it also has the power supply in the front and a lot of other weird placements. All in all though, the computer looks better with the video card on top and processor on bottom.

    • TurtlePerson2
    • 11 years ago

    I like the translations:

    “fanatical hardware enthusiasts are preparing to hemorrhage Bar !”

    “1.5V core voltage HD5870 unleashed the destructive power of hell”

      • Kurotetsu
      • 11 years ago

      l[<"1.5V core voltage HD5870 unleashed the destructive power of hell"<]l This MUST be used in an advert of some sort. "ATI Graphics Cards; its HELL inside your computer!"

        • Welch
        • 11 years ago

        LMFAO……… Thats great 🙂

        “hemorrhage Bar”

        Ok I get the Hemorrhage bit….. but….. bar? What… LOL great stuff.

        “MEN!!!!!……… TONIGHT WE DINE WITH ATI (Its hell you know)

    • JustAnEngineer
    • 11 years ago

    I just don’t get a thrill out of these overclocked graphics cards, unless they cost close to the same price as the basic ones.

      • MadManOriginal
      • 11 years ago

      The special components and custom PCBs are interesting but that’s about it. Things change too fast for such premium graphics cards to make much sense outside of hardcore tweaker benchmarking xtremesystems types.

        • Welch
        • 11 years ago

        Ehhhh, this card is great and all but i’m sure the price premimum it will command over the stock 5870 won’t be worth it.. I do get satisfaction out of OCing video cards since its to me (a gamer) the most noticeable improvement I can make when OCing anything. However, I hear you JAE… whats the point of OCing it if its going to cost a hell of a lot more than the original, it loses its purpose of squeezing the dollar with your hardware when your paying more to start with.

        The save-able bios on this card make it more interesting than the custom PCB IMO.

          • JustAnEngineer
          • 11 years ago

          I bought the Radeon HD5850 model with 4% faster GPU and 13% faster memory, but I only paid 4% more than the stock model. I expect the goodies that Asus has added to this RoG card will add much more than 4% to the price.

            • Welch
            • 11 years ago

            I’d hope so too, but I’d venture to say that out of the box its probably not going to meet the price per performance with the extra cash you pay. You gained performance porportional with what you paid… 4% more cash got you 4% faster GPU and the 13% faster ram, which in the end is probably 4% more raw performance…?

            I think the price benefit is meant to come by further overclocking it, and knowing that you as a gamer have “The Best” as far as quality goes anyhow (voltage checkpoints, “Bios” reset, software less OCing, ect)

        • Voldenuit
        • 11 years ago

        Agreed. Also, ASUS likes to use custom BIOSes, which is anathema for people who like to edit and modify their BIOS.

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