TR’s Athlon Overclocking FAQ

We’re up to our knees in Athlons here at TR, and it’s time to start overclocking these puppies. Like the Celerons before them, certain Athlons are exquisitely overclockable, but it takes a bit of work to sort out exactly how to go about making it happen. That’s why we’ve put together our Athlon Overclocking FAQ. We covered the various methods of getting the Athlon’s clock speed above spec, their respective pros and cons, stability issues–the works.

Also, although this thing is, in true web tradition, a FAQ, we’ve tried to make it a good read in one sitting as well. Have a look, then mail us with your suggestions or with additional questions you’d like to see answered.

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    • Anonymous
    • 19 years ago

    *[

    • Anonymous
    • 19 years ago

    *[

    • Anonymous
    • 19 years ago

    *[Luv2Rav1@home.com

    PS this chip cost me $131.50 new.

    • Anonymous
    • 19 years ago

    *[

    • Anonymous
    • 19 years ago

    my amd thunderbird 800mhz cpu was damage. why it happen??
    my friend told me that the temperature was high. when i check on bios setup on hardwave monitor setup, the cpu temperature was 64c. sundenlly i change the cpu fan, than the temperature was discrease into 44c. can you give some advise for me about it…

    • Anonymous
    • 21 years ago

    *[Anon@spaceproxy.com<]* AMD-K7550MTR51B b[

    • Anonymous
    • 21 years ago

    *[Anon@regnsk01d05050160.sk.sympatico.ca<]* So if all 500Mhz Athlons are being stamped at 650 are any of the 550, 600, 650\'s being stamped at anything higher? Or am i just wasting my hard earned cash and time getting anything faster than a 500. Also what\'s the deal with the .18 micron Athlon\'s are they shipping? I noticed the very first comment questioned this but no one\'s gotten around to answering it. thanks.

    • Anonymous
    • 21 years ago

    *[Anon@ppp-149.tnt03.ffm.nikoma.de<]* On AMD\'s website is mentioned that all athlons are manufactored in b[<0.18 micron process<]b since the end of november. These Athlons should need less cooling and it should be safer to OC them. Some Questions: Is it possible to b[

    • Anonymous
    • 21 years ago

    *[Anon@209.42.150.240<]* If you go to the Trinity Mico webpage they have done a new verion of the dip switch method that allows you to use the Athlon with the case on or off. It\'s up to you. The switches are mounted on the back of the processor and all of the wires are inside the processor cartridge as far as I can tell. I still think this method gives you full control of the cache multiplier setting, but I\'m not 100% sure as I just looked at it briefly. Just thought I\'d point that out. LinearX

    • Anonymous
    • 21 years ago

    *[http://www.fullon3d.com<]§ §[<http://www.biznizzy.com<]§

    • nerd
    • 21 years ago

    Good FAQ.

    On the issue of BIOS control of the L2 multiplier, I suspect Dr. Pabst may have been glossing
    over this one evident limitation of Golden Fingers control with the assertion that the BIOS automatically
    resets the multiplier above 750 MHz. Considering that the multiplier is set on the PCB by resistors, then the
    BIOS somehow has to be able to throw a switch which overrides these resistors. If it can do so with the
    cache multiplier, than the same might also be true for the CPU clock rate multpliers. In any case, if the
    BIOS can do it, then a program independent of the BIOS could also do it. I will give $1000 to anyone that
    can write a program to do this successfully. provided I am given rights to use the program. To be more
    explicit, this would be a TSR which permits one to command any L2 cache multiplier which can also be
    commanded by the PCB resistors. If this works, then on to internal clock rate multiplier control…

    As the FAQ points out, the Golden Fingers method should be a cheaper (as well as neater) control method
    than running wires to every control pad on the PCB. If software control of the cache multiplier is not possible,
    then the reasonable approach might be to combine Golden Finders with wired control of the cache multiplier
    for CPUs aimed at operation above 750 MHz.

    Trying to run 0.25 micron Athlons above 750 MHz involves increased cooling problems as well as less than
    linear performance gains due to slower L2 access and the marginal gains are probably not worth the trouble
    for most users interested in more than bragging rights.. In those cases where it definitely is worth the trouble,
    then the best way is probably to start with a 0.18 micron Athlon 750.

    nerd

    • Anonymous
    • 21 years ago

    *[

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