Gabe Newell speaks out against Ubisoft DRM

At the Game Developers Choice Awards last week, Valve’s Gabe Newell chimed in with his thoughts on DRM, and more specifically, Ubisoft’s unpopular new approach. Newell received this year’s Pioneer Award in part for his work on the Steam content delivery service, which itself is protected with DRM.

Steam’s DRM is less intrusive than the latest Ubisoft scheme, which requires that gamers have an active Internet connection even when playing Assasin’s Creed II‘s single-player campaign. Newell contends Valve’s "what have I done for my customers today?" attitude helps the company avoid some of the negatives associated with DRM. Steam games can be played in offline mode without an Internet connection, and over the years Valve has added numerous useful features to the service itself.

Newell’s comments were apparently cheered by an audience of game developers and other industry figures, suggesting that those responsible for creating games are also frustrated by overly restrictive DRM. And it’s not like Ubisoft’s approach has worked. A crack for Assassin’s Creed II is already out in the wild, and Ubisoft’s authentication servers have been attacked more than once, preventing some legitimate users from playing the game.

Comments closed
    • Pax-UX
    • 10 years ago

    The Assassin’s Creed II DRM is too exstream they should just drop support of the PC if they feel they need to go that far to make a profit.

    • ihira
    • 10 years ago

    haha the toppage picture says ‘ASSASS’

    • albundy
    • 10 years ago

    “A crack for Assassin’s Creed II is already out in the wild”

    glad to see ubi is protecting its customers! lmao!

    • l33t-g4m3r
    • 10 years ago

    This is the pot calling the kettle black.
    Gabe seems like he’s just marketing his drm to ubi.

    Now if Brad Wardell, or John Carmack said something, I would believe it.
    Not that there’s anything wrong with steam or Gabe, but there’s an obvious conflict of interest/ulterior motive here.

      • reever
      • 10 years ago

      “Gabe seems like he’s just marketing his drm to ubi.”

      I would rather have Gabe’s version more than anyone else’s

      “Now if Brad Wardell, or John Carmack said something, I would believe it.”

      Wow, that’s lame.

        • SHOES
        • 10 years ago

        “Now if Brad Wardell, or John Carmack said something, I would believe it.”

        Wait Carmack is still working?

          • l33t-g4m3r
          • 10 years ago

          Yes, and he has 3 lifetime achievements.
          §[<http://kotaku.com/5493067/john-carmack-has-three-lifetime-achievement-awards-no-early-ipad<]§ @ reever You seriously think Gabe has more credibility than Carmack? He's hyping steam, not being anti-drm. lol. Gabe's a scam artist, he gave us steam, and also episodic content. Less wait time, more value my butt. 60$ L4D2, and no EP3 yet. HAHAHAHA

            • Sahrin
            • 10 years ago

            L4D2 was $50. Oh, you bought it on console – the most DRM encumbered platform in existence. So wait, you’re willing to buy a console game that you can literally do *nothing* with but insert disc, but you’re not willing to buy a game on Steam (which allows you to backup and unlimited re-downloads) because Gabe Newell isn’t John Carmack?

            Carmack’s problem is that aside from the original Doom, he hasn’t created anything of value for the industry. Gabe has created HL, HL2, the Episodes (which were both better than HL2), Portal, L4D, and Steam – which has given a massive boost to the platform in the form of developer support.

            • l33t-g4m3r
            • 10 years ago

            Lol. No. I didn’t buy it at all. The point is that l4d2 is episodic content sold at full price. I don’t use consoles either.

            Carmack hasn’t done anything besides doom?
            Wow. totally ignoring quake1-3, and everything else.
            id’s games have been some of the best ever made, IMO.
            Not to mention lax drm(cd-keys), linux ports, and always using OpenGL.

            • Voldenuit
            • 10 years ago

            I have clocked more hours in L4D and L4D2 than in any other shooter. And that includes Quake 1/2/3 and the Unreal Tournament series.

    • Krogoth
    • 10 years ago

    Draconian DRMs and forcing DLC schemes down customer’s throats is the cancer that is killing PC gaming as we know it.

    I blame near-sighted MBA-types that are calling the shots at the major big publishers. It is a shame that they got the perfect scapegoat for their ills.

    Notice how the small-time indie developers who have no major big publisher connection use little or no DRM scheme to protect their “IP”?

    The entire thing is a big symptom of how broken our current copyright and patent system is and the desperate measures that are being taken to protect its hopelessly obsolete model.

    I call for a complete reformation, but that is never going to happen in our current climate. There are too many special interest groups that have too much at stake in the current system.

    This is the next big step that these groups are trying to pull off. §[<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anti-Counterfeiting_Trade_Agreement<]§ It is nothing more than thinly-veiled protectionism. The emerging global powers (India, China, Russia etc) don't carry the same respect for current copyright/patent system and they do not have any interest in being drag into it.

      • kamikaziechameleon
      • 10 years ago

      don’t forget that the wonderful thing we know as DLC was popularized on the idiot friendly consumerrific consoles. thanks to them game standards everywhere have shrunk.

        • Krogoth
        • 10 years ago

        Removal of LAN support for MP and dedicated server support is just first step in road for the big publishers to force their own MP services and implement their own DLCs scheme.

        They all want to copy the success of “XBL and PSN” without realizing that PC and Mac crowd are a different animal from console users.

        I honestly hope that big publisher’s “little” experiment ends up flopping and costing them millions. I suspect that they still blame piracy for the failure rather than a more passable reason like the market simply doesn’t want it.

      • Grape Flavor
      • 10 years ago

      “Notice how the small-time indie developers who have no major big publisher connection use little or no DRM scheme to protect their IP?”

      The also spend “little to no” money creating their game and thus need “little to no” sales to break even. The entire business model is different. If you say that’s the business model /[

        • Krogoth
        • 10 years ago

        Copyright and patent system when it was originally written in 18th century was meant to give IP creators a “limited” monopoly on their creation. It wasn’t a bad idea at heart, but eventually it was trampled over by certain groups.

        This came about around the early 20th century. They had certain pieces of IP that were about to become public domain. They forgot long and hard (*cough* Bribery *cough*) to extent the expiration period into bloody ages.

        These groups restructured their industry around the new laws and since then had tried to maintain the status quo. The emergence of information age and internet started to undermine the decaying model. The same groups are going back again and are trying to put the “genie back into the lamp” and pretend that it is early 20th century again.

        Rather then adapting the times and take advantage of new opportunities. They insist on their failing model. Piracy is definitely an issue, but it is actually a minor one at best. Nevertheless, it provides these groups the perfect scapegoat and remove any of their accountability when they fail for other reasons.

          • BooTs
          • 10 years ago

          The formula for calculating the copyright term for your lifetime is simply: the age of Mickey Mouse plus ten years.

          • MadManOriginal
          • 10 years ago

          The stuff about copyright aside, piracy on the PC is more than a ‘minor’ problem. All you have to do is compare sales:pirate ratios on the PC (easier to pirate) versus console (harder to pirate, more consequences too) to see this.

            • Krogoth
            • 10 years ago

            The tiny minority that make-up the hardcore pirates are typically people who wouldn’t buy the product anyway.

            The remainder of pirates are casuals who typically fall into four categories.

            They feel that release price is too much at first and get the game in question. They later get a legit copy when it turns out the game is worth the cost or wait until it gets a price cut or two.

            The second crowd is people who “burrow” copies from their buddy, but get their own copy when the game in question is worth it in their eyes or want MP support.

            The third crowd are people who get a legit copy, but cannot stand the bulid-in DRM schemes. They simply download the pirated, DRM-free version to play with.

            The last crowd are people who have little or no access to the game in question due to importing/regional issues. They usually try to pick-up a legit copy if it ever gets availability.

            Piracy has always been rampant, even in the good old golden days of PC gaming. The only difference from then is that big publishers have become like the other major media outlets.

    • Mondos
    • 10 years ago

    A crack!?!?

    *goes to check*

    • Vrock
    • 10 years ago

    Frankly, I’m amazed Gabe was able to find time to speak in between shoving cheeseburgers into his face.

    • Voo
    • 10 years ago

    Well about not being able to sell games you bought in steam. At least in the EU that falls under “Exhaustion” (or more exactly lack there of – disclaimer: I hope that’s the correct translation of the german term “Erschöpfung” in this case, but I’m not 100% sure), so that’s actually the legal variant and steam can’t do much about it if the publishers are against that (and I have a certain feeling they aren’t too fond of reselling games)

    If you want to sell your games you need a physical copy of them. So you either buy your games online and live with that or you accept the inconvenience of buying iRL. I personally prefer steam although I know I can’t sell my games..

    • Hurst
    • 10 years ago

    There is something seriously wrong when users of a pirated version get a better playing experience than those who legitimately purchased the game.

    I eagerly waited for the PC version of AC2,.. even paid $10 to pre-order the black edition. But after I learned about the DRM that will come with the game I wont buy it like that. I will wait until they remove it or I will just get a pirated copy. I dont like the idea of UBI keeping track of how and when I play my game much less being dependent on servers to remain online so I can play.

    Its much like COD MW2 and BF Bad Company 2. I miss lan mode and being able to host your own games to play with friends. Bad Company 2 had a very rocky start with servers being down, getting kicked immediately after logging in to servers and bad lag at times. This weekend was much better.. I actually got several hours of play time in. But it gets very frustrating not being able to play a game when the problem isnt on your end,.. but the result of their problems and the restrictions they designed into the game. I had a lot of fun playing Ghost Recon, Quake 2 and Unreal Tournament. You could play those how you wished,.. not like they are doing today.

    DRM will not stop people who have no intention of ever purchasing the game to being with. It only makes it more difficult for the people who actually do buy the games. And in some cases,.. will make someone seek out a pirated copy who actually would have bought the game. Thats been my experience.

    • AliceCooper
    • 10 years ago

    Another nice feature with Steam is no scratched/damageed/lost disks to bother about if your hard disk fails or you buy a new computer.

    Just log on and download again. Hopefully you’ve backed up your save games etc..

    • Philldoe
    • 10 years ago

    Yar Har Fiddle Dee Dee…

    §[<http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3AzpByR3MvI<]§

      • rastaman
      • 10 years ago

      Now that’s classy!

    • wiak
    • 10 years ago

    Steam is DRM but you are not tied to the freaking computer and has no intall limits, so basicly you can go to your brother and play your valve games at his computer regardless of how many times you have installed it,

    Steam also allows you to backup your games and go offline

    Steam is the best method of doing things

    • tejas84
    • 10 years ago

    Gabe showing that he actually still understands us PC gamers. An asset to PC gaming, he should be running the PC Gaming Alliance (PCGA).

    Ubisoft should do us all a favor and exit the PC gaming business. I am sure EA, THQ and Activision would love the extra sales!

    After much debating I will be picking up Left4Dead 2 for sure after this!

    Go Valve!

    • rechicero
    • 10 years ago

    There are 2 kinds of gamers:

    Those who will buy the game
    Those who won’t

    With DRM (including Steam DRM) they are transforming the first into the second.

      • FuturePastNow
      • 10 years ago

      There’s a third type- console gamers. The console can be seen as a sort of hardware DRM, as you need it to play the game.

        • Prion
        • 10 years ago

        In many cases that still doesn’t prevent software piracy. Modchips and exploits and flashcarts abound.

        • kLeos
        • 10 years ago

        consoles(xbox360 at least) are so easy to hack…. even local lan centers usually do the hacking to allow saving of games directly on the HDD and playing them off the HDD

          • Pettytheft
          • 10 years ago

          Yeah but then you get widespread bans of all the hacks that were “banproof”. Thus eliminated one of the best reasons to own a 360. Most of the online PC cheaters use pirated software.

        • kamikaziechameleon
        • 10 years ago

        try third world markets, PC is the only legit platform in those markets, forget consoles.

      • StashTheVampede
      • 10 years ago

      Steam is DRM, yup.

      Steam, for it’s DRM trade offs, has given many more people the ability to purchase games with ease. I’ve bought more PC games over the years just because I could with Steam. My brother is in the same boat: if he can’t buy the game via Steam, it’s not worth buying.

      As hated as DRM is, I find Steam the least intrusive for my day to day use.

        • glynor
        • 10 years ago

        I agree completely.

        All of the games are DRMed on disc anyway. At least with Steam you get some really nice benefits. Since I have multiple machines (3 at home, two laptops, and 5 different machines in different places at work), buying through Steam and being able to install easily anywhere I want is a no-brainer. It is even better now with Mac support coming (1 of those laptops and 3 of the machines at work are Macs).

        Plus, with the awesome Steam Cloud service (for games that it works with), you don’t even have to worry about toting around save game files on a USB stick.

        Pretty much 100% of my game purchases are on Steam now.

        • rechicero
        • 10 years ago

        Steam has a lot of great features, but it fails in the basics. Reliability. We all know the advantages of Steam, but let’s see the disadvantages.

        * Right now, in the TR forum you can see a thread about a stolen account. You can lose all your games because of a hacked account (at least for some time).

        * You cannot lend or give away games. As an example, I received Left4Dead from one of my clients. I tried it but I didn’t like it. Right now is a brick in my shelf (it was a physical copy). I cannot give it away to a friend. If it were an Ubi game, I’d probably be able to do that.

        * You need to call home to install the games. That doesn’t seem much of a problem, right? Wrong. Do you remember Ocean or US Gold? Acclaim? Origin? All of them were big players. Now they’re dead. And if Steam goes south, say goodbye to all your games.

        Steam has good features and a great marketing policy. But we should ask for more. Ask for what we had. DRM? OK. A product key. And nothing more.

          • StashTheVampede
          • 10 years ago

          “* Right now, in the TR forum you can see a thread about a stolen account. You can lose all your games because of a hacked account (at least for some time).” This is also a problem with XBL, PSN, WoW, your own bank, etc. If someone hacked any of your accounts, you’d lose access to them. With Steam, you could start in offline mode and still play games while your account situation is getting settled (can’t do that in WoW, your bank will limit what you could do in that situation as well).

          “* You cannot lend or give away games. As an example, I received Left4Dead from one of my clients. I tried it but I didn’t like it. Right now is a brick in my shelf (it was a physical copy). I cannot give it away to a friend. If it were an Ubi game, I’d probably be able to do that.” Steam allows you to gift a game to someone, but NOT from your own inventory (you own HL2, you give them yours and you no longer have it). I don’t know of any digital download system that does and I don’t think there will be many that support it. Going with physical media, you’d have more ability to lend/borrow to your friend, but there are install/activation restrictions (Bioshock and others) that limit this function.

          “* You need to call home to install the games. That doesn’t seem much of a problem, right? Wrong. Do you remember Ocean or US Gold? Acclaim? Origin? All of them were big players. Now they’re dead. And if Steam goes south, say goodbye to all your games.” This argument has been around since day one of Steam and it’s still FUD. It made more sense when Steam started, but look at the 30+ million subscribers already on Windows and the few thousand (maybe just hundreds) more that will happen on OSX. Steam also has the ability to play in off-line mode, Valve’s games are just fine with it, but ymmv on games from other developers.

          “Steam has good features and a great marketing policy. But we should ask for more. Ask for what we had. DRM? OK. A product key. And nothing more.” We have asked for more and Valve delivered. You’re asking for things no publisher would want to do (lend, borrow). Product keys are 99% useless — they are cracked in no time and that’s why developers have moved off of it.

            • rechicero
            • 10 years ago

            “Product keys are 99% useless — they are cracked in no time and that’s why developers have moved off of it.”

            From the Interview I linked before (this guy know what he’s doing):

            Shack: A lot of people think the solution is making games that are so connected with the online experience that everything is validated online, patched online, controlled through the internet. But what you’re talking about is an offline, almost traditional solution.

            Brad Wardell: Well I think [we need] a combination. You have to be able to protect your intellectual property. And I’m a big believer in activation. Our games, not all of our games, but Galactic Civilizations uses activation for downloads. Basically, our system has always traditionally been that you purchase a game, it has no copy protection, but if you want to update it you have to get it from us with your serial number, and we validate who it is.

            But if you’re not connected to the internet, if you’re in the service and you’re overseas, and I just want to play the freaking game single-player, I should be able to just play it and not have to worry about it. But if you want to get updates, obviously if you have interent access, all bets are off, it’s fine.

            As an example, if someone can update their game, they clearly have internet access, and at that point it’s perfectly valid to make sure they’re a customer.

            EDIT: from the same interview:

            “The answer is that you focus on people who buy your stuff, who will buy computer software. ”

          • kLeos
          • 10 years ago

          “Steam has a lot of great features, but it fails in the basics. Reliability. We all know the advantages of Steam, but let’s see the disadvantages.

          * Right now, in the TR forum you can see a thread about a stolen account. You can lose all your games because of a hacked account (at least for some time).”

          Well yeah if you get keylogged/trojaned or give your password away, you will lose your account. This is no different than having a bank account or an email account that gets hacked… You make no valid point… if you lose your account, it’s your fault, keep your PC clean and don’t give your password away.

          Also on another note, steam is pretty quick to restore stolen accounts, all they need is an original CD key(a picture of it ) that you used to activate your game or the credit card you used to purchase one of your games through steam. I got my account back in I think 1-2 days after I got keylogged.

          “* You cannot lend or give away games. As an example, I received Left4Dead from one of my clients. I tried it but I didn’t like it. Right now is a brick in my shelf (it was a physical copy). I cannot give it away to a friend. If it were an Ubi game, I’d probably be able to do that.”

          make multiple accounts and install individual games on each one if you want to run a gaming business off of steam…problem solved. Steam isn’t made so you can buy games and sell them for profit. This isn’t a business oriented platform. You have the option to try games if your friends give you trials. Try it and if you like it, buy it.

          Steam is probably one of the most advanced and useful gaming platforms ever. Once the internet infrastructure in the US is updated to a point where we can match our speeds with Sweden, things will drastically change.

          “* You need to call home to install the games. That doesn’t seem much of a problem, right? Wrong. Do you remember Ocean or US Gold? Acclaim? Origin? All of them were big players. Now they’re dead. And if Steam goes south, say goodbye to all your games.

          Steam has good features and a great marketing policy. But we should ask for more. Ask for what we had. DRM? OK. A product key. And nothing more. ”

          it’s 2010, the internet has evolved to the point where almost everything is digital… even the US postal service is going out of business because no one sends letters, and why should they? It is much more convenient to use online storage for information, not to mention much more environmentally suitable.

      • JustAnEngineer
      • 10 years ago

      Your second type of gamers are criminals. There are two kinds of criminals:

      Those who have been caught and sentenced.
      Those who haven’t yet.

        • dmjifn
        • 10 years ago

        As un-profound as his statement is, that “don’t buy it” group might include people who don’t play it rather than thieves. In which case, I think it’s a great form of voting with your dollars. Which is a concept only secondary to punching them in the junk.

        Otherwise, yeah. Criminals suck. Definitely need some junk-punching there.

        • rechicero
        • 10 years ago

        I was thinking more in people who won’t buy… and won’t play (or play in consoles).

        But Brad Wardell can explain that better than me:

        §[<http://www.shacknews.com/featuredarticle.x?id=994<]§

        • XaiaX
        • 10 years ago

        That’s nonsense.

        You’ve left out:

        “People who rent the game”
        “People who borrow the game from friends”
        “People who just play free games”

        Are you a publisher? Why do you see the world as “paying customers” and “criminals”?

        Just because we’re not giving a specific company money doesn’t mean we’re stealing from them. They have no right to make us purchase their releases.

          • Lans
          • 10 years ago

          Or people who received game as present. The present you get isn’t always what you wanted…

          In context of specific paid game, there is still a large population of people who simply don’t want to play the game so they have no reason to buy the game in the first place.

          A lot of people play games but you are lucky to have 10 million copies sold world wide per game title. So there is a whole lot more people who simply would have not bought or played or cared about your game. :-p

          • Buzzard44
          • 10 years ago

          He also left out people who play games that don’t have Ubisoft DRM. Just because I don’t play Assassin’s Creed 2 doesn’t mean I’m not a gamer or a criminal.

        • BobbinThreadbare
        • 10 years ago

        There are two types of laws:

        Just laws
        Unjust laws

      • NarwhaleAu
      • 10 years ago

      Wrong.

      If I get frustrated by a game’s DRM, I may purchase it and then use a cracked exe to play it – but the games that make it too difficult to play are FEW and far between.

      People may use DRM as an excuse to pirate games, but all it is is an excuse – they have no moral justification for not purchasing the game.

      • designerfx
      • 10 years ago

      lots of people are refusing to buy due to DRM. However, publishers are pushing it hard. How many other ways can you download a game relatively fast online?

      PS: I’m done with steam downloads after my last game having a capped download speed of around 2.7mb/s (and only for about 5 minutes hitting 2.7MB/s). Even that is 10% of my maximum speed, and yes this is what I have in my household and I was the only one using it during that time. What the friggin heck steam?

      screw steam. never again.

      The only thing steam has done right is show that the 4 packs at around $30 are more reasonable prices for gaming.

      Even though about $20 is more accurate.

        • Palek
        • 10 years ago

        q[

        • BobbinThreadbare
        • 10 years ago

        You know you can buy retail copies of steam games and have a disc?

      • XaiaX
      • 10 years ago

      Actually, Ubisoft’s DRM did exactly that. I went from buying their games to not buying their games.

      The 8 sales they may have picked up by having the most irritating DRM ever is going to be more than offset by the number of pissed internet nerds who had previously been buying their games but stopped.

      • statrekgeneral
      • 10 years ago

      I can say confidently that Steam singlehandedly caused me to start buying games after pirating them for all of high school

      • LovermanOwens
      • 10 years ago

      Stealing is wrong…you probably shouldn’t steal something that you don’t need to survive.

        • rechicero
        • 10 years ago

        I’m just sick of reading nonsense like this. I never said anything about pirating or robbing. I just said DRM makes people stop buying PC games.

        Some will buy games wihtout DRM
        Some will go to the console option
        Some will stop playing
        And others will pirate the games (and I don’t say that’s ok, it’s just a fact)

        But all of them will stop buying games with DRM.

        And if you have to crack your original game and think that’s acceptable… You have issues.

        The industry should focus in people who actually buy their products. The paying customers. Pirated products should be worse than original, never better.

          • Lans
          • 10 years ago

          Well, I am voting with my wallet and only buy and play DRM-free games. I have not encountered a game with DRM that I “MUST” play… although if I did encounter such a dilemma, I probably wait for a year or two just to spite publisher (message I want to send here is DRM-free games worth lot more to me than DRM-enabled games, I’ll pay $50+ vs. $20- if I “MUST” play but again that has been 0 instances so far so DRM = $0 from me).

          Yeah, I even stayed away from PS3 and bluray…

          I wished more gamers would join me in voting with our wallet…

          • Voldenuit
          • 10 years ago

          l[<#75, I'm just sick of reading nonsense like this. I never said anything about pirating or robbing. I just said DRM makes people stop buying PC games.<]l QFT. I have 30+ games in my Steam folder, but after getting burned with Bioshock 2's Securom and GFWL authentication, I got so sick of DRM in PC games that I haven't bought a single game since. So in a way, Valve lost more revenue by selling me BS2 on Steam and turning me off PC gaming than if they hadn't sold it to me. Of course, I'm sure I'm in the minority, but the problem is one which compounds itself over time.

    • rodney_ws
    • 10 years ago

    Perhaps Ubisoft should have just embraced Steam. I’m not sure what the costs are for that, but god… it couldn’t be any worse than the $h1t storm they stirred up by going about it the way they did. Here’s the only 5 star review for Ubisoft’s latest game Silent Hunter 5…

    §[<http://www.amazon.com/Silent-Hunter-Battle-Atlantic-Pc/product-reviews/B002PAIPQO/ref=cm_cr_pr_hist_5?ie=UTF8&showViewpoints=0&filterBy=addFiveStar<]§

    • wira020
    • 10 years ago

    Once they get their sales report, they’ll know if their tactic works..

      • OneArmedScissor
      • 10 years ago

      The game will sell less than they want it to, the DRM will be cracked, and they’ll blame piracy, anyways.

      Rinse, lather, and repeat. The real issue with piracy is that it gives any sort of media producer an “excuse” to not be held accountable for their own shortcomings.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 10 years ago

        Why would you rinse before lathering? If you kept repeating you’d wind up with a head full of shampoo. rinse, lather, rinse, lather…get out of the shower?

          • Nitrodist
          • 10 years ago

          I was about to consider the poster’s POV, but then you pointed out this blatant error.

          • OneArmedScissor
          • 10 years ago

          I could swear that “George Bush” said that on an episode of Late Night. I laughed. Gourd forbid I say something nonsensical on a site that’s populated primarily by nerds who want more imaginary pixels out of video games. SERIOUS BUSINESS!

    • Sargent Duck
    • 10 years ago

    When Steam first came out I hated the idea of it, but I’ve gradually warmed up to it over time.

    Yes, it’s DRM, but it’s un-restrictive, letting me play my games whenever and where ever I want. And it actually provides some useful features (such as being able to download the game and saving your configurations). It’s not perfect, but it’s the best there is right now.

      • burntham77
      • 10 years ago

      Steam is also great at solving the patching issue, because all the games are auto-patched as needed. No need to hunt patches down online.

      For non-steam games, GameShadow gets the job done too.

    • Clint Torres
    • 10 years ago

    I remember trying to install Prince of Persia or one the the Tom Clancy games that was bundled with a vid card and the installer would not proceed because it said I had “CD duplicating software” on my computer. Thank God I didn’t purchase the game outright or I would have been livid.

    After that incident, I’ve never been remotely interested in any Ubisoft product.

    • eternalmatt
    • 10 years ago

    I don’t see how Steam is protected by DRM at all. I’ve shared all my games with three friends computers in the past and they continue to play them.

      • OneArmedScissor
      • 10 years ago

      I’ve shared games, too, usually with people who wanted to try playing some game with me, but were not interested in actually buying it and ever really sitting down with it.

      The difference is that at least someone paid for it, rather than all of those people collectively getting it from the same torrent so they can get it to work.

      Steam is more convenient for people in that situation and it surely gets them a few sales that otherwise never would have happened.

      • khands
      • 10 years ago

      I don’t think two games in online mode on the same account can play at the same time, it’s pretty lax overall.

      • TurtlePerson2
      • 10 years ago

      How is that any different than swapping discs?

      • PerfectCr
      • 10 years ago

      So you shared your Steam username and password with others? Pretty sure this is not allowed by the Steam TOS not to mention it’s pretty dumb regardless.

        • TurtlePerson2
        • 10 years ago

        It’s dumb to do something like that over the Internet with people you don’t know, but when you have a friend that you would let borrow your car, it seems pretty trivial to lend them $200 worth of games.

        • dgz
        • 10 years ago

        Don’t you think Steam TOS suck then?

        As far as I know, there is no way you can have two machines running the same Steam account simultaneously. That’s a fact. Then why should Steam TOS forbid me landing my account to a friend? This is outrageous.

          • eternalmatt
          • 10 years ago

          I lend my account and password to my roommate and brother who are good friends. Its not like I post the info for everyone on the internet to use. And they can play at the same time as me, just as long as its in offline mode.

            • dgz
            • 10 years ago

            offline mode 😀

            get it?

            offline mode 🙂

            • eternalmatt
            • 10 years ago

            They’re playing a single player non-cloud suppored games in offline mode. Whats the difference?

        • kLeos
        • 10 years ago

        not dumb at all. What if you were playing at your friends house?
        and like I said in the previous post, steam doesn’t allow 2 people to play the same game at the same time from the same account, meaning only one person can play the game at a time.

      • NarwhaleAu
      • 10 years ago

      Tell your friends to have the decency to purchase the games they like.

      • kLeos
      • 10 years ago

      It actually is. Think about it. You can give your account to your friends and they can play, but you can’t play at the same time as them. So essentially it is one person playing the game at a given time. If your friends want to play the game with you, they will have to buy it.

    • Ihmemies
    • 10 years ago

    There are no fully working, hassle-free cracks for SH5 or AC2. There may be partially working excuses of cracks, but nothing real.

      • TheBob!
      • 10 years ago

      I keep hearing people on one side say the crack works and the other it’s not “complete” What exactly is wrong with the crack that it’s not complete? Not that I really care. There are plenty of games that don’t require me to jump through hoops to play. I am just tired of hearing back and forth with the same freaking sentences over and over again. So please SOMEONE enlighten me.

        • OneArmedScissor
        • 10 years ago

        Cracks are always that way.

        But if a person can create the DRM, a person can break it.

          • TheBob!
          • 10 years ago

          But what is it that is incomplete about the cracked version?

    • LovermanOwens
    • 10 years ago

    Ubisoft’s next DRM, all you need to do is email/fax them a copy of

    A picture of you,holding the game box/DL service receipt
    A photo ID
    A copy of your bank or credit card statement, with transaction in question
    A Receipt of where you got it from(if store bought)
    And last but not least a blood/DNA sample.

    I do feel for Ubisoft though…the issue of how to deal with people who steal your stuff is pretty rought. Maybe they should just forward all the IP info from people who stole their games to the cops(in general, not just this specific case)?

      • moop2000
      • 10 years ago

      How can you tell who stole the product, versus those who legitimately bought it but used a crack to bypass the DRM so they can play offline?

      • BoBzeBuilder
      • 10 years ago

      Right. And Mr. Cop is going to put aside his murder case and go after the 15 year old nerd who’s pirating games from his basement.

        • OneArmedScissor
        • 10 years ago

        You bet. He’ll probably even BOOM HEAD SHOT the little turd for not maxing out credit cards on games so they can spend money they were otherwise never going to spend. That’s what you get for being an anti-American, economical terrorist.

        • LovermanOwens
        • 10 years ago

        You know that cops don’t actually do much don’t you(in most areas outside of major cities)? If you think that their job are so dangerous and fast paced…you could get a cop from the boonies to handle all the paperwork/arrests. If anything it will be good for the communities that will rake in massive amounts in fines from the scum that steal their products. A win for everyone.

      • tejas84
      • 10 years ago

      this LOL

      But seriously they should have used Steamworks and be done with it. But they are French so they believe they can do it better than the Americans…

      Look how that turned out…

      • Fighterpilot
      • 10 years ago

      “Ubisoft’s next DRM, all you need to do is email/fax them a copy of

      A picture of you,holding the game box/DL service receipt
      A photo ID
      A copy of your bank or credit card statement, with transaction in question
      A Receipt of where you got it from(if store bought)
      And last but not least a blood/DNA sample.”

      They also wanted a stool sample,urine and semen samples…so you could just send them your underpants.

        • BoBzeBuilder
        • 10 years ago

        l[

          • LovermanOwens
          • 10 years ago

          I Lol’ed at this

      • LovermanOwens
      • 10 years ago

      rough…not rought….damn typo

    • PrincipalSkinner
    • 10 years ago

    No link to the crack? 😀

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