WD ships two-platter 750GB mobile hard drive

Last September, Western Digital announced that it had begun shipping the world’s highest-capacity 2.5″ mobile hard drive with a standard 9.5-mm thickness: the 640GB Scorpio Blue. Almost seven months later, WD has now repeated that same claim, this time in reference to its new 750GB Scorpio Blue.

The WD Scorpio Blue 750GB (a.k.a. WD7500BPVT) achieves its capacity using just two platters, each capable of packing up to 375GB of data. That works out to an extra 55GB per platter over the 320GB disks that make up the 640GB Scorpio Blue. Platter density aside, the new drive has a 5,400-RPM spindle speed, 300MB/s Serial ATA interface, 8MB cache, and 5.5-ms average seek time—nothing too out of the ordinary there.

According to WD, the 750GB Scorpio Blue should become available today from major online retailers. You can expect to shell out $149 for it, assuming vendors stick to the official suggested retail price. Warranty coverage, as for all Scorpio Blue drives, totals three years.

Comments closed
      • continuum
      • 10 years ago

      This should make 640GB 2-platter 2.5″ laptop drives more affordable in a few weeks, I hope… woohoo!

        • OneArmedScissor
        • 10 years ago

        They’re all $90-100 on Newegg now, whereas the WD one was something like $190 for the longest time.

      • just brew it!
      • 10 years ago

      WD has a 12.5 mm 1TB model as well.

        • willmore
        • 10 years ago

        Sounds like WD and Toshiba have a lot of similarities. Do they have a business relationship? I.E. did they codevelop this and just brand it differently? I haven’t followed who owns/sleeps with whom in the HD business since Maxtor became a part of Seagate.

          • grantmeaname
          • 10 years ago

          no, because WD’s products destroy Toshiba’s on the charts.

    • YeuEmMaiMai
    • 10 years ago

    Great now I can put one in my PS3…can’t wait until we get the 1TB version of that…..

      • NeelyCam
      • 10 years ago

      I wonder if this is too hot/power hungry for a PS3Slim… Would be good otherwise, though.

    • Lazier_Said
    • 10 years ago

    600 Gigabits per square inch.

    On a 3.5″ drive that would be 900GB per platter.

      • Asbestos
      • 10 years ago

      That would be great for 3.5″ drive capacity but your math is wrong.

      • Lazier_Said
      • 10 years ago

      I found a Seagate press release that stated their 500GB/ 3.5 platter 7200.12 had a density of 329 Gbit/inch.

      I found a Samsung press release that stated the 320GB/2.5 platter M7 had a desnity of 516 Gbit/inch.

      Where’d I go wrong?

        • MadManOriginal
        • 10 years ago

        pi*r^2 for area means the 2.5″ drives are a lot smaller in area (although this doesn’t account for the lost space at the center for the hub so it’s not exact):

        3.5″: pi*1.75^2= pi*3.0625 square inches

        versus

        2.5″: pi*1.25^2 = pi*1.5625 square inches

        The ratio for 3.5″:2.5″ area is 1.96, or the 2.5″ drives have almost half the area of 3.5″ drives.

        • Asbestos
        • 10 years ago

        You have to subtract out the hub area. But more importantly, current 3.5″ platters max out at 500GB. An 80% jump to 900GB is unheard of. Increases just don’t happen that fast. We’ll get there eventually but it will be a few more years.

          • Lazier_Said
          • 10 years ago

          I didn’t subtract any hub areas or do any geometry. I used the numbers from other press releases where they’d already done that for me.

          If a 320GB 2.5″ platter is 516Gbit/in^2, a 375GB platter will be (375/320)*516 = 604.7GBit/in^2.

          If a 500GB 3.5″ platter is 329Gbit/in^2, if it were built with the same density as this new Scorpio it would hold (604.7/329)*500 = 919GB.

    • Ojref
    • 10 years ago

    Gah! I’m getting sick of all the “new” 2.5 inch drives spinning at a measly 5400 RPM.

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This