Thermalright coolers head to GeForce GTX 400-series GPUs

With their considerable power consumption, Nvidia’s GeForce GTX 470 and 480 graphics cards seem like prime candidates for aftermarket coolers. Sure enough, TechConnect Magazine writes that Thermalright is already whipping up new mounting brackets so some of the firm’s existing coolers can strap onto the Nvidia’s new behemoths.

Thermaltake’s Spitfire, HR-03 GTX, and HR-03 GT coolers will all gain compatibility with the GF100 graphics cards. TechConnect says Thermaltake promises those brackets "soon," although it hasn’t set a firm release date just yet. (For what it’s worth, though, the site expects to see something on shelves "by the end of this month.")

With its 550 grams of aluminum and 120-mm fan mount, the Spitfire really seems to fit the bill as a potential contender for, say, the GeForce GTX 480. With any of the three candidates, though, Thermaltake notes that you’ll need to chuck in a voltage regulator module cooling kit—also coming soon. The company’s existing VRM coolers tend to have plenty of aluminum fins as well as emplacements for 80-mm fans.

The Spitfire in the flesh. Source: Thermalright.

Just make sure you set aside a generous budget for your aftermarket GF100 cooling needs. Right now, our price search engine lists the Thermalright Spitfire cooler for a hefty $69.99, and VRM coolers appear to retail for around 30 bucks.

Comments closed
    • no51
    • 10 years ago

    I still have my SLK947U all copper heatsink for my old Socket A athlon.
    The thing weighed almost a kilo. §[< http://www.failratio.net/images/computer/slkhand.jpg<]§ Edit: meant as a reply to #38

    • thermistor
    • 10 years ago

    One more reason to strongly consider the 5970…no need for all this nonsense.

    But I suppose this cooler is as niche as the GTX480 will be.

      • insulin_junkie72
      • 10 years ago

      As mentioned before in this thread, the target market for this is the quiet crowd, where the only good stock cooler is one that doesn’t come with a fan.

      They make these to fit the ATI 5xxx series, too, so you can use a big, slow fan rather than the smaller, unacceptably loud (to the target market) fan that comes with the cooler.

    • swaaye
    • 10 years ago

    The advantage to these isn’t really in lesser temps, IMO, but in much lower noise for the same temps. Sure you can make these coolers noisy and get dramatically superior cooling but that’s unnecessary usually unless you want to eek another 10 MHz from your overclock or something.

    The stock coolers tend to suck when they deal with a loaded down GPU. I really don’t like it when a video card turns into a hair drier when gaming. Thankfully some of the 3rd party stock coolers that show up are a lot better than the ATI/NV OEM coolers. Unfortunately for Fermi, we’re not at the point of better stock coolers yet and Thermalright wants to cash in on that.

    I have a 8800GTX, ~3 years old, with a Thermalright HR03 cooler setup that’s really nice aside from the size. I won’t be adding $55 to another video card in the future though. I’m done with crazy CPU coolers too frankly…. Stock works for me as long as it’s quiet and it can be these days.

    • ssidbroadcast
    • 10 years ago

    How do things like that even fit in the case?

      • SomeOtherGeek
      • 10 years ago

      My thoughts exactly! They go over other cards? They sure as hell can’t go towards the CPU. So, over other cards to heat them up? Add a fan on top cuz there is no room on the bottom for it and it is too tight for a case.

      Big time FAIL!

    • Meadows
    • 10 years ago

    And what is going to make sure RAM and other components stay cool too? A lot of these custom solutions have the user end up worse than before because the card is overheating/dying elsewhere. Remember the debut of the HD 4000 series?

      • wira020
      • 10 years ago

      I see what you’re trying to do there… ear plug is easily available… for the neighbours that is… the user can just use noiseproof ear/headphone..

        • yuriylsh
        • 10 years ago

        Seems like we covered everything – termal issues, noise, power supply. One thing is missing though – price. Do you have any ideas on this one?

      • grantmeaname
      • 10 years ago

      the heat output of the card is the same no matter what cooler is on it, because it’s determined by the GPU’s resistance.

        • reactorfuel
        • 10 years ago

        You can’t treat something as complex as a GPU as a resistive load. You’re right that the heat output is going to be roughly the same, but that’s because the power /[

    • WillBach
    • 10 years ago

    I don’t understand the need for a Voltage Regulator Module. Does it mean a cooler for the graphics card’s Voltage Regulator Module, or a VRM for the aftermarket graphics card cooler?

      • MadManOriginal
      • 10 years ago

      It cools the card’s VRMs of course. But I recall seeing one review, I think Techpowerup, that showed you can separate the stock heatsink in to two parts – the heatpipe+fins part for the GPU and the base that covers the memory and VRMs. So while I’m sure Thermalright would like you to think you ‘have to’ get the VRM cooler it’s probably not true.

    • flip-mode
    • 10 years ago

    Thermalright to the rescue, because Fermis is soooo thermalwrong. 😆

    So, lets see:

    $500 GTX 480
    $150 PSU (750 watt plus I guess)
    $70 GPU aftermarket cooler
    $30 VRM aftermarket cooler
    ———————————–
    $750 + voided warranty + 1-2 hours to install hardware?

    For 10% faster than a $400 5870.

      • geekl33tgamer
      • 10 years ago

      Slightly biased? Most users who would even consider entertaining a card like this probably have a PSU already up to the job. They will probably give the cooler a miss too, and live with the thermals.

      TBH, a card running at 100C under load does not bother me, and I suspect that I am not the only one?

        • wira020
        • 10 years ago

        So it is a niche market after all?

          • geekl33tgamer
          • 10 years ago

          The top end cards always have been? You never find them on the shelf in your PC store for the “average consumer” to buy. Enthuisasts seek them out thru e-tail…

            • shank15217
            • 10 years ago

            Top end only if you’re counting highest thermals and power consumption.

        • ClickClick5
        • 10 years ago

        If you are planning to upgrade within a few months, sure. I keep my fan speed on my 4870 at 40% (constant) and I don’t exceed 65c when doing heavy gaming. (This is also after repasting the hs) And I have had it since launch, no problems, no death.

        100c is to high for long time periods, even for a 40nm product!

        if(card==cool){
        String card = “Happy customer!”;
        }else{
        String card = “Replace”;
        }

        ^ not 100% correct syntax, but you get the point.

          • geekl33tgamer
          • 10 years ago

          I’ll eat my words if these things turn out un-reliable? My current GTS 250’s in SLI (Based on the older fab process used on the 8800GTX+) run very, very hot in a well vented case. They get close to 100C under load but have not let me down. It’s still within the chips thermal limits.

          I’m not recommending you shoehorn one of these into a SFF PC ( < M-ATX) unless is missing the entire side pannel, but for most who end up getting one (myself included when the price falls a bit), they will probably last years.

        • Xaser04
        • 10 years ago

        It does bother me when the thermal limit for the card is 105 degrees.

        There really isn’t much headroom.

    • CasbahBoy
    • 10 years ago

    TECHREPORT STOP TOYING WITH MY EMOTIONS POST THE REVIEW

    p.s. <3

    • riquee
    • 10 years ago

    Says Thermalright in the title and one more time, and Thermaltake everywhere else.

      • geekl33tgamer
      • 10 years ago

      I think you missed the joke…

        • riquee
        • 10 years ago

        Ever heard of the two companies Thermaltake and Thermalright? Different companies, NOT the same. No jokes to get.

          • geekl33tgamer
          • 10 years ago

          Oh…. *Goes to google*. Up until 2 secconds ago, I had only heard of ThermalTake (Case / Fan maker). My bad…

            • tay
            • 10 years ago

            Thermaltake is the shit one. Thermalright is the good one.

    • BoBzeBuilder
    • 10 years ago

    At $500, Fermi has excellent value, let’s spend another $70.00 to keep it within sane temperatures.

    I feel sorry for the turd who buys this.

      • wira020
      • 10 years ago

      I cant see a reason to feel sorry for prime1..

        • Meadows
        • 10 years ago

        He can’t even afford something like this.

        /[

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