OCZ whips up 4GB DDR3 modules, two-module 8GB kits

Memory chips keep getting denser and denser, so it follows that memory makers would get sick of fashioning kits out of the same old 2GB modules. Sure enough, OCZ has introduced a new 4GB DDR3 module, which it’s offering both as a standalone product and as part of an 8GB dual-channel kit.

The OCZ DDR3 PC3-10666 Gold Edition 4GB module and 8GB dual-channel kit are both rated for operation at 1,333MHz with timings of 9-9-9-20 and a voltage setting of 1.65V. OCZ claims to have designed these products for both AMD and Intel systems, although it also talks of optimization for Intel P55, H55, and H57 platforms. Perhaps that’s a reference to the voltage rating—Intel recommends no more than 1.65V to avoid damaging the memory controllers in its Nehalem-based CPUs.

Otherwise, OCZ dresses the modules in a “Gold Layered Z3 XTC Heatspreader” and covers them with a lifetime warranty. The company has yet to announce pricing, but for what it’s worth, existing OCZ Gold 4GB dual-channel kits start at $117 shipped. You can probably count on the firm charging more for even the lone 4GB module.

Comments closed
    • Farting Bob
    • 10 years ago

    Its cheaper to make 1x 4GB stick than 2x 2GB sticks, yet as with most transitions they both sell for very similar prices (2x1GB sold for the same as 1x2GB while both were still popular options).

    ATM thanks to my mobo not playing nice when i use both of my 2GB DDR2 sticks at the same time (and with prices doubling since i bought them, and im likely to upgrade to a DDR3 platform within the year i feel cheated buying more RAM) im currently on 2GB, and it does mean i have to pick and choose the programs i run simultaneously. a single 4GB stick or 2 of them would be very nice.

    • PrincipalSkinner
    • 10 years ago

    Who needs 8GB?

      • CasbahBoy
      • 10 years ago

      Who cares? Needs always expand to fill available capacity.

      • Meadows
      • 10 years ago

      A great amount of people.

        • SHOES
        • 10 years ago

        Those people should be using professional workstations for their work rather than mainstream desktop components.

          • djgandy
          • 10 years ago

          Really. Is there such a difference these days? Why do you need enterprise grade products for a workstation anyway? It’s not mission critical.

          • defacer
          • 10 years ago

          Is there a good reason I should pay lots more money to buy a “professional workstation” to use at home when high-quality consumer components cost less and have served me well for 10 years now?

            • kuraegomon
            • 10 years ago

            +1 on this. I guarantee you that for many independent consultants or small businesses, using properly chosen commodity hardware gives you better bang for your buck, while providing perfectly acceptable reliability.

            There are far too many knee-jerk responses along the lines of: “Well, if you’re going derive revenue from it, and you need this level of performance/capability, then THOU SHALT BUY ENTERPRISE HARDWARE”. Please. There do exist such things as shades of grey, and there also exist users for whom high-end consumer hardware may represent the best value for their revenue-generating platform.

            I’m not sure that this specific product meets those criteria for even a large portion of that minority, mind you – but I acknowledge the possibility.

          • stdRaichu
          • 10 years ago

          Bullshot. There’s no reason someone like a software engineer (lots of VMs) or a graphic artist (lots of high-res images) should need to spend 5x the amount on hardware. With “enterprise class” you pay for reliability and, as has been pointed out, if it’s not mission critical then it’s money that would have been better spent on more consumer level hardware.

          Heck, I run x264 renders (500-800MB each) in the background whilst I play games (pushing 2GB), so I’m already bumping into my 4GB ceiling all the time.

          Been waiting for 4GB modules to come down in price, but at the moment “enterprise” (ECC registered) 4GB modules are far cheaper than consumer non-ECC modules, so looks like I’ll be getting another 2x2GB.

      • xtalentx
      • 10 years ago

      Who needs more than 640k!?

        • shaq_mobile
        • 10 years ago

        bill gates certainly doesnt…

      • defacer
      • 10 years ago

      I ‘m typically making heavy duty use of my main home computer for work: Visual Studio + Firefox alone will easily go over 2GB. Add to that MySQL, Apache, a couple of BitTorrent clients and other processes that are typically running on the system and you will agree that 4GB is not comfortable enough.

      You don’t want your computer to feel less than snappy when developing. I believe that graphics designers using PhotoShop would easily need even more memory.

      • Deanjo
      • 10 years ago

      Anybody working with HD multimedia.

      • Krogoth
      • 10 years ago

      A minority that comprises of professional users and multimedia hobbyist.

        • pullmyfoot
        • 10 years ago

        I do a lot of photography as a hobby. When Im opening 9 or 10 RAW files at once in photoshop, my total system memory usage frequently goes over 5gb.

          • MadManOriginal
          • 10 years ago

          So? That puts you in the minority, even within enthusiast circles but especially within the broader market, which is all that Kroger said.

            • kuraegomon
            • 10 years ago

            I don’t think he said he _wasn’t_ in the minority. In fact, there’s nothing wrong with _being_ in the minority. Just because you don’t fit in with the other 95% of users doesn’t mean that your demographic isn’t a valid market.

            Sure, there are people who will buy this stuff for bragging rights – but there are just as many who will buy it because they have valid uses for it – and together both groups will still form a distinct minority. And that’s OK.

            I really don’t understand why so many people seem to get all wound up over every product release that _doesn’t_ serve 99% of the computing populace. There’s no law that requires _every_ new product to be an essential upgrade to _your_ desktop. Just chill, people.

            • MadManOriginal
            • 10 years ago

            So why did he reply to Krogoth? Replying with a counterexample implies that he does not agree with Krogoth’s assessment about being the minority. If he just wanted to talk about how he can use lots of memory he should have just made a new thread not posted a reply.

            • kuraegomon
            • 10 years ago

            Perhaps he was responding to the _implication_ that “minority”=”inconsequential or invalid” that he may have thought Krogoth was expressing.

            See how silly that is when I put it in print? Let’s just stick with what he _actually_ said, and not what subtext we think is appropriate to insert into his comment.

            On the same note, since you’re responding directly: I read a negative slant to your comment #24 – i.e. that there’s something intrinsically wrong with being in the minority. That informed the tone of my comment #25. If I’m wrong, please let me know, and I’ll certainly apologise for it.

      • StashTheVampede
      • 10 years ago

      What does it matter who “needs” it? At some point (by next xmas), it’ll be the same price point for OEMs as the 4gb laptops/desktops they sell today.

      Its simply going to get cheaper for the memory makers to shift to higher density dimms. While you may feel you don’t “need” it now, you’ll wonder why 2gb/4gb setups are more expensive than the 8gb.

      • oldDummy
      • 10 years ago

      Darn, I’m a hardware addict.

      Just installed 3 X 4GB GSkill into a X58 SFF.

      Runs well.

    • internetsandman
    • 10 years ago

    9-9-9-20 timings? holy crap, how can you get something like that? I thought cycle time was supposed to be roughly equal to the sum of the previous latencies?

    • alwayssts
    • 10 years ago

    Is this out yet?

    §[<http://www.elpida.com/en/news/2009/12-22.html<]§ No? Ok, wake me up then. KTHX. :-)

    • wira020
    • 10 years ago

    Hmm, will the denser memory be any better than less dense ones… just wondering since bigger capacity hdd platter usually are better…

      • OneArmedScissor
      • 10 years ago

      If it were truly denser because it were made on a newer manufacturing process, yes, that could be true.

      But that’s not a given for only 4GB, and judging by the 1.65v these require for completely normal speed, it’s definitely not the case.

    • Farting Bob
    • 10 years ago

    Gold platered heatsinks? Really? Wheres my cheap heatsinkless 4GB DIMMS? My DDR2 didnt need them, normal speed DDR3 sure doesnt.

      • indeego
      • 10 years ago

      Gold-colored TiN or other metal. You can guarantee they are using the cheapest metal they can without impacting -[

      • Amien
      • 10 years ago

      I can see them flying off the shelves in the middle east right now, i.e. they just look vulgar…

    • BoBzeBuilder
    • 10 years ago

    4GB modules have been available for a loooong time now. TR is stuck in a time wrap. I only want to see prices drop on those things, but right now 2GB sticks is where it’s at.

      • Meadows
      • 10 years ago

      Yeah, there are even a few DDR2 modules at 4 GiB.

      • indeego
      • 10 years ago

      mmmm time wrap. Hopefully covered in hot sauce and guacg{

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