ASRock teases six-core Phenom II unlocking

With all the premature appearances at online retailers, AMD’s upcoming six-core Phenom IIs are all but a secret now. ASRock thought this was as good a time as any to start pimping the core unlocking feature of its 890GX Extreme3 motherboard, which it says will allow "CPU cores upgrade from X4 to X6 of AMD’s upcoming PhenomII X4 960T processor [sic]."

AMD has yet even to announce the Phenom II X4 960T, of course, but the rumor mill tells us this CPU might be derived from the six-core Thuban design, with two of those cores disabled—either because of defects or to meet demand for cheaper parts. The Phenom II X4 960T is rumored to have a 3.3GHz base clock speed, 6MB of L3 cache, and Turbo Core functionality, which will increase clock speeds in lightly multithreaded scenarios.

According to ASRock, unlocking the 960T will be as simple as heading into the 890GX Extreme3’s BIOS and toggling the "UCC" option. This option purportedly calls upon a UCC chip—that’s short for "Unlock CPU Core," by the way—as well as a "specially tuned UCC . . . function in the BIOS." And the way ASRock sells it to readers, how could one resist?

How many cores do you desire? The answer must be "as many as possible". It seems a daydream for most users; however, ASRock brings magic to our fan again and makes your dreams come true!

See the two images below, taken from ASRock’s press release, for a demonstration of the UCC feature in action.

Naturally, the company notes that success in unlocking extra cores depends on the CPU actually being used. Trying to unlock a Phenom II X4 960T whose extra cores were switched off because of defects probably won’t help system stability.

Comments closed
    • Big-Mac
    • 9 years ago

    Applications are not ready for real multi-thread environment yet, unless you are a 3d modeler, video editor or doing scientific computing. Otherwise, you didn’t get any benefit from the addition cores.
    Work harder, developers!

      • UberGerbil
      • 9 years ago

      Yes, it’s the developers’ fault that their word processors and email programs can’t handle it when you type on eleven keyboards simultaneously. They need to work harder to enable that.

    • internetsandman
    • 9 years ago

    I’m not sure if I’m correct, but shouldn’t the system percieve the CPU as a Phenom II X4, if it’s being branded and sold as one? I know it’s really an X6, but I think AMD would change the identifiers on the part to match.

    • wira020
    • 9 years ago

    Sounds better than the 6core… i wont need 6 core for now… Hope my insurance money arrive in time for the 960t.. hehe…

    • sparkman
    • 10 years ago

    ASRock has a magic fan?

      • dpaus
      • 10 years ago

      No, because if they did, it would be magical, and revolutionary, and Apple owns the patent on that.

        • grantmeaname
        • 9 years ago

        *groan*

    • potatochobit
    • 10 years ago

    asrock has too many quality control issues I think.
    if they put this feature in a reliable, non-budget minded motherboard I might consider buying it.

      • hp9000
      • 9 years ago

      My 785G is still going strong.

    • not@home
    • 10 years ago

    I think this would be more useful if it allowed the user to select which cores to turn on. For example: if a 960T had one defective core and two cores were disabled, you could figure out which core is defective by unlocking one extra core at a time and running a stability test, then only enable the good core and leave the defective core turned off.

    I do not know if that would be possible but I would buy into it in a heartbeat if it was.

      • yuriylsh
      • 10 years ago

      It would be even better if AMD sells 6-core Phenoms for the price of 4-core, so you do not have to deal with unlocking at all 🙂

        • dpaus
        • 10 years ago

        Uh…. They are.

          • alwayssts
          • 9 years ago

          Yeah, no doubt. lol.

          2.8Ghz model is competing with the i5-750 and prolly $20 more.

          3.2ghz BE is competing with the 860 and 920/930 and prolly $20 more.

          Can’t really ask for more than that from them, I don’t think.

          I wonder what the 960T BE will be…Probably compete with the i3-540, for $20 more. 😛

          I’d have to hate on someone if they were complaining about being bothered to unlock a 4-core to a 6-core when the nearest price competition will likely be the i3-540 or the ridiculous dual-core i5’s.

    • hp9000
    • 10 years ago

    How is this different from ACC?

      • ew
      • 10 years ago

      s/A/U/

      • alwayssts
      • 9 years ago

      ACC doesn’t exist on the new (890) chipset. AMD removed it because of people crying over not getting their extra core(s), and shady system builders that sold lower-end processers as more expensive ones.

      At least, that’s the tag-line.

      • Meadows
      • 9 years ago

      ACC has next to nothing to do with cores.

        • MadManOriginal
        • 9 years ago

        Meadows has next to nothing to do with useful posts.

          • Meadows
          • 9 years ago

          It’s true though. Unlocking cores was always a “whoops, look, I just found out we can actually do this too” type of move by AMD, and every implementation from that point was *[

            • MadManOriginal
            • 9 years ago

            I’d say then that ACC was *intended* not to have to do anything with unlocking cores, however it certainly ended up that way and thus in practice definitely had something to do with cores.

            • OneArmedScissor
            • 9 years ago

            But was it /[

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