Bigfoot intros Killer 2100 network card

A year on from the release of its Killer Xeno Pro, Bigfoot Networks has struck again, unleashing a whole new Killer card aimed at the retail market.

Much like the still-available Xeno Pro, the new Killer 2100 has a 400MHz network processor, 128MB of DDR2 RAM, a PCI Express x1 interface, and that all-important Gigabit Ethernet port. Bigfoot has stuck to the same $129 suggested retail price, as well, and it still promises huge performance increases (not to mention lower pings) compared to integrated networking.

Unlike its predecessor, however, the Killer 2100 has a “sleek new race-inspired outer casing,” and Bigfoot talks of a “completely redesigned user interface.” You’ll find screenshots of the included software in the image gallery below. Among other features, the Killer Network Manager gives users feedback about the bandwidth usage of individual applications. From what we can tell, application prioritizing and throttling controls are also included.

Look for Killer 2100 cards from companies like Golden Arrow, Leadtek, TUL, and VisionTek at stores both offline and online “in the coming weeks.”

Comments closed
    • Trymor
    • 10 years ago

    Hmmf, Doh! etc…

    • Bensam123
    • 10 years ago

    How the fuck are they still selling these yet PPUs and physic acceleration which was the hotest stuff to ever hit the game industry is all but dead?

    • jackbomb
    • 10 years ago

    Next product from Bigfoot:

    Killer Mouse Cursor Processing Unit (MCPU).

    -Completely offloads cursor movement from main CPU to a dedicated 1.4GHz CULV processor with 2GB of DDR3 RAM!

    -Comes in Standard and Fatal1ty (1.73GHz) editions!

    -EMI shield with picture of a monster. A shielded MCPU gives you the most accurate pointer movement. And it even glows in the dark!

    -Comes with PS/2 and USB 3.0 ports. USB port can only be used for updating internal Linux OS. PS/2 mice only, please.

    • Ashbringer
    • 10 years ago

    How are they still in business?

    • ShadowEyez
    • 10 years ago

    $129 for a NIC? Could it at least be 10gig?

      • Shining Arcanine
      • 9 years ago

      10Gbps would certainly be futureproof. I do not think there is any consumer-grade hardware capable of it yet.

    • YeuEmMaiMai
    • 10 years ago

    no need when my 3com paralllel tasking 3 series card is still up to the task lol

    • SomeOtherGeek
    • 10 years ago

    Can I have the software without the NIC?

    • blitzy
    • 10 years ago

    at least this one looks better than that original one that looked like blades

    • steelcity_ballin
    • 10 years ago

    I’m going home to overclock my megahurtz and watercool my powersupply. After that I’ll buy a bigfoot.

    • StashTheVampede
    • 10 years ago

    Need perf stats on SLI vs. Crossfire vs. Hydra with these bad boys!

    • bcronce
    • 10 years ago

    I just use my Dell’s on-board NIC.
    Intel onboard with:
    IPv4 TCP/UDP Offload
    IPv6 TCP/UDP Offload

    946mbit/sec up or down and 1.5gbit up and down with ~7% cpu at 1.5gbit. It also supports DMA transfers so I can do 110MB/sec via Windows File Sharing and only ~2% CPU. iPerf claims I have a 0.001ms ping to my wife’s computer and may times claims 0.000ms.

    I’m not sure if a $100+ NIC can reduce my ping much lower than 1 microsecond. I think there are other bottlenecks that would affect my pings more. I already have a 15ms ping to BC2 servers in Chicago and I live ~450 miles away and about 10 hops.

    And all from a Dell that costed $1000 1.5 years ago.

      • Forge
      • 10 years ago

      1.5 Gigabit, huh? That’s pretty impressive on a 1 Gigabit NIC.

      What exactly did you mean?

        • bcronce
        • 10 years ago

        “946mbit/sec up or down and 1.5gbit up and down”

        gigabit is always full-duplex but I’ll use that terminology.

        half-duplex I get 946mbit
        full-duplex I get 1.5gbit

          • cygnus1
          • 10 years ago

          I don’t even know where to begin with your misunderstanding of the difference between half and full duplex.

            • bcronce
            • 10 years ago

            “I don’t even know where to begin with your misunderstanding of the difference between half and full duplex.”

            And I don’t know where to begin with your reading comprehension.

            ok.. for people who don’t understand “946mbit/sec up or down and 1.5gbit up and down”

            I get 946mbit/sec UPLOADING OR DOWNLOADING but not both at the same time.

            I get 1.5gbit/sec UPLOADING AND DOWNLOADING at the same time.

            obviously my my NIC can’t handle the full speed of gigabit at full-duplex.

            also, I stated “gigabit is always full-duplex but I’ll use that terminology.” I already said I was incorrectly using the terminology but I would use it since it was the shortest way to convey that I was doing a “half-duplex” or “full-duplex” transfer ie “Up or Down” vs “Up and Down”

            • kiwik
            • 10 years ago

            I’d like to have this HDD setup of yours that can transfer 1.5Gbps worth of stuff.

            • bcronce
            • 10 years ago

            The 1.5gb/s was done via iperf, it generates a stream of data from your CPU. The 110MB/sec via SMB is one way off the HD but only on large unfragmented files and the files have to be near the start of the HD.

            btw, 110MB/sec works out to 880mbit/sec but that doesn’t include encapsulation of the data in the ethernet frame or the SMB protocol, so it’s damn near full gigabit from the HD.

            • Trymor
            • 10 years ago

            l[

            • bcronce
            • 10 years ago

            I don’t think there is an acutal propper term for what I was trying convey, so I had to use a simular term. Not that I was being condescending, but I’m not much to make up new words, so I just slightly missused a related word. “Full/Half duplex” does actually apply to ALL forms of communication, it just doesn’t apply to your utilization of your bandwidth.

            I did use “best case” since we were talking about NIC performance. If you want to talk about the performance of a specific part of a system, you need to isolate it. Since the Killer NIC advertises to improving network/internet/gaming, the only place it has control of is at the network interface. I isolated my network performance and said that my network performance is far-far from any bottlenecks except in the rare case of an unfragmented large file at the begining of my HD.

            I actually have done large transferse of files over the network while playing games. I can get ~60-80MB/sec on most files in my system and not even tell while playing games until it comes time to load the next map. Since I know my NIC can and will transfer 110MB/sec as long as I can feed it, when I’m transfering anything less, that means it’s buffer is kept empty. If my NIC’s buffer is empty, that means the most amount of additional latency I can have is ~1 packet. Assume there is one packet from SMB for a file transfer currently in the buffer and my current game inserts a packet, the added latency would be the time it takes to send the SMB packet. At gigabit speeds, that’s about 1 microsecond or ~1/1000th of a milisecond.

            Since it only takes ~3% cpu to transfer 110MB/sec, it’s even less with 60-80MB/sec. I just don’t feel it in game.

            To sum it up, the killer NIC, in my case, would give sub microsecond reduced latency. Going from 15ms to 14.999999ms pings isn’t really worth $100+. I’m better off upgrading my internet connection or something. To put it in perspective, in one microsecond, the nerve impulse(~119meters/sec) from your brain to your hand would’ve traveled ~0.005 inches, not even past your brainstem. Heck, still in the same patch of brain cells.

            “Perspective is in the eye of the beholder.” My A.D.D. doesn’t help with my writing skills.. :*(

            • Trymor
            • 10 years ago

            Ok, I guess all I was trying to get at, is that most ppl who are supposed buy this, won’t know how to tweak their systems much, so its not fair to compare average gamers who buy the fastest plug-n-play everything to sysadmins, computer gurus, etc…

            Try

            • bcronce
            • 10 years ago

            Ahh, that is a very good point. Deep pockets + flashy stuff = easy money

            I completely agree with this point.

    • Farting Bob
    • 10 years ago

    Powering up the ROFLcopter!
    Having earned a rep for overpriced networking gear aimed at gamers who dont need it, their latest product is….Exactly the same as the old one, but with a different plastic shroud than before!
    Is this bigfoots way of telling us that even they cant think of any improvements that have any actual real world effects?
    I hope 2011 brings us the all new version, which might come with blue network ports and a choice of black or red PCB.

      • donkeycrock
      • 10 years ago

      actually, i believe they came out with this product to reduce cost to manufacture.
      The killer xeno pro had 2 usb ports and a in/out mic pass-through. which nobody liked or wanted, so they eliminated those things. Then the cleaned up the board, and presto.
      Cheaper to make, newer model.

    • Nikiaf
    • 10 years ago

    i dont understand the point of something like this. my computer is connected to the internet through a WIFI adapter (only wireless G), and everything works fast enough and my pings in games are quite low. So what would i need this thing for?

      • dpaus
      • 10 years ago

      You probably don’t. People who write client-server apps where the network is (or potentially is) a bottleneck will buy them by the case-load.

        • Bauxite
        • 10 years ago

        They will buy a proper server NIC instead, probably one with multiple ports or a faster interface than 1gbps.

        It will also likely be made by a real company (e.g. intel) and not a marketing engine of BS.

        • UberGerbil
        • 9 years ago

        From a long history of working on the design of client-server applications, I can tell you that for the vast majority of them, if your (reasonably modern) network hardware is the bottleneck you’re doing something wrong. And in the few cases where it is, as Bauxite says, you’re going to buy enterprise-grade equipment backed by a vendor who is focused on something other than the bling on the card.

    • OneArmedScissor
    • 10 years ago

    Where is the Killer X2 dual-controller card and ability to use a multi-card setup? Why can’t I overclock it?

    Some “enthusiast” part this is. I need at least 2.5 GHz of NIC processing speed so it syncs up with the speed of my RAM and eliminates the age old issues of recumbent electron dialysis and the need to keep re-applying the Elmer’s thermal paste to impede gluon leakage.

      • Meadows
      • 10 years ago

      By the time I read all that, my brain a splode

      • UberGerbil
      • 10 years ago

      g[

      • oken735
      • 10 years ago

      i colored myn purple and it goes twice as fast now =]
      but it got too hot so i poured some water on it, and it work more better now:)!!!!

        • shaq_mobile
        • 10 years ago

        you should try putting a Honda sticker and spoiler on that bad boy. then it would really fly.

          • stoydgen
          • 10 years ago

          “you should try putting a -[

            • OneArmedScissor
            • 10 years ago

            I put GTX 480 wings and an overvolted 400mm exhaust fan on mine and it went moar fastar than yours, but I don’t have any CPU-Z screen shots because it flew off into the thermosphere and created parallel gobal warming.

            • Trymor
            • 10 years ago

            You forgot the obligatory weed-whacker engine hooked up to a side panel sized fan attached to it…heh.

    • puppetworx
    • 10 years ago

    Bigfoot is quite an appropriate name considering how often any performance gains are seen when using their mythical devices.

    • sacremon
    • 10 years ago

    I have repeatedly told told these folks, once in person, that they should be looking at the desktop videoconferencing market. Their board selectively enhanced throughput for UDP, which is what is used for the vast majority of videoconferencing. They just sort of shrug and say that is a good idea, and that’s it.

    • Vasilyfav
    • 10 years ago

    And the winner for most useless piece of hardware in 2010 is….Bigfoot with Killer NIC.

    iPad comes in close 2nd.

    • pedro
    • 10 years ago

    Well, I guess at least it’s something to jam in one of those empty PCIe slots you’ve got on your board… I suppose.

    • Fighterpilot
    • 10 years ago

    Gotta give em props for hanging in there I suppose.
    This is what?
    3rd generation of the Killer?
    Maybe this time it works. :)The marginal gains of the previous models just weren’t worth the big bucks they wanted.You’d have to have all the toys already before getting round to this one.
    At $129 its still pretty niche I would think.

      • Meadows
      • 10 years ago

      Considering all the money some gamers already spend on their computers, a measly $129 for +1 fps and -2 ms latency is kind of a no-brainer to many, I guess, what with their $1000 videocard setups and 200 dollar 1000 Hz laser mice.

    • d0g_p00p
    • 10 years ago

    How are these guys still in business?

      • bdwilcox
      • 10 years ago

      Amazing, isn’t it?

      • Meadows
      • 10 years ago

      They must be doing something better than AGEIA.

        • d0g_p00p
        • 10 years ago

        Well AGEIA was bought out rather quickly and a much better success since it is used somewhat in some titles. But yeah…

          • BooTs
          • 10 years ago

          Maybe Bigfoot can sell/licence some of their tech to Sony/MS for PS4/Xbox1024.

          Consoles are lame enough to game with online, but maybe if they had less lag it wouldn’t be as embarassing. The netcode of many games is pretty weak too – particularly if they use the UT3 engines netcode as provided.

    • Jon
    • 10 years ago

    I’d like to see some benchmarks comparing all 3 Killer NIC’s against an Intel and a Realtek card. Would be interesting no? How about it TR?

      • d0g_p00p
      • 10 years ago

      +1 vote for this. maybe toss in a Intel server card with packet priority features.

      • Prestige Worldwide
      • 10 years ago

      +2. I would like to see the usefulness (or lack thereof?) of this card compared with various onboard and dedicated NIC’s.

        • BlackStar
        • 10 years ago

        -10 these guys probably live from gullible tech sites that buy their NICs for benchmarking.

          • Faiakes
          • 10 years ago

          +1 me, too.

          • Jon
          • 10 years ago

          Having a hard time understanding what you mean. Please clarify.

      • Steel
      • 10 years ago

      You could always read the review of the original card:
      §[< https://techreport.com/articles.x/13010<]§

    • Kurotetsu
    • 10 years ago

    Bought a $30 Intel NIC a month or so ago to replace the pair of garbage onboard Realtek NICs that refused to work correctly without constant driver reinstalls. I’m actually getting stable download and upload speeds and certain programs like Dropbox actually work now (I figured the network was to blame, turned out to be the crap onboard NICs). All the research I’ve done indicates that the Intel NIC is dead even with the $100+ Killer Xeno Pro in every way.

    tl;dr

    Don’t waste your money. Get an Intel NIC and call it a day if you need a discrete one.

    • Krogoth
    • 10 years ago

    Bigfoot still doesn’t get it. This is a mismarketed product.

    It will find more use among the networking and SMB crowd that want professional-level functionality in a NIC without having to pay enterprise grade prices.

    Your ISP and gaming server’s geographical location matter far more in latency then any NIC. CPU overhead for network transfers are a bloody joke, especially if you are using jumbo frames.

    It is a bloody disgrace to call this card a “gaming” NIC when any Crab-based solution would suffice.

      • AlvinTheNerd
      • 10 years ago

      As someone who works with a beowulf cluster and is in a situation where the cluster’s performance is partially defined by network latency and network speed, I can tell you that I wouldn’t buy it. The Intel cards are as good or better and they offer cards that have multiply ports per slot, which is extremely important since that will limit the scale of the cluster. Plus we would not put up with customer grade software management, which is all Bigfoot has.

      • Usacomp2k3
      • 10 years ago

      Hopefully most people aren’t dealing with the headache that is jumbo frames in a home environment.

        • Trymor
        • 10 years ago

        I bought cheap nics and a cheap Netgear switch that both *[

          • Krogoth
          • 10 years ago

          Yeah, jumbo frame support does require decent NICs and switches if you want to avoid headaches.

    • Kallstar
    • 10 years ago

    Not again!!! Dear god why won’t this company just disappear already?

      • conjurer
      • 10 years ago

      Someone realy falls for that…

    • KarateBob
    • 10 years ago

    From your writeup, the Killer 2100 sounds like the Xeno Pro with a new shroud and software. What’s the difference?

      • Trymor
      • 10 years ago

      A fart Bob, you should know that… 😉

      Try

    • bdwilcox
    • 10 years ago

    /[

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