iPads are now selling quicker than Macs, analyst says

Despite the somewhat mixed reception to its January 27 launch, Apple’s iPad appears to be doing better and better commercially. An analyst note quoted by AllThingsD’s Digital Daily blog says Apple is now selling over 200,000 iPads a week in the U.S.

RBC Capital Markets’ Mike Abramsky, who wrote the note, adds that iPads are now selling faster than Macs—and not much slower than iPhone 3GS handsets:

"Checks indicate that US iPad sales remain strong post-launch, driven by rising consumer visibility to iPad’s user experience, sustained PR/word-of-mouth marketing, 3G iPad launch, and broadening iPad apps/content," Abramsky wrote in a note to clients this morning. "We believe Apple is now selling >200k iPads/week, greater than US Macs (est. 110k Macs/week) and just below US iPhone 3GS first quart (246k/week)."

Digital Daily says strong iPad sales have led Abramsky to increase his outlook, too. The analyst now expects Apple to ship eight million iPads worldwide in 2010, up from his previous forecast of five million. Keep in mind the iPad will only become available internationally next week.

To put things in perspective, Apple’s latest earnings release said Mac sales totaled 2.94 million last quarter. Admittedly, though, pricing tends to dictate volume, and the iPad costs half as much as Apple’s cheapest full-featured computer, the $999 MacBook.

Comments closed
    • prashu
    • 12 years ago

    no flash, no go..

    • Tamale
    • 12 years ago

    to be fair, most people buying ipads don’t have netbooks, and vice versa, so despite their differences, the two seem to be in the same market.

    • derFunkenstein
    • 12 years ago

    Sooooo the Mac Mini isn’t full featured? What’s it missing, besides a screen, keyboard, and mouse? Or is that the point?

    • Corrado
    • 12 years ago

    Its the first truly consumer usable touch screen only information device that is affordable, works, has a fantastic library of apps and accessories, and that has the build quality and support network to support mass distribution and use.

    Just like the iPod was the first consumer usable MP3 player that was accessible, worked well, as well as had a fantastic and easy to use outlet to legally purchase music online.

    Just like the iPhone was the first consumer usable smartphone that successfully integrated an easy to use music and app store, proper touch screen controls, looked sleek, and worked without the need for constant reboots.

    Do you see the similarities? These are the first CONSUMER usable devices. Sure there’s been tablets before, but they weren’t easy to use. You had to spend hours getting used to how it worked. You don’t need that with the iPad. Just like there was blackberries and windows mobile and Palm smart phones, but Blackberries and Windows Mobile phones all had questionable OS stability. A lot of the newer blackberries I had would require a reboot every 2 days, and took 8-10(!) minutes to fully reboot. Also, the only way to truly reboot was to do a battery pull. Not convenient.

    They are the first devices that you can pick up and use without second thought.

    • blastdoor
    • 12 years ago

    Just read this and thought it relevant to my earlier post:

    §[<http://arstechnica.com/apple/news/2010/05/mac-lags-windows-in-gaming-performance-excels-at-stability.ars<]§ basically, some support for the observation that the mac is a more stable platform (presumably due to less configuration complexity).

    • blastdoor
    • 12 years ago

    It’s really interesting to see how big the disconnect can be between people who really like something and the people who just don’t get it at all. Another great example is the Wii. When the Wii came out, a lot of people who post in places like this dismissed it as just an overclocked gamecube with a novelty controller. And while anyone with two eyes has to acknowledge the success of the Wii, I suspect that many of those original skeptics still fundamentally don’t understand why it was (and is) so successful. It sounds to me like the same disconnect is happening with the iPad.

    I don’t really have any point beyond that I find that kind of fascinating from a “people watching” perspective.

    • thermistor
    • 12 years ago

    The difference between the big success of ipod and ipad is that the former was the first well-executed portable music player system with a transparent and facile download process. ipad is the first – what exactly? I’m still convinced its novelty will wear off and/or it will substantially impact other Apple segments. It still feels like that 2nd/3rd/4th computer or worse, just a novelty gadget to the well-heeled.

    In terms of its market niche, I still believe the netbook comparison is fair. In hindsight, Apple did NOT get on the Netbook bandwagon, simply because they were cooking up something for the ultraportable space.

    • Scrotos
    • 12 years ago

    Yo’ momma’s so fat, her gravity field can be used to duplicate Sir Arthur Eddington’s test of general relativity!

    • tay
    • 12 years ago

    This mirrors my experience recently. Except I still keep a windows and linux box around to play =).

    • poulpy
    • 12 years ago

    And those are half-successes, now think about Lisa, Newton and Pippin and you’ve hit some nasty failures there..
    Apple hasn’t always got the golden touch and users don’t just flock like sheep if the product is shite.

    • poulpy
    • 12 years ago

    Christ. Is it 2-screens-long-post day?!

    TLDNR -again- but I’m interested to know if you typed this from your iPad again and if so how long/painful was it?

    • blastdoor
    • 12 years ago

    I think your subconscious mind (I mean to say that with a thick german accent) is confounding 1990s Apple with current Apple (oh, and you hate your father). But seriously, I really think maybe that’s what’s going on. Here’s my history…

    First Mac was a Mac IIsi in 1991 when I was in high school (system 6.7, I believe). The Mac totally dominated PCs of that era in terms of UI and in terms of built-in graphics/sound capabilities. People who were anti-Mac back then weren’t pro-windows, they were pro-CLI. If you thought a mouse was a good idea, you had a Mac (or an Amiga).

    For the next 10 years, it was all downhill. By the time System 7.5 came out, Macs had serious stability issues and there was no coherent plan for the future. Even after Steve Jobs returned, it didn’t look very good to me.

    In 1999, I switched to the PC and never, ever thought I’d get a Mac again. I built a dual celeron system with Windows 2000 (I think it was a release candidate at that time). Windows 2000 had a lot that the Mac did not — pre-emptive multitasking, protected memory, and much, much better hardware options.

    2000-2005 — I was quite happy with my PC. I kept win2k because I saw no advantage to XP. OSX struck me as slow and half-baked. PowerPC was incredibly slow compared to AMD hardware. You would have had to be a hard core RDF person to own a Mac back then.

    2006 – now — the transition to Intel hardware was a big deal. It made it possible for people to buy a Mac with a built-in insurance policy of being able to completely revert to Windows if they didn’t like the Mac. My wife, who was growing bored with her PC, decided on a whim to try a MacBook. I thought she was a little nuts, but I didn’t give her a hard time about it. Instead, I downloaded the RC for Vista, thinking that would be everything that OSX was and more. Thing was, Vista crashed my computer everytime I inserted a USB flash drive. That kind of sucked. So I went trying to figure out the problem… most likely a driver issue with my motherboard, which was not acknowledged by the motherboard manufacturer.

    Suddenly the PC didn’t seem like this relatively stable platform. Instead, it started to feel like a giant mess. When I built that first system in 1999, I carefully followed the guidance of a friend to get parts that would be compatible with win2k at that time. But over the years, as I would upgrade different parts, the compatibility issues became more complex. And unlike in 1999, I now had a full time job and wife. Spending type d!cking around on my computer *just to keep it running* was far less interesting. Playing the latest games was also becoming far less interesting (everything was becoming derivative, just better graphics without more fun).

    So I see my wife who now has this computer that “just works” (mostly because of Apple’s more rigid control over the platform, but who cares why), and she’s able to spend her energies doing things that are fun and interesting while I’m spending my energies just keeping my home-built frankenstein from crashing.

    Now, at this point, I could have just bought a Dell or HP if I wanted to get out of the DIY world. But that struck me as a half-measure. I didn’t really believe that Dell or HP tech support would have been able to solve my Vista driver problem had it been on one of their computers — they would not have been interested in helping me upgrade the OS on an old computer, they would have wanted to sell me a new computer. And it turned out that Vista just wasn’t that impressive anyway.

    So, in late 2006, I bought a MacBook Pro, and in 2009 a Mac Pro. Today I use the MacBook Pro mostly to boot into XP to play the old games that I actually enjoyed (and don’t think that current games have really surpassed) while I use the Mac Pro for everything else (both work and personal).

    Why do I like the Mac? I like the UI and the platform is rock solid stable. And when I say that the platform is stable, I’m not just talking about “protected memory” or any specific computer science concept. I’m talking about the overall experience — the computer never has any downtime because there are no driver issues, no malware issues, and that lack of issues requires ZERO work from me. It just is. I don’t have to lift one finger to keep my computer stable and functioning.

    By the way, in terms of the UI, the two features that I really like are the system-wide zoom feature (I’m visually impaired, so I really use this a lot) and Spaces (I realize there are third-party ways to achieve both things in Windows, but once again one must deal with incompatibilities and troubleshooting). But I also just like the overall “look and feel”, which is of course more subjective. (oh, and I really like Time Machine — that has saved my bacon a couple of times, and once is enough to make it worthwhile)

    So to sum up — with a Mac, I have a computer that is just as fast as a PC (because of the Intel transition), I have a computer that is free of driver issues, malware, and is therefore trivially simple to maintain, I have a computer that makes me more productive, and I have a computer that can run all the software that I want to run (including my old Windows games). yes, it’s more expensive — but another big difference between me now and me in 1999 is that me now has a lot more money (econ PhD + job == $$), so frankly I just don’t care about the price difference — it’s trivial.

    Of course, this whole post was about the Mac, which doesn’t have so much to do with the iPad. But I really like my iPad too. I guess that’s another post.

    • Corrado
    • 12 years ago

    So overall, they’re nit doing too badly. If they can get 5-7 million out within the year, that’s a pretty sizable market. One that can’t really be ignored.

    • wesley96
    • 12 years ago

    I dunno… Apple TV flopped. Mac mini ain’t doing all that well.

    • can-a-tuna
    • 12 years ago

    Because its Apple product. Whatever Apple makes, people buy them.

    • BooTs
    • 12 years ago

    This just in! Analysts confirm: Turtles faster than Snails. Bigger too.

    • Palek
    • 12 years ago

    Here’s why I want one.

    I travel almost 90 minutes a day to work and back using public transportation. Currently I spend most of my commuting time staring at the teeny-tiny screen of my 5G iPod watching my favourite TV serials. I would love to have something with a bigger screen and the same overall ease of use as the iPod+iTunes combo.

    The iPad is a bit too expensive for my tastes, though, so I’ll probably settle for an iPod Touch when my iPod 5G finally kicks the bucket.

    • KoolAidMan
    • 12 years ago

    Laptops are too bulky in some situations and smartphones are too limited based on their display size. It isn’t rocket science why the iPad is appealing to certain people.

    • Ashbringer
    • 12 years ago

    Why do people have these? What happened to your laptops and smart phones? Why? Why? Why? God why?

    • Tamale
    • 12 years ago

    several people where I work have bought TWO ipads.. one for home for their entertainment controller and one for work to carry everywhere to do emailing and scheduling.

    i have to admit, the usability of the device makes it extremely handy for people constantly going around the office. my boss was getting well over two days of intensive usage before having to recharge. that’s pretty cool imo.

    • homerdog
    • 12 years ago

    TLDNR. But I read it anyway and it was good.

    • eitje
    • 12 years ago

    market plunges as analysts stop talking!

    • eitje
    • 12 years ago

    everything is always in your gravity field.

    • WaltC
    • 12 years ago

    I’m amazed at the interest in it, too…;) I still can’t figure out why anyone might want one!…?….;) I think there’s a consumer component to “buying an Apple product” that I can’t see because I am immune to the RDF. It’s like paying membership into some sort of strange club, or something, wherein everyone talks in the “secret language,” or something.

    I can’t figure it! I know you’ve descended into the Apple pit and lived to tell about it, so I thought I’d ask you. In all seriousness, there must be something about my psychological makeup that makes me immune to Apple mania–I worked for a major Apple VAR in my area for well over a year back in the 90’s, and I tried to talk myself into buying a Mac at the decent discount they’d have given me–and I just couldn’t! I’ve owned at least one of just about everything else, including Amigas, but when it came to actually buying a Mac I just could not persuade myself to drop a dime on any of them.

    It might have had something to do with working with PowerMacs every day–and watching them crash regularly in Photoshop–or it might have had something to do with the stacks from floor to ceiling in our tech support dept. that consisted of various Macs awaiting repair for various conditions–the most common of which was “Help! My Mac won’t boot anymore! Help!”–which was often solved by simply reinstalling the Mac OS. Seems like a simple fix, but for those people who brought in their machines for our tech to take care of, reinstalling the Mac OS seemed a task of Herculean intellectual proportion, on the order of becoming fluent in Chinese after being born and bred in Kansas!…:)

    I just don’t understand my complete disinterest in Apple hardware. I have a suspicion, though, that my disdain may be along the lines of why I eventually grew to dislike even my Amigas–and that was the custom, proprietary environment of the Amiga–what was a blast at first during the Amiga’s heyday turned out to be very unpleasant as I watched Amiga software and hardware dwindle in availability. I vowed at that time that I’d never let a computer maker put me in that position again. Yea, come to think of it, that’s probably it. The fate of the Amiga forever soured me on proprietary computers–there’s no future in them.

    Oh, I know that unlike C=, Apple isn’t going belly up any time soon. But with Apple’s insistence on throwaway hardware designs and planned obsolescence for most of its products, not to mention the closed and proprietary software trends, it’s pretty much the same in the end. I’ve come to enjoy building my own boxes to my own specs and with my own choice of peripherals inside, and it’s always thrilling whenever I do a major upgrade to my hardware–and all without having to build or buy a brand new box just to do it. Nope, I can’t see my way back to proprietary schemes.

    Thanks for listening…;) I guess this was a successful bit of self-therapy, eh?…;)

    • provoko
    • 12 years ago

    so many shiny toys being sold
    well at least people can use them as dinner plates after they get bored with them

    • WaltC
    • 12 years ago

    The iPad is a touch-screen tablet device–it’s not a netbook. Yet, I constantly see people comparing it to netbooks in general. I think a netbook, or better yet an ultraportable, just blows the iPad away in terms of features for the money.

    I think once the production run for the traditional I-buy-everything-Apple-makes consumers has run its course, I would expect to see a serious drop in iPad demand. But maybe not…;) I was sure wrong about the iPod–didn’t think there’d be much of market for that, either. Ah, well, we shall see…

    • OneArmedScissor
    • 12 years ago

    Analysts are now running out of useful things to talk about quicker than Macolytes, OAS says.

    • Squeazle
    • 12 years ago

    Why is this news? Any unsaturated market will outsell one that’s been around for a while and doing steady business.

    • blastdoor
    • 12 years ago

    I think I read that between 50 and 60 million net books are sold per year (total across all vendors). So apple is selling about 12 million a year, which is about 20-25% of total net book sales, which seems like about what you’d expect hp’s share to be. And of course apple gets higher margins.

    • blastdoor
    • 12 years ago

    I’m typing this from my iPad right now. I’ve been amazed to see the interest in this device and the number of other people I’ve encountered who are buying them, including people who don’t own macs.

    • Corrado
    • 12 years ago

    How many netbooks does Dell sell a month? HP? Thats the real comparison. Saying that they are comparable is like saying that if Tesla sold a million roadsters a month, they’re not doing very well because all the other carmakers combined sold 30 million of something that is sort of the same, but still in a completely different market segment.

    • sschaem
    • 12 years ago

    no wonder Apple stock is going down like a flaming rocket, they are only selling 200 hundred ipad a week!
    wait…
    200 *thousand* ??? Almost 1 million unit a month ! holly canoly !

    Told you guy, tell your secret santa “No ipad” , because if you want one or not, your getting one for Xmas! 🙂

    BTW, I have no idea why Apple does so well, I dont own any of their products. (I had an ipod as a gift once, forgot to tell the secret santa no ipod, so I ended up giving it away.. or I think I lost it.. well lets just say its not in my gravity field anymore)

    • indeego
    • 12 years ago

    ~1 million a month for ipads and ~30x that for PC’s. Apple has a long way to gog{

    • njenabnit
    • 12 years ago

    I don’t think it’s just the “iSheep” or Apple faithful. Much like the iPhone, this is a general consumer app that is simple to use and arguablya cheap route to get into an Apple “computer” for those non-mac-heads who like the iPhone but didn’t want to spend a full G on a macbook.

    • KarateBob
    • 12 years ago

    Yep. iSheep wil+l buy a new iSomething every year, no matter how ridiculous.

    But 200,000 units a week is impressive.

    • flip-mode
    • 12 years ago

    Not surprising. All the Apple faithful already have Macs and iPhones.

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