New Folding@Home GPU client is tuned for Fermi

Folders, take note. Stanford University has released a beta Folding@Home GPU client specially tuned for Nvidia’s Fermi architecture, which should be good news to anyone who’s laid down the cash for a GeForce GTX 470 or 480 graphics card.

Stanford’s Vijay Pande says the third-generation GPU core in this client uses the OpenMM molecular modeling library—another Stanford University project. According to Nvidia, which blogged about this release, the new client is "the first Folding@home GPU client to achieve more than 1 microsecond per day performance."

Nvidia also stresses that it worked closely with the Folding@Home team to "jointly craft an efficient client tuned to the Fermi architecture." Separately, Pande notes that his team is "actively pushing ATI support," although they have no time table for the release of a third-gen GPU client tuned for the latest Radeons.

Download links for the new GPU client and instructions can be found here in Pande’s forum post. You’ll want to grab the latest drivers from Nvidia’s website, as well. And while you’re at it, you might as well join team 2630 to fold for TR, if you’re not already doing so.

Comments closed
    • Shining Arcanine
    • 9 years ago

    More than 1 microsecond per day performance in what? You can simulate a small protein that only has a dozen or so amino acids and you are likely to get far more than 1 microsecond per day performance from a Pentium 4. If you simulate something like thousands of amino acids, then 1 microsecond per day performance becomes extremely impressive.

    • bLaNG
    • 9 years ago

    how many ppd do you get from one of these puppies?

    • bLaNG
    • 9 years ago

    double post – plz delete.

    • Skrying
    • 9 years ago

    I don’t get this. What is making improvements for AMD GPUs so difficult for Stanford? Given that the number of HD5xx0 cards is massively greater than Fermi based cards I don’t see why they would spend the time unless it was significantly easier to achieve this tweak.

      • Farting Bob
      • 9 years ago

      Because NV have been working with them to improve the client for years while as far as i know ATI have not. And no matter how much they tweak an ATI version it would not be as good as the fermi because fermi dedicated far more of its chip to GPGPU stuff, so its the obvious choice for people who want to waste £400 and then double their electricity bill just to get more points a day (because lets face it, very few run it just for the good feeling of possibly helping anything, its all about the points).

        • Shining Arcanine
        • 9 years ago

        Exactly.

    • YeuEmMaiMai
    • 9 years ago

    company is full of bs when it comes to working with ATi lol fermi is a few months old and it has a client and 5xxx series is 9+months old. those loosers should drop dead……

      • grantmeaname
      • 9 years ago

      by company, can I assume you mean “Stanford”?

    • dpaus
    • 9 years ago

    Makes sense; there’s such a massive number of them out there in the field (unlike those so-scarce-they’re-almost-extinct 5000-series Radeons)

    • Erebos
    • 9 years ago

    Unless electricity becomes free (or photovoltaic panels affordable), folding is a luxury.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 9 years ago

      So is a computer. Not sure the point you’re trying to make.

        • BooTs
        • 9 years ago

        It would be very difficult to make the argument that PCs are a luxury and not a necessity. How one uses PCs can be divided in to luxury activities and necessity activities. The PCs that run Hospitals are not really a luxury. Playing games is clearly a luxury.
        Depending on your own point of view Folding would be either a luxury or necessity – but definately close to the dividing line .

          • Shining Arcanine
          • 9 years ago

          Having your own computer is a luxury. The same goes with owning a car.

          People today seem to take these things for granted, but there are many people in other parts of the world that would love to have these things.

          Also, at my university, professors cannot require that you have your own computers to take their classes, even for computer science classes that involve programming.

      • IntelMole
      • 9 years ago

      Giving money to charity is a luxury. I also don’t quite understand the point you’re trying to make.

      • farmpuma
      • 9 years ago

      For me it’s an investment in my children’s future. If folding can spare them from the alzheimer’s that took my father and which I will almost certainly face in the next ten or twenty years, it will be worth it.

      And yes, it’s a shame that AMD/ATI doesn’t provide better support for the project. –edit– Particularly in light of my past and continuing support for their hardware.

    • liquidsquid
    • 9 years ago

    As soon as nVidia can assert that folding on their consumer-based cards *doesn’t* significantly shorten their lifespan, let me know.

    • derFunkenstein
    • 9 years ago

    BUT CAN IT FO–oh. I see it can. Carry on.

    • can-a-tuna
    • 9 years ago

    “they have no time table for the release of a third-gen GPU client tuned for the latest Radeons”

    Rrrriight. Money talks, bs walks.

    • poulpy
    • 9 years ago

    q[

    • BooTs
    • 9 years ago

    l[

    • adisor19
    • 9 years ago

    Been a while since i’ve seen folding mentioned on the front page of TR.. hope to see more of this in the future.

    Adi

    • Flying Fox
    • 9 years ago

    Nice to see a Folding-related post, with a plug for team 2630 too!

    Revival of the Folding update? 😉

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