Radeon shares graphics card with Killer NIC

Bigfoot Networks and TUL have collaborated to produce a unique networking/graphics hybrid. The prototype on display at Computex combines a Killer 2100 NIC with a Radeon 5000-series GPU on the same PCI Express x16 card. There’s no word on which 5000-series GPU is being used, though. Pricing hasn’t been confirmed, either, although the combo card will reportedly cost less than buying its graphics and networking components separately.

Given the lack of details, the card’s arrival on the markt probably isn’t imminent. I suspect the two parties are using Computex to gauge interest in the dual-slot hybrid, which features a Gigabit Ethernet jack alongside dual DVI ports and an HDMI output. A small-form-factor gaming rig with a limited number of expansion slots might be a good candidate for such a product. However, I can’t think of why users would otherwise want to complicate future upgrades by having their NIC sitting on their graphics card.

Comments closed
    • AMDguy
    • 10 years ago

    In a multicore world, I’m not sure the Killer NIC has much value.

    If it does, then a better place for the Killer NIC would be on a premium gamer’s motherboard.

      • Arrakiv
      • 10 years ago

      Well, the way networking works, it all is handled on core 0 anyway, so a multicore machine doesn’t help quite as much as you might think. Also, there is the inefficient networking stack and other problems Windows has with networking, and general inability to prioritize packets from games over other things, etc…

      But, I don’t disagree that the NIC on a motherboard would be fantastic. I actually am the community manager for Bigfoot Networks, and while I’m not deep into our R&D/Engineering/etc… I do know that our CEO just revealed at Computex that we are looking at motherboard integration for the future.

        • Meadows
        • 10 years ago

        Failure. You’re ignorant about NIC RSS.

    • pogsnet
    • 10 years ago
      • Arrakiv
      • 10 years ago

      NICs do lack in innovation, indeed. That is a big reason why we’re focusing on them now, too.

      However, it surprises me that there actually isn’t more being done in networking to innovate from other companies as well. With the way that the Internet has become a key cornerstone to modern society these days, further advancements in networking seem like they should be… well, more common. For example, it isn’t just gaming that can benefit. While we focus our messaging on gaming primarily right now, it is largely because it is the biggest form of realtime applications running through the web, and gamers tend to be more ahead of the curve with technology (kind of like why early smart phones were targeted a businesses). Yet, there are also great gains to be made with other sorts of real time applications as well. Streaming video, VoIP, Video Chat, etc… These are just the beginnings of what sorts of technologies we will be seeing in the future that will be running in real time via the web, where latency will matter.

    • Chrispy_
    • 10 years ago

    l[<"However, I can't think of why users would otherwise want to complicate future upgrades by having their NIC sitting on their graphics card."<]l Who in their right mind decided that pairing the fastest and slowest-evolving hardware into one board was a good idea? I bought an intel GigE adapter when my motherboard only had 100MBit and still use it now. However, the X800 Pro I had at the time was replaced by a 6800GT, X1800XT, 8800GTS, 9800GTX+, and now a 5850.

    • l33t-g4m3r
    • 10 years ago

    Ati’s version of Physx.

      • Meadows
      • 10 years ago

      A NIC is not closed proprietary.

    • Shining Arcanine
    • 10 years ago

    If someone finds an application where Evergreen’s GPGPU capabilities are good, then it could be possible to build a cluster out of them with a very unique geometry as a consequence of being able to have both a GPU and a NIC on each PCI Express slot.

      • mboza
      • 10 years ago

      If the GPU can talk directly to the NIC. If it all goes has to go out on PCIe anyway then it is much less useful

    • SomeOtherGeek
    • 10 years ago

    Um, the appeal might be there if the graphics card is in the higher end. With gamers getting multi-GPUs, having one card that has this built in NIC might be nice as room on the MB would be scarce.

    • swaaye
    • 10 years ago

    So we have here a video card + sound card (HDMI audio) + NIC. It reminds me of the sound cards w/ modems from yesteryear.

    Except today mobos frequently have all of that built-in.

    Baffling. 🙂

    • BKA
    • 10 years ago

    Meant as a reply to #4.

    • clone
    • 10 years ago

    they had best mix them properly or they will fail in every way.

    historically when this silly practice is tried it winds up that a Killer Nic will be mated to an HD 3650 and then both Tul and Bigfoot are shocked to see nobody wanted to spend $250.00 on it….. .hehe

    if it’s an enthusiast part that had best be a Killer Nic and an HD 5870 1024mb or 5850 1024mb and the price had likely better be no more than $40 higher than the GPU cards usual price while not affecting it’s performance in any particular way.

    • bcronce
    • 10 years ago

    unless you’re really taking advantage of the onboard OS of the Killer NIC, you’re better off getting a server grade Intel NIC for the same or lesser price. Better support and typically better performance.

    • PcItalian
    • 10 years ago

    I could see this doing good if they put a low end 5000 series on a PCIe 4x slot or something similar so you can still upgrade the PCIe x16 slot and have a semi crossfire config with a powerful nic. But on the PCIe x16 slot? Your taking away from actual processing power and upgrades.

      • sweatshopking
      • 10 years ago

      good is an adjective. i think you mean “i see this doing well”, as well is an adverb modifying the verb “doing”

        • axeman
        • 10 years ago

        good point

          • LaChupacabra
          • 10 years ago

          Well put.

      • OneArmedScissor
      • 10 years ago

      I’m lost. If it’s on a 16x graphics card, it’s saving a slot and just using spare bandwidth, which there ought to be plenty of.

      If it’s on a 4x graphics card that’s in crossfire with a more powerful one, it’s not saving a slot at all, and then you’d be combining a card with plenty of bandwidth with one that has hardly any.

    • Meadows
    • 10 years ago

    This card is not useless, but it might not attract enough purchases regardless.

    On the one hand, it’s obvious that it appeals to the “very, very gaming crowd” who are anal about such things as airflow, replacement components for motherboard devices (including the NIC), overall power usage, and just plain good deals.

    On the other hand, the same exact crowd might be worried how two chips fare on the PCB (and indeed, the interface itself) and whether it adds any latency to the graphical workloads that also flow about that one slot – furthermore, whether it makes the videocard warmer, or the other way around, whether a hot videocard can actually kill the NIC.

    g{

      • DrCR
      • 10 years ago

      Um…that would probably define a lot of non-very-very-gamer geeks too. Myself included. Fellow SPCR geeks score on 3of4 right off.
      l[

        • Meadows
        • 10 years ago

        In that case, go get one.

    • kamikaziechameleon
    • 10 years ago

    sorry about the double post

      • Scrotos
      • 10 years ago

      I forgive you!

    • kamikaziechameleon
    • 10 years ago

    I’m really tired of trolls on here bringing down enthusiast gamers/tuners. Just because you don’t do it anymore doesn’t mean you have to trash it.

    Learn some manners.

    that being said this does look rather useless for such a crowd considering they don’t tend to keep a GPU longer than 3 years while such a network card would stick around substantially longer.

      • BKA
      • 10 years ago

      I noticed that lately too, maybe a lot of long time readers are getting older, have families or just lost interest. Its my profession so I welcome new products but to each his own.

    • Duck
    • 10 years ago

    All that is needed now is some Fatat1ty branding…

      • brute
      • 10 years ago

      Hopefully they’re working with Asus to create the Fatal1ty 1337 Extreme Graphic card/NIC from the republic of gam3rs

        • Duck
        • 10 years ago

        I lol’d

    • Krogoth
    • 10 years ago

    Bigfoot, just go away.

    Your attempts at catering to the dwindling enthusiast gaming crowd has failed.

    Leave the performance-grade NICs to the enterprise crowd.

      • SHOES
      • 10 years ago

      bah go virtualize something.

        • Krogoth
        • 10 years ago

        It is the unfortunate reality.

        Customer-grade NICs are more than sufficient to handle non-professional workloads. Games aren’t pushing around GiBs worth of data on a constant basis with fancy QoS on top of it.

        Latency depends mostly on physics and your ISP’s connection. Getting some fancy, overpriced NIC isn’t going to help you.

      • donkeycrock
      • 10 years ago

      how do you think video cards got so good, square one. plus the company employs alot of people.

      just to get my terminology right, is Bigfoot a flame war here or is Krogoth just a troll. Let me know…

        • MadManOriginal
        • 10 years ago

        Both.

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