Enermax, Seasonic show unique 80 Plus Gold PSUs

COMPUTEX — Power supplies with 80 Plus Gold certification abounded at Computex this week, but some units stood out more than others. Two new introductions in particular caught our eye: Enermax’s 87++ and Seasonic’s X-Series Fanless series.

The Enermax 87++ family will include 1,100W, 1,300W, and 1,500W models, all of which will surpass the official 80 Plus Gold standard. That standard mandates efficiency of 90% at a 50% load and 87% at 20% and 100% loads. However, Enermax told us 87++ units can reach 91-92% efficiency at a 50% load when connected to a 115V outlet. Folks in Europe and other areas with 230V power should be able to enjoy up to 93% efficiency.

87++ PSUs will include magnetic Twister Bearing fans, too, which can hit lower rotational speeds than traditional ball- or sleeve-bearing fans with much less friction.

Look for Enermax’s 87++ power supplies in stores some time in the fourth quarter of this year. The firm didn’t quote pricing, but considering the efficiency numbers and rather high wattages, these puppies probably won’t be cheap.

Moving on, Seasonic showed us its new X-Series Fanless line, which couples 80 Plus Gold certification with an entirely fanless design and modular cabling. Seasonic has traded fans for a very open, meshed design that should enable airflow from within the PC to dissipate what little heat the internal components produce.

Seasonic will have 400W and 460W X-Series Fanless products in stores between the end of June and August. The 460W model should set you back $160.

Comments closed
    • thermistor
    • 10 years ago

    #7…The only thing I don’t like about modular is losing the dang cables, but I guess that’s my own fault.

    • Sunburn74
    • 10 years ago

    More fanless PSUs please.

      • NeelyCam
      • 10 years ago

      ^ This. +5

      • OneArmedScissor
      • 10 years ago

      With those ginormous 140mm-ish fans, as long as they spin slow, I figure it may as well be there as a safety precaution, just in case it does get hot.

      At 300w, 10% of power being wasted as heat would still be 30w. That’s quite a bit to just allow to sit there and build up.

      Case fans may help dissipate it, but the issue I see is that people so concerned with silence that they want no fan in the PSU at all would probably not have too much going on in the case fan department.

        • StandardGeek
        • 10 years ago

        I agree. I don’t think that I could build something with adequate performance with only passive cooling, and if I have to use active cooling, it might as well pass through the power supply.

        • Kaleid
        • 10 years ago

        Fully agree. 30w is too much to leave in there and also there will often in many cases be other heat sources which would make it more than 30w.

    • wira020
    • 10 years ago

    More and more 80plus gold psus now.. i think that’s great, shouldnt be long until these more efficient psus become mainstream… and non modular psus should just die… there’s almost no price differences nowadays when looking at 500W and above…

    • NeelyCam
    • 10 years ago

    >1000W “efficient” PSUs?!! Enermax is f*cking stupid.

    Seasonic looks good, though. I wonder how efficient it is at 25W…

      • yes
      • 10 years ago

      So around 500w its most efficient. Whats bad about that?

        • Farting Bob
        • 10 years ago

        Well unless your running high end SLI/xfire setups, its damn near impossible to ever reach 500w under real life loads. Still, some people do have multiple fermi cards and they are likely to buy 1000w+ PSU’s. Not that they’ll overly care about power efficiency, the power hungry, loud GPU’s make it basically irrelevant.

        For normal (single GPU, few HDD’s and dual/quad core) you want optimal efficiency to be between 80-150w as that is where PC’s spend most of their time.

      • OneArmedScissor
      • 10 years ago

      Eh, NeelyCam, if your computer can run off 25w, why does it need more than a power brick? I think it’s tough to do better than a cheap power brick with a $160, overkill PSU. :p

      I suppose that could be a reality when all CPUs have integrated GPUs and can shut off graphics cards to use them in most cases, but we’re not /[

        • Farting Bob
        • 10 years ago

        You can get decent performing PC’s that use less than 50w when idling/doing light work. If you dont game and just use an IGP then 25w isnt far off the mark. Of course, then youd be stupid to get a high wattage, expensive PSU. But then there isnt many options for sub 300w, high efficiency units.

        • NeelyCam
        • 10 years ago

        That’s what I have: picoPSU and a power brick. But the overall efficiency of that combo is somewhere around 80%. And it’s a pricey proposition.

        I would much rather have Seasonic make a fanless 80+ Gold PSU rated at 250W, preferably in a small form factor.

          • OneArmedScissor
          • 10 years ago

          I hear you. Most 12v power bricks no longer make a marked difference compared to the best ATX PSUs, even if they’re a bit overpowered, but I wouldn’t get my hopes up. History says the manufacturers don’t care to push them. They’re more interested in focusing their smaller scale endeavors on overpowered PSUs as an attention grabber (see above *face palm*), and it’s been that way for quite a while.

          Since Pico PSUs are 12v only, it limits choices of power bricks, but there are a handful of 90% efficient 12v bricks with power handling suited to a low power desktop. I’m actually getting one, along with a different type of DC-DC adapter thinger that works with other bricks, and I’ll tell you how it goes.

          • jalyst
          • 10 years ago

          I so want someting like this…
          I’d be prepared to go up to a higher wattage to get it, ideally no more than 500w.

          This is my config, any thoughts/advice?
          §[<http://www.jonnyguru.com/forums/showthread.php?p=63258#post63258<]§

            • jalyst
            • 10 years ago

            anyone? thank-you!

    • MadManOriginal
    • 10 years ago

    Those Seasonics are priiicey but it’s great to see someone releasing usefully sized PSUs with new high efficiency tech. (I know they are pricey partly because of the passive design, those are usually more expensive.) Hopefully they can do something similar with an actively cooled design for a more normal price.

      • OneArmedScissor
      • 10 years ago

      They already did, and so did Enermax. None of their lower power gold rated PSUs ever showed up in stores. They’ve pulled this before. I’ll keep holding my breath.

        • MadManOriginal
        • 10 years ago

        Not showing up in stores means they might as well not exist so they’re meaningless. Counting ones that you can just find on 80+.org and not even on the manufacturer website don’t really mean much either so I won’t hold those against them.

          • OneArmedScissor
          • 10 years ago

          They’ve even had sites review them. They were certainly spamming them all over the news, just like this.

          Point being that I think these sorts of “announcements” fall under marketing hype until one actually goes on sale, even for the 87++s. Hexus was told they weren’t even sure if they were going to sell them.

            • MadManOriginal
            • 10 years ago

            Linkage to specific models, reviews, and proof they were never for sale or I’m calling shenanigans…or just typical OneArmedScissor always being rightness maybe 😉

            If part of the review is that they might never be for sale it’s pretty silly to be surprised or upset when they don’t go on sale.

            • OneArmedScissor
            • 10 years ago

            Oh, I’m not surprised. It’s just that judging by the last two years of what “high efficiency” PSUs have brought to the table, it parallels other enthusiast-geared marketing stunts, such as graphics cards companies spamming $500+ GTX 295s in the news, but selling them at a loss, even after they were redesigned to lower the cost.

            It looks as if they’re still so inherently expensive to make that they can really only sell them to people already shelling out for very high power handling models.

            Here’s some recent proof, but check out the price tag they had in mind:

            §[<http://www.silentpcreview.com/Enermax_Modu87_500W<]§ I specifically remember many websites reporting that Seasonic had announced lower power models along with their first gold rated PSUs, but they never went on sale. They have an official announcement up on their site, from almost two years ago: §[<http://www.seasonic.com/new/twevent20081205.htm<]§ Years later, nobody seems to have figured out a cost effective way to pull off anything beyond the bronze rating at common power levels. Both silver and gold rated PSUs have been permanently stuck at about $140+. That 460w Seasonic is likely months away, but when they're already saying it will be $160, no different from the past, but outrageously disproportionate compared to earlier passive 400w models, it's tough for me to call that progress.

      • Meadows
      • 10 years ago

      Does a fanless design encourage or discourage accumulation of dust though? Besides movement of heat, that’s my primary worry.

        • jpostel
        • 10 years ago

        I don’t know. I never really see dust on the PS of my systems, and all mine have fans. I always see it on the intake vents on the sides or bottoms of the case.

        • MadManOriginal
        • 10 years ago

        Probably no more or less than any other area in a system that has a fan on or near it and it depends upon the system and environment. I’d say that obviously a fanless design will have less dust after years of use than one with a fan in general. Personally I am very careful to use air filters on all major openings and seal up the little ones so my systems tend to have little dust. I don’t see the huge benefit of a fanless PSU or system when you can get near-silent fans anyway…relying purely and entirely upon convection never sat well with me.

          • smilingcrow
          • 10 years ago

          “I don’t see the huge benefit of a fanless PSU or system when you can get near-silent fans anyway.”

          Some people aim for more than near silent so having a fanless P/S takes that out of the loop. I had a quiet Seasonic S12 but after a few years the fan started to become more noticeable. I didn’t have that problem with the Silverstone fanless unit that replaced it.

          “relying purely and entirely upon convection never sat well with me.”

          Some people seem interested in going fanless just for the sake of it. With the right approach you can build a high power system using 3 or 4 fans and not hear any of them. Fans can get louder over time but they are easy and cheap to replace unless you have one in a P/S which is not so trivial and can invalidate a warranty.

            • MadManOriginal
            • 10 years ago

            I never said I thought it was impossible or completely without a reason, just that the benefit is minor and that relying purely upon convection cooling may not be smart – the implication being that in the longer term (or even not so longer-term) heat kills electronics. Btw buying cheap fans is probably the reason they end up being replaced often 😉

      • wira020
      • 10 years ago

      I think thats a good price considering its’ feature… 80plus gold, passive, modular, small ( probably light too) but i think this is normal for such low wattage…

        • continuum
        • 10 years ago

        Indeed. I want an X-650 for myself though, the fan cooling might be useful here– saves me money on A/C on marginal days…

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This