Thin CULV Core i5 laptop spotted in MSI booth

COMPUTEX — Only a week after seeing Intel announce its 32-nm Consumer Ultra-Low Voltage processors, we were able to get up close to a laptop with one of those CPUs in it. The 13-inch X-Slim X360 in MSI’s Computex booth had one of the CULV Core i5 processors, a sub-1" profile, and purported battery life of up to 10 hours.

In true CULV tradition, the system looks sleek and feels both light and cool to the touch. Core i5 goodness in that kind of form factor will come at a price, though: we were told around $899 to $999. Luckily, MSI plans to offer different configurations of the X360 with CULV Core i3 chips and perhaps lighter specs, which should help keep the starting price somewhat reasonable.

In addition to the 13.3" X-Slim X360, MSI will have 14" and 16" systems based on the same 32-nm CULV processors. The 16" variant will have an optical drive, too—a rare feature among consumer ultraportables, even larger ones these days.

Comments closed
    • Xenolith
    • 10 years ago

    What about the GPU?

    Is 16″ still an ultraportable? I suspect it weighs over 5 lbs.

      • axeman
      • 10 years ago

      Yeah, when I read that I thought that didn’t compute, either.

    • Jambe
    • 10 years ago

    Heck, I’d be more than content with an i3 variant of this for everyday totin’-around. I’m glad the next generation of CULV stuff is shaping up well, at least.

    • SomeOtherGeek
    • 10 years ago

    I would not mind the price. Apple is still more expensive, so…

    • Faiakes
    • 10 years ago

    Ouch!

    I’m in the market for one but I was hoping they’d be cheaper than that.

      • ludi
      • 10 years ago

      Acer Timeline. 3810TX or 1810TZ, keyboard is a little soft but there’s nothing else to complain about (especially the price).

        • Faiakes
        • 10 years ago

        Nah. I want the max battery time I can get.

        If I’m not mistaken, these more efficient i5/7 is the way to go.

          • OneArmedScissor
          • 10 years ago

          That remains to be seen.

          More efficient =! less power used overall. It just means more work done at a given power use, but that’s not really how laptops work.

          Laptops spend a very large amount of time idling, as in doing no work at all. Work load efficiency is just about irrelevant. Core iX laptops don’t inherently idle at a lower level than what stripped down Core 2 CULV laptops manage.

          The standard Core iXs haven’t really shown any sort of advantage and some of them have abysmal battery life.

          Don’t buy into the marketing hype without seeing the proof.

            • MadManOriginal
            • 10 years ago

            So when reviews come out and show that they get more battery life in ‘web browsing’ or whatever tests will you finally shush with your incorrect ideas about power usage and battery life? Getting to idle faster (ie: doing more work under any kind of load, heavy or light, with the same or less battery power) directly results in more battery life.

            CPUs these days might sit purely at idle if you’re staring at the desktop. (Eventually an OS backgroiund task will use the CPU though.) Even moving windows around can use some CPU cycles, let alone scrolling, web browsing, and doing office tasks. They aren’t ‘high powered’ uses but they do use the CPU and the faster you can get to idle the better battery life you get.

            • Faiakes
            • 10 years ago

            Well, I would think that the new i520UM is more efficient than a SU7300 stuck at 1.3GHz all the time.

            • OneArmedScissor
            • 10 years ago

            What is incorrect? Just look at the bazillion reviews of Core iX laptops. They have a laundry list of alleged technological advantages, but it never seems to show. They are directly comparable to similar Core 2 laptops:

            §[<http://www.anandtech.com/show/2902/4<]§ Compare that to what a CPU locked into idle accomplishes: §[<http://www.anandtech.com/show/2932/7<]§ On a laptop, the easiest way to get to the idle state faster is to just stay put at it, as the Core 2 CULVs do. Why go any faster when the 1 GHz range isn't a deterrent? Some of the Core iX CULVs have whacky turbo schemes where the clock speed nearly doubles. The Celeron and Pentium versions don't and will probably make more sense, but those never seem to be too prevalent, unfortunately. In general laptop use, you're not waiting on the CPU, you're waiting on external input. "Fast enough" is all it takes. In your example of dragging a window, it's done the instant you let go of the mouse. It's the same deal with loading a program from the hard drive, or a page from the internets. The CPU is waiting on something else that's much slower. For the record, I think you're making a lot of assumptions about laptop Core iXs finishing things and going into idle faster. §[<http://www.anandtech.com/show/2901/2<]§ There isn't really an architectural advantage as far as randomly moving little bits of information around goes. They have an additional, slow, L3 cache that pretty much just gets in the way, and the memory controller is still in a separate chip with the GPU, much like a northbridge. If they get more battery life, awesome. Everyone sure makes up a lot of mumbo jumbo about the existing Core iXs, though, and the proof is right there in the pudding that it's completely unfounded.

            • Faiakes
            • 10 years ago

            Hmmmmm, I’d like to believe what you’re saying given that SU7300 laptops are considerably cheaper.

            To be accurate though, I’d need to see an SUxxxx to i5UMxxx comparison.

            The i520M part in Anandtech’s article is a 35W CPU, which is fairly close to conventional CPU consumption.

    • Meadows
    • 10 years ago

    I’m curious about the quality of the hinges. Can it fold?

      • SomeOtherGeek
      • 10 years ago

      Haha! Very funny cuz I see what you did there.

      • grantmeaname
      • 10 years ago

      Meadows is on point.

      • ludi
      • 10 years ago

      Yes, and also sort, but ironing will cost you an extra $1.10 per garment.

        • Meadows
        • 10 years ago

        Where do you insert the coins?

          • NeelyCam
          • 10 years ago

          You can see the slot in the picture.

    • jpostel
    • 10 years ago

    I dig on this. The i5 is pretty powerful for like 90% of laptop users (non-gamers).

    I know they try to do the market segmentation thing, but many users could get by with a 2-core Atom and ION. There don’t seem to be any laptop makers that will make a 13-17 inch Atom lappy.

      • Spotpuff
      • 10 years ago

      I don’t think the i5 is what’s holding back laptop gaming.

    • NeelyCam
    • 10 years ago

    Purty.

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