Fallout: New Vegas will use Steam for copy protection

The people at Bethesda Softworks and Obsidian Entertainment aren’t sitting around twiddling their thumbs. Four months after announcing Fallout: New Vegas, the latest game in the Fallout series, Bethesda has started talking about the copy protection it’s going to use.

According to a fan interview with Bethesda Senior Producer Jason Bergman, New Vegas will use Valve Software’s Steamworks scheme—not just for digital rights management, but for other functionality, as well:

Fallout: New Vegas uses Steamworks for achievements and other features (such as friends lists, cloud storage of user preferences and so on). Use of Steam will be mandatory at retail. So what does that mean? We’ve implemented Steamworks in as light and unobtrusive a way as possible. Yes, you will have to install Steam when you install Fallout: New Vegas if you don’t already have it. And yes, you will have to be online at the time of that initial install. However you can install the game on as many systems as you want (with no restrictions!), and you do not have to be online to play the game after your initial activation. Not only that, but once the game has activated on Steam, you can throw out the game DVD entirely and just download the game over Steam. If you don’t even have a DVD drive, you can just take the CD-Key from the box, enter it into Steam, and download it without ever using the disc at all.

Bergman adds that, after reviewing different copy protection schemes, Obsidian concluded that Steam provided the "best, least intrusive experience" on the PC. Last we heard, New Vegas was on track to ship for the PC, Xbox 360, and PlayStation 3 this fall. (Thanks to Shacknews for the tip.)

Comments closed
    • hans
    • 10 years ago

    I’ll gladly take this over Ubisoft’s junk. I’d like to urinate in the coffee of that creator.

    • Silus
    • 10 years ago

    From almost no DRM, to Steam…Way to go Bethesda..You were one of the few that resisted using crappy DRM in your games, but now you’ve joined almost everyone else…

    • satsuper
    • 10 years ago

    Steam is like the perfect DRM for publishers, reduces second hand sales and people actually want to use Steam compared your Securom/Ubisoft DRM.

    • The Dark One
    • 10 years ago

    Used games suck and I never bought them before things like one-shot CD Keys and digital distribution came along. If a game is going for more than I want to pay, I’ll wait for a sale, instead of lining the pockets of a company like Gamestop.

    And kilkennycat, your argument is completely bogus. I would /[

    • l33t-g4m3r
    • 10 years ago

    Can you resell the game?
    Then no, steam isn’t the best copy-protection.

      • kilkennycat
      • 10 years ago

      l[

    • bcronce
    • 10 years ago

    Steam is awesome.It’s the perfect balance. I gain more than I lose. If you don’t like Steam features, you are one of those people who complain about something no matter what.

    • Ardrid
    • 10 years ago

    And that’s the way you implement a consumer friendly DRM scheme. Unobtrusive, unlimited installations, no physical media required…thank God for Steam.

    • kamikaziechameleon
    • 10 years ago

    steam DRM is the best DRM with amazing community tools built in. THANK YOU GOD!

    Steam is a amazing compromize where the consumer and dev/publisher get what they want.

    • Peffse
    • 10 years ago

    Well… it’s still DRM. But as far as DRM goes, Steam’s not too bad. Doesn’t punish the paying customer too much and gives nice features.

    • d0g_p00p
    • 10 years ago

    I am all for Steam being the DRM for the New fallout game instead of some wonko DRM that either breaks your system or causing the disk to become useless at some point.

    What kills me is this is listed as a feature and they (Bethesda) seem really excited about this:

    “you can install the game on as many systems as you want (with no restrictions!)”

    Well gee, thanks I guess. I remember when even with copy protection installed I could install my game that I purchased on as many systems as I wanted.

    I would really like to strangle the person or company that started limiting how many times you could install a game. It’s funny I look at my game collection (in 200 disk binders) and all disks from the 90’s are original retail disks. The 2000 binder are a mix of retail and burned “backups” and my current binder starting from about 2008 is the retail disk and the cracked version.

    Currently when I purchase a game now I never install the retail disk and always use a pirated version. I don’t want to deal with activation limits, wonky install schemes and the likes that come now with current games.

    Looking at my game collection starting from the 90’s It’s sad to see how the progression of CP/DRM has changed my buying habits and the progression of simple schemes to huge epic failures. There have been several big titles that I did not end up buying because of the horrible and broken DRM implemented.

      • indeego
      • 10 years ago

      /[<"I would really like to strangle the person or company that started limiting how many times you could install a game."<]/ It started in the EULA's of shrink-wrap software decades ago. You probably were just breaking the silly license agreements you agreed to when you unwrapped itg{<.<}g

      • LovermanOwens
      • 10 years ago

      Things change over time. Get used to it. People want to be paid for what they work on that some people simply take for granted. Get over it.

        • kamikaziechameleon
        • 10 years ago

        I agree with dog, pirated games have become the better product. Something is just wrong with that fact. Imagine if every industry treated you like a criminal.

        Getting a cavity search to see a movie because your fly set off the metal detector.

        Having ford steal your car because you loned it to your friend jimmy for a weekend.

        Having MGM send a muscle man to demolish your DVD collection because you had a movie night, and projected the Lord of the rings Trillogy on your garage door.

        Etc.

        This $H!T is ridiculous. What ever happened to consumer rights!

          • PainIs4ThaWeak
          • 10 years ago

          /[

            • PetMiceRnice
            • 10 years ago

            The whole issue of DRM is the reason why I gave up on the PC as a gaming platform a couple of years ago. It wasn’t a decision that I took lightly since I’d been buying PC games since 1991, but going to the consoles turned out to not be a bad thing. I understand that developers and publishers need to protect their interests, but it’s too bad that there wasn’t a form of DRM that I feel good about on the PC. I think my newest PC game is Command & Conquer 3 – Kane’s Wrath.

            • indeego
            • 10 years ago

            Consoles are fine for getting into a game and playing.

            The issue I’ve always had with them is they are a compromise. They are ALWAYS a compromise that I find unacceptable. I feel like if I were to play a console and someone else is playing the same game on a PC, I am ALWAYS missing out on a certain aspect of the game, be it graphics, resolution, audio, expandability, user-created content/mods, etcg{<.<}g

            • PetMiceRnice
            • 10 years ago

            That’s all absolutely true, and as someone whose main gaming platform used to be the PC, I can definitely see your point. Ultimately it comes down to a personal choice, and for me I decided to go the console route rather than go with the DRM we are seeing on gaming titles for the PC.

      • PainIs4ThaWeak
      • 10 years ago

      /[<"you can install the game on as many systems as you want (with no restrictions!)"<]/ /[

    • Kaleid
    • 10 years ago

    “Fallout: New Vegas uses Steamworks for achievements and other features (such as friends lists, cloud storage of user preferences and so on)”

    All things which I have no use for. Great.

      • d0g_p00p
      • 10 years ago

      you know you have the option of never using those features, shocking I know.

        • demani
        • 10 years ago

        But then what would he complain about? I’m pretty sure he does have a use for a backup, and might want to play on a second machine at some time on a whim (i.e. when the disc isn’t handy).

        Is Steam DRM perfect? Def not- but they sure make it easy to not dislike.

      • indeego
      • 10 years ago

      You have no use for having them save your games/preferences automatically between machines? This feature alone leaves stains on the underside of my deskg{<.<}g

        • CasbahBoy
        • 10 years ago

        That is a pretty hilarious statement. I’ll have to steal that one!

        • Kaleid
        • 10 years ago

        Why would I game with different machines? And copying the save files to an USB memory is hardly difficult thing to do.

        They make something sound good so that they can put in more copy protection. It’s a single play game so I’d rather save/load things locally. It shouldn’t have a thing to do with connection online… also, they wish to make it more difficult for people to sell and buy used games.

          • SomeOtherGeek
          • 10 years ago

          Oh, you pirate games? I see.

            • Kaleid
            • 10 years ago

            Did I say that? If I pirated why would I be worried about not being able to sell them? I played through both Bioshock 1 and 2 and then sold them.
            Steam makes it harder…

          • indeego
          • 10 years ago

          I play on two machines quite regularly, (work 9% +home 90%) and one mobile machine every 3-4 weeks ~1%) . The service does exactly what I’ve been doing manually for years previousg{<.<}g

      • tanker27
      • 10 years ago

      Yet another uneducated person about Steam. I am betting there still will be someone one complain about offline mode!

        • Kaleid
        • 10 years ago

        It’s basically a lot of crap which doesn’t have anything to do with the game.

          • tanker27
          • 10 years ago

          To reiterate: You have the option of never ever using them.

            • nanoflower
            • 10 years ago

            You do not have the option of not using Steam. That’s the real problem. Everyone knows they can ignore the extra options but they are stuck with using Steam in order for the company to provide those options.

            • Kaleid
            • 10 years ago

            Exactly. I miss to old days when I did this for all games:
            1. Install using disks (sometimes a hassle since there are too many)
            2. Patch it up
            3. Install no cd-crack so that disks are no longer needed.

            Some of my installations are years old and still work without re-installs despite re-installing OS. With Steam there will be more steps, I have to have online access (most of the time accessible but one cannot always count on this), wait through quite often occurring STEAM updates games etc,

            Plus many modifications do not work all that well with steam. And with steam it is possible that my account is hacked on and someone messes it up…someone mentioned multiple accounts…sigh…just more and more one doesn’t need and want to spend time with.

            Not my picture but things like this happen:
            §[<http://i296.photobucket.com/albums/mm172/NeV2k6/Guru3D%20Posts/fallout3.jpg<]§

    • Prion
    • 10 years ago

    People will moan and complain no matter what. Props to Bethesda for their decision.

    • JrezIN
    • 10 years ago

    I hope they tell us about DLC plans soon… including pricing.

    • TurtlePerson2
    • 10 years ago

    The great thing about this is that it won’t use GFWL. The problem is that the price will never drop. Games that are Steam only don’t have the natural price drop that we PC gamers are used to seeing. Mass Effect 2 came out six months ago and it’s already being sold for $30 at various retailers, but it’s $50 on Steam.

    Because CoD:MW2 came out for Steam only, you can’t get it used so there’s no price pressure on the new copy. This will leave the new copy at $60 as long as they want it there.

    The same thing will happen with New Vegas. It will come out at $50 and stay there for a long time.

      • Voldenuit
      • 10 years ago

      Meanwhile, I picked up SupCom 2 for $10.99, Torchlight for $4.99, L4D for ~$14, Shattered Horizon for $9.99, Plants vs Zombies for $7.99, Trine for $7.99, etc etc.

      Steam sales are better than brick and mortar sales.

      • imtheunknown176
      • 10 years ago

      You can still buy it in store if you want to, according to the quote.

      • deathBOB
      • 10 years ago

      If you pay full price for a game on Steam you’re doing it wrong. Steam has great, frequent sales that consistently beat in-store prices.

        • Silus
        • 10 years ago

        Which goes to show how little you know about Steam. Or you must be from the US and assume US = the world…

        Steam prices in Europe are equal to or greater than those found in stores. So you’re paying the same amount, without the box, manuals and disc(s). What an amazing deal that is…

        I don’t think I ever saw something on Steam cheaper than what I can find at any store’s bargain bin.

      • LovermanOwens
      • 10 years ago

      Mass Effect 2 had a huge sale on steam a while ago. I guess you missed it.

      Also it is more then just Valve that determine the price and frequency of the sales. It would be good to remember that.

      • indeego
      • 10 years ago

      /[<"Games that are Steam only don't have the natural price drop that we PC gamers are used to seeing. "<]/ Steam has a *[

        • Silus
        • 10 years ago

        That’s really great. Now instead of $, try doing that with € and see how that works out for you. I can save you the trouble and tell you that doesn’t happen.

        Stop making Steam this great service with great prices, when it isn’t outside of the US. It really is getting tiresome.

          • Voldenuit
          • 10 years ago

          Stop thinking Europe is the world.

          I game in Asia and Steam gives me great prices and convenience.

            • Silus
            • 10 years ago

            If I did consider Europe “the world”, I would be dismissing the fact that Steam does have good prices in the US, which I didn’t.

            On the other hand, just like some others, you are dismissing a problem elsewhere, just because you have great prices where you live.
            I know that people only care about their problems and if they don’t have any, it’s all peachy, but at least don’t assume Steam is great everywhere.

            • Voldenuit
            • 10 years ago

            l[

            • bjm
            • 10 years ago

            Jeez, did an American steal your girlfriend?

            (And Voldenuit just owned you with his reply, lol)

            • VaultDweller
            • 10 years ago

            Prices are dandy in Canada, too. I got GTA IV for $7.50 on Steam. I can’t complain about that.

        • tanker27
        • 10 years ago

        It was mostly just the Steam client if you didnt already have it. I have to look at mine but there were very few “actual” game files on disk. When I threw the disk it did some quick install (1-2 min) and then proceeded to launch and download the “rest” from Steam.

      • TurtlePerson2
      • 10 years ago

      I think people misunderstood my comment. I’m complaining about how Steam prevents the natural fall of video game prices and you all responded by saying that Steam has great deals.

      I couldn’t agree more. I have dozens of games on Steam, but I don’t buy from Steam what I could get from eBay or Newegg for less.

      The problem is that publishers now have complete control over the selling price of a game. In the old days, when a game became less popular the publisher would either have to stop selling it or cut the price. This is because stores won’t stock a product that doesn’t sell. Most publishers chose to cut price. Now Steam can stock any game without an inventory overhead, so there’s no problem if the sales slow down for a little while.

        • indeego
        • 10 years ago

        Demand+time, as always, generally sets the price of games. Publishers will gain an entirely new round of customers on each price drop. If they don’t drop the price of their games, then they risk out on an entire set of customers and revenue stream. I don’t see how Steam has done anything but allow publishers to remove the middleman (in a sense) and control the pricing more directly. They also have tools that give them real-time sales data that wasn’t possible in Brick& Mortar stores. This is as it should be. Don’t we all want the middleman out and interact directly with our widget factoriesg{

          • TurtlePerson2
          • 10 years ago

          They eliminate the used market. The used market is what pressures game prices down.

            • BobbinThreadbare
            • 10 years ago

            On the other hand, all the money goes to the developers now.

    • Voldenuit
    • 10 years ago

    To Ubisoft:
    Maaaaaaybe~ you’ll think of me, when you are all alone.
    Maybe the one who is waiting for you, will prove untrue,
    then what will you do?

    Maybe you’ll sit and sigh, wishing that I were near
    Then maybe you’ll ask me to come back again
    And maybe I’ll say “Maybe”.

    DRM. DRM never changes.

    • Sargent Duck
    • 10 years ago

    I was a Steam hater for a while, then one day I just “switched”. In terms of DRM, it’s the less evil of them all, while actually providing some real useful functionality. I still buy all my games retail (I like box art), but being able to download to any computer I may be at? Nice. A back-up of all my games? Nice.

    Personally, I wish more games used Steam. Windows Live…now that was a joke.

    On topic for the game though, I beat Fallout 3 3 times, on average each play through 100 hours. I put a lot of time into that game…

      • TurtlePerson2
      • 10 years ago

      I played through all of the DLC and side quests and did it all in about 50 hours. What did you spend the other 50 hours on in each play through?

        • Sargent Duck
        • 10 years ago

        Every quest, every location, every special “weapon” and the challenge to get as many skill points as possible before hitting level 30 (before the cap was removed – having to find all the books while trying not to level up too quickly), exploring every cave and nook, navigating through the basement of Congress.

        My first play through was around 70, my second was quicker when I skipped a lot of the exploring. My third playthrough had about 150 hours, so I figure it averages close to 100. Maybe 90 hours is more accurate.

      • no51
      • 10 years ago

      All GFWL has done for me is somehow signed me up for the Xbox newsletter.

    • JrezIN
    • 10 years ago

    Not really happy about it, but could be a lot worse… Looks like it won’t stop me from buying it.
    (do you hear me Ubisoft?!)

      • henfactor
      • 10 years ago

      Many agree Steam ADDS to the game expirence. What could possibly make this better?

        • JrezIN
        • 10 years ago

        choice

    • bthylafh
    • 10 years ago

    No mandatory install of Games for Windows Live?

    One hopes we’ll also be able to buy DLC via Steam for this one.

      • leor
      • 10 years ago

      amen, brother!

      • PainIs4ThaWeak
      • 10 years ago

      Think you can pretty much count on that.

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