Israeli firm touts SSD endurance breakthrough

An Israeli start-up claims to have developed technology that makes solid-state drives with multi-level-cell flash as reliable as their single-level-cell siblings. According to ComputerWorld, Anobit Technologies’ Genesis SSDs have 20 times the endurance of typical consumer SSDs on the market right now—and they might not be much more expensive.

At the heart of the Genesis SSD is the Memory Signal Processor, which "boosts MLC NAND flash memory reliability through a special error-correction algorithm," the site says. Thanks to this processor, Anobit’s 200GB Genesis drive can purportedly withstand 2TB worth of writes per day for five years. The 400GB Genesis can handle twice that.

Anobit’s error-correcting algorithm might remind you of SandForce SSD controllers, which also include some special sauce to boost durability. On that topic, Forward Insights analyst Gregory Wong told ComputerWorld, "[SandForce uses] 24-bit/512-byte ECC hard coding. However, the fundamental issue is that the signal quality is declining, and Anobit’s technology helps to get a ‘cleaner’ signal."

Genesis SSDs will be available in the two aforementioned capacities, 200GB and 400GB, with Serial ATA interfaces. ComputerWorld notes that an "external bridge" can give them Serial Attached SCSI or Fibre Channel connectivity. The drives are rated for top sequential read speeds of 220MB/s and write speeds of 180MB/s. That’s not too shabby. Anobit Business Development VP Gilad Engel claims these SSDs will be "very competitive" with SLC-based enterprise offerings.

Comments closed
    • Coran Fixx
    • 9 years ago

    Would buy if it were delivered by Ziva David

    • flip-mode
    • 9 years ago

    100 GB at $1 per GB. That’s what I’m waiting for.

    • PenGun
    • 9 years ago

    I am compromised enough with Israeli involvement in Intel’s processors. I prefer to avoid supporting them at this time.

      • ybf
      • 9 years ago

      you realize that by taking that stance you are actually supporting Hamas, who are known terrorists

        • BoBzeBuilder
        • 9 years ago

        Avoiding Israeli products = supporting terrorists?

        Not supporting one side doesn’t mean supporting the other side. Maybe he doesn’t like either.

      • DrCR
      • 9 years ago

      You mean how they turned the Pentium-M into a proper successor for Intel to move to from the dying P4?

      We need a roll-eyes.

      If you think your compromised by what Israel may know about you, don’t ever look into the level of domestic spying that is the norm nowadays.

    • Farting Bob
    • 9 years ago

    The first company to offer a 128GB+ drive for less than $1/GB is going to make more money than most third world countries judging by how many of us are itching to jump on the SSD bandwagon once the price drops below the magical $1/GB line.

    • Sargent Duck
    • 9 years ago

    This company would be wise to license out the technology…Nobody (and when I say nobody I mean us, enthusiasts and the people we recommend technology to, Joe/Jane Average) are going to buy this drive from this company. But we would buy from Intel/Micron/Corsair/OCZ which has this technology licensed in it.

    And server folk will be sticking with their enterprise SLC drives.

      • UberGerbil
      • 9 years ago

      I doubt any of these drives will ever actually be produced in quantity.

      They’re a start-up. They’re trying to look as capable as possible to jack up the price on the inevitable buy-out. Licensing is a possibility as well, but that’s a slower route to a payday.

        • ybf
        • 9 years ago

        they don’t need to be bought out

        they just need to hire an operations guy who has a Foxconn operations guy’s number in his iPhone

        Foxconn will do the industrial and packaging design, flesh-out the technology, and ramp production up to millions of units/quarter, at chinese-labor prices, within months.

        SSDs have a lot of advantages, but by far the greatest is that they’re nothing special to make. Just boards, chips, and connectors. No alignment, no balancing, no cleanroom for storing box-size components or performing bolt-together level activities.

        And once a decently reliable technology standardizes the market and economizes scale on production of the memory chips, the costs will only plummet. That’s where Intel or whomever will get involved, supplying the bits and pieces, not building the retail units.

    • BiffStroganoffsky
    • 9 years ago

    Yum, special sauce. “Just give me plenty. Forget about the quality.”

    • PcItalian
    • 9 years ago

    Something to “Clean” the signal, sounds like a bottleneck.

      • ybf
      • 9 years ago

      hardware error correction happens on the fly. possibly a few picoseconds of latency at the start of a response, but no loss of bandwidth in the middle of the response. regardless, they probably meet whatever latency and bandwidth standards they’re claiming

    • Hattig
    • 9 years ago

    Great. Use the tech with really rubbish low end flash to get cheap large capacity SSDs that still last a long time.

      • OneArmedScissor
      • 9 years ago

      And then charge out the bunghole for the controller, inflating the price even higher than existing drives, *ahem* Sandforce.

      SSDs with cheap memory already have greater write endurance than anything but a relentless database load calls for.

      We need cheaper controllers.

        • UberGerbil
        • 9 years ago

        Cheaper controllers would be nice, but they wouldn’t change the price of SSDs as much as you seem to think. The controller could be free and we wouldn’t see cheap SSDs. Flash is running about $2/GB for short-term contracts — and has been all year. Add in the profit margin and that’s most of the price of your SSD. Until that changes (from a drop in demand like we had during the downturn or an increase in supply as more fabs come on line, particularly at smaller nodes) you’re not going to see much change in the price of SSDs.

          • mesyn191
          • 9 years ago

          Big flash shrink coming up at the end of the year from Intel and others. They should be able to at a minimum double capacity which will hopefully lead to large price drops as well as a nice performance boost.

          I don’t think they’ll get prices to $1/GB or under but $1.25/GB or so wouldn’t be so bad at all. That is what I’m holding off for anyways.

        • Sunburn74
        • 9 years ago

        BS.

        Most of the price of a SSD is the cost of the flash itself. I hear the controllers on the indilix drives are like 35 bucks a pop or something.

    • WillBach
    • 9 years ago

    Is this like the drive discussed in podcast 65?

    • wingless
    • 9 years ago

    Nice touch with the Biblical name.

      • Coran Fixx
      • 9 years ago

      You get some awesome speed with the Revelation drive but it eventually torches your motherboard

    • Rakhmaninov3
    • 9 years ago

    “Anobit” is the worst name ever.

      • GTVic
      • 9 years ago

      If you have nothing to say, you don’t HAVE to make a comment just because there is a comment section.

        • equivicus
        • 9 years ago

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