Internet Explorer sees renewed usage share growth

Eventually, Microsoft’s renewed efforts to curb Internet Explorer’s decline in popularity ought pay off. In fact, they may already be. IE marketing chief Ryan Gavin blogged yesterday that the web browser saw global usage share growth in June, according to figures from Net Applications. That’s good news for a browser whose usage share has been sinking steadily for several years now.

Net Applications says IE’s piece of the pie grew slightly from 59.8% in May to 60.3% in June. Over the same time period, both Firefox and Opera dropped, while Google Chrome and Safari enjoyed continued growth. Chrome has been doing particularly well, growing by 2.5 points over the past six months alone, although it’s still a relatively minor player with just a 7.2% total share.

We’re left wondering exactly why more users didn’t abandon IE last month, and Gavin offers no clue. The browser did see a short spurt of growth right around the same time last year—its share climbed from 67.8% in April to 68.1% in May and 68.3% in June—but that was right after Internet Explorer 8’s mid-March release, and IE resumed its slow death spiral shortly thereafter. Who knows? Maybe this time, everyone’s switching over to the IE9 Platform Preview.

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    • Draxo
    • 9 years ago

    “Net Applications says IE’s piece of the pie grew slightly from 59.8% in May to 60.3% in June. Over the same time period, both Firefox and Opera dropped, while Google Chrome and Safari enjoyed continued growth. Chrome has been doing particularly well, growing by 2.5 points over the past six months alone, although it’s still a relatively minor player with just a 7.2% total share.”

    might just be a coincidence, but the last net framework update causes opera to hang (run in back round and unable to start until you kill it from task manager and re start) and firefox to outright crash.

    • axeman
    • 9 years ago

    It’s said even IE6’s market share went up slightly. Someone theorized that the (slight) upturn in the economic situation just meant more people are using corporate desktops which explains IE’s rise, especially once IE6 is thrown in there.

    • WaltC
    • 9 years ago

    Yes, such statistics are so informative because as everyone knows it /[

      • cygnus1
      • 9 years ago

      agreed, i run FF and chrome everyday, and fire up IE occasionally as well

      • BenBasson
      • 9 years ago

      Even if you use a multitude of browsers, you’re still counting towards the overall percentages.

      Additionally, I think the numbers are spread out enough (over hundreds of millions of people every day) to remove such anomalies.

      I really doubt that anything approaching a significant number of people actively use more than one browser variant, regardless of how many are installed.

      • Shining Arcanine
      • 9 years ago

      I think that this is usage share, which depends on which installed browsers people actually use, rather than which browsers people have installed.

        • UberGerbil
        • 9 years ago

        Yes. Walt’s rant is based on a bad assumption (but at least it’s brief by his standards). If you have Chrome, FF, and IE installed and use them 50%, 30%, and 20% respectively (as a percentage of the total sites you visit) then these survey numbers should roughly reflect that (to the extent that you’re visiting the sampled sites). Any increase in the relative use of any browser at the expense of any other browser will show up as a shift in overall usage, even if you are also using other browsers

    • BiffStroganoffsky
    • 9 years ago

    I speculate that the Firefox and Opera drop are due to decrease use in Europe as people took their mandatory holidays and and went outside. On the other hand, I am only getting one furlough day per month for the fiscal year. My luck, it will rain on those days.

      • indeego
      • 9 years ago

      I suspect it is people are getting Windows 7 machines and too lazy to put back on their old browsersg{<.<}g

        • NeelyCam
        • 9 years ago

        ^ This

        • BiffStroganoffsky
        • 9 years ago

        I get a sense that the lazy people are generally the ones that stick with the version of IE included but the people who take the time to install FF and Opera are going to want their gadgets when they venture forth on the internet. I don’t see near enough widgets in Win7/IE8 to make that many people completely abandon the Fox or O.

          • UberGerbil
          • 9 years ago

          In the past I’ve installed first Firefox and more recently Chrome on my elderly relatives’ machines purely to limit the damage from malware. But since Windows 7 / IE8 I haven’t bothered. They don’t use any extensions, the new machines are fast enough that for the kind of browsing they do the difference in browser performance doesn’t matter, and IE is no longer the swiss cheese it once was.

          Likewise their old installations of AVG or AVAST have given way to MSE.

          (It would be interesting to see if their are spikes in browser adoption/switching around times when students are home from school — summer, Thanksgiving in the US, etc)

    • Sargent Duck
    • 9 years ago

    How do they get these results? Does each browser have an ID that monitoring software at the ISP (or between the client/host) picks up? Or do they get this from all the spy-ware on people’s computers?

    • Meadows
    • 9 years ago

    Let’s hope the open beta of IE9 is good enough that people (including me) will be convinced to try it out and even consider switching back.

    We’ll see soon enough.

      • designerfx
      • 9 years ago

      why would you want IE9 to be used? it’s another standard that doesn’t follow HTML5 properly

        • Meadows
        • 9 years ago

        1) It’s a browser, not a standard.
        2) How do you figure? You don’t even have a clue.

        • bjm
        • 9 years ago

        Which HTML5 “standard” implementation are you referring? Firefox’s version of HTML5, Safari’s, or Chrome’s? Or maybe.. Opera’s?

          • Meadows
          • 9 years ago

          The implementations work fine in all cases, it’s just the formats now – not all formats are hardware-accelerated.

      • Shining Arcanine
      • 9 years ago

      Let us not. Microsoft made Internet Explorer to kill any prospect of Netscape bringing cloud computing to us and they suceeded by delaying it for at least 20 years. Do you really want to delay things another 20 years?

        • Meadows
        • 9 years ago

        Yes. I hate the Cloud, and the web already works.

          • srg86
          • 9 years ago

          One of the few times I agree with you, but in this case I do. Let the cloud be delayed indefinitely is what I say! Would rather use desktop apps anyday.

        • MadManOriginal
        • 9 years ago

        Your point would have been much more convincing if you had written ‘M$.’

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