Details about Sandy Bridge naming begin to emerge

We were told last month that Intel’s next-gen Sandy Bridge processors will have Core in model names, much like today’s Core i3, i5, and i7 offerings. Expreview now claims to have more information about the subject; it says Intel will indeed keep the model names but add an extra digit to the model numbers.

More simply put, Expreview claims Sandy Bridge chips will be part of the Core i3-2000, Core i5-2000, and Core i7-2000 series. A hypothetical model number might be, say, Core i7-2870. Word is that the leading "2" will definitely be in the mix.

Although this rumor fits with what we were told about Core in model numbers, we’d still suggest taking it with a grain of salt—you know, since even Expreview says it doesn’t have confirmation yet. We’ll probably learn more concrete details as Sandy Bridge draws closer to release. Last we heard (also at Computex, funnily enough), Intel should have its next generation of CPUs ready for early January 2011, in time for the Consumer Electronics show.

Let’s just hope Intel does a better job of partitioning the i3, i5, and i7 series this time. The current distribution is kind of a mess, with the Core i5 family comprised of both dual- and quad-core chips, and the i7 family straddling four and six cores. Abstracting processor features to keep things simpler for consumers has its advantages, sure, but core counts tend to have a pretty strong impact on CPU performance.

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    • ronch
    • 9 years ago

    This is good news, as more advanced CPUs are always welcome. Bulldozer is also slated next year so it’s gonna be an interesting battle.

    I for one, though, will wait until 2012 or ’13 before I upgrade. As of now my Phenom II X4 925 (an unlocked X3 720) should be more than sufficient, especially since I only usually surf the Net, watch movies, and play light games. Heck, if I drop games completely this Phenom II should even last me till the aliens come.

    Higher performance CPUs, or low price OK-performance CPUs, either way we win. Just keep AMD alive.

    • ssway
    • 9 years ago

    Are these going to be 22nm, or will that not be until the next release? If so, I’m up for that as less heat and power usage is always a good thing.

      • ronch
      • 9 years ago

      Seeing as Intel released new process technologies in 2007 (45nm) and 2009 (32nm), I’d assume 2011’s refresh won’t come early enough for these chips, if these chips indeed would come out in early Jan. 2011.

    • NeelyCam
    • 9 years ago

    So, CedarMill/Yonah was “Core”, and Conroe was “Core 2”

    Then, Nehalem/Westmere was “Core iX-NNN”, and Sandy Bridge is “Core iX-2NNN”.

    Huh, this all makes sense! (NOT)

    They should call IvyBridge Core i3GS and see what happens.

    • kamikaziechameleon
    • 9 years ago

    intel really needs to consolodate their consumer sockets, honestly it is a bit ridiculous. having 4 consumer sockets on desktop alone is just about the #1 reason people move to AMD. I think we all know they can’t continue to manage 4 concurrent sockets and as such people are hesitent to build systems with their hardware and end up unsupported in the short term.

      • jpostel
      • 9 years ago

      ummmm….

      Microsoft?

        • kamikaziechameleon
        • 9 years ago

        intel!(hits head against wall)

        ^_^

        editing because i can’t live with myself.

      • Peldor
      • 9 years ago

      If you’re moving to AMD for the socket, you may well be feeling the 939 burn all over again when AMD changes sockets next year.

        • Game_boy
        • 9 years ago

        They won’t though. Bulldozer is AM3, and that’s the one you’d want to upgrade to.

        Fusion will have a different socket because of the graphics pins; can’t help that.

    • Mithent
    • 9 years ago

    This seems like a very minor naming change for what’s supposed to be one of the “tocks” in Intel’s strategy, brining in a new microarchitecture? This sort of name would have worked better for Westmere, being a closer Nehalem derivative.

      • OneArmedScissor
      • 9 years ago

      Don’t get too excited. The first iteration pretty much is what you’re saying about Nehalem to Westmere, as they didn’t really do anything useful with that shrink yet beyond the few $1,000+ 6 cores.

      On the architecural side of things, it’s looking like the emphasis is on the integrated GPU, cutting the chip size down, and hopefully, lower overall power use.

        • pedro
        • 9 years ago

        I’m definitely hoping to see much more focus on power savings than ‘performance’ on this round.

          • OneArmedScissor
          • 9 years ago

          I’m sure it will be better in some way or another, but I just hope the emphasis is actual, tangible power savings, and not phantom “increased efficiency,” which is easily fudged. Same goes for AMD. Now that they’ll have both Bobcat and Bulldozer, I could foresee each one being a complete extreme.

    • kamikaziechameleon
    • 9 years ago

    how about i7 having two different F’ing sockets

      • Game_boy
      • 9 years ago

      That’s going to carry on.

      But the first SB will only be 2- and 4-core anyway, you’ll have to wait until H2 for the high-end.

      • NeelyCam
      • 9 years ago

      How about having i5 in three different F’ing sockets.

    • bowman
    • 9 years ago

    It’s a good thing there’s nothing new around that actually requires new CPUs otherwise I might care about the naming mess.

      • Grigory
      • 9 years ago

      Surely you meant to say that there is nothing of interest to *you* that actually requires new CPUs, right?

        • OneArmedScissor
        • 9 years ago

        Eh, well, then what are you doing that requires these new CPUs? It’s going to be a very good while before they even add more cores and cache. He has a pretty valid point.

        These could be nice for laptops, but that has nothing to do with software requirements.

          • NeelyCam
          • 9 years ago

          Isn’t SandyBridge supposed to have integrated graphics that will slap AMD Fusion silly…?

            • Game_boy
            • 9 years ago

            No. Its graphics will have, according to Intel, double the performance of Clarkdale. Which would be around 80 AMD shaders worth. Llano will feature about 400 shaders.

            You’ll have to wait for Larrabee-based graphics for Intel’s to be any good, since the roadmap only has derivatives of the current graphics uarch (used in G45 and Clarkdale)

            • NeelyCam
            • 9 years ago

            So, how much better will Llano be compared to 890G? Clarkdale is roughly equal to 890G, and if SandyBridge doubles the performance, Llano would have to be more than 2x better than 890G?

            Overall, I’m starting to be concerned about integrated graphics getting unnecessarily good and just simply wasting power. If I want to play games, I get a graphics card. If I want to save power/heat/cooling/noise, I want
            /[

            • Game_boy
            • 9 years ago

            890G = 40 shaders
            Llano = 400 shaders

            So ~10x the performance. Maybe a little less due to memory bandwidth.

    • pedro
    • 9 years ago

    l[

      • wira020
      • 9 years ago

      Fortune tellers….

    • StuG
    • 9 years ago

    I’d really like a more mainstream naming scheme from them, so hopefully they bring that to the table along with good performance.

    • JustAnEngineer
    • 9 years ago

    Clarkdale (2 cores) is sold as Pentium, Core i3 and Core i5.
    Lynnfield (4 cores) is sold as Core i5 and Core i7.
    Bloomfield (4 cores) is sold as Core i7.
    Gulftown (6 cores) is sold as Core i7.

    …and that’s just in the desktop market!

      • Krogoth
      • 9 years ago

      Xeon market is pretty straightforward.

      You have SP Xeons which are either Lynnfields (LGA1156) or Gulftown/Bloomfield (LGA1366). DP Xeons are LGA1366 only. The key difference from their desktop counterparts is ECC support.

        • Game_boy
        • 9 years ago

        Sandy Bridge will have 3 server sockets though – Socket H2 for UP Server and Workstation [replacing 1366], socket B2 for DP server (new) and socket R for MP and Westmere-EX in mid-2011.

        That’s more complex than the current 1366 or Nehalem-EX system.

        There will be 2 and 4 core SB parts in 1Q ’11 and 6 and 8 core parts in H2 ’11, along with a 10-core Westmere-EX, and 32nm Atom parts replacing Celeron on the low end.

        • OneArmedScissor
        • 9 years ago

        You forgot socket 1567. There’s also at least one Clarkdale Xeon. And then there’s the mess of Bloomfield, Gainestown, and Jasper Forest. Oooook Intel…

          • Krogoth
          • 9 years ago

          LGA1536 is replacement for Socket 604 (Xeon MP platform).

          FYI, Gainestown is the DP version of Bloomfield.

      • KarateBob
      • 9 years ago

      Plus the whole mobile market, with 2 core i7’s. Sigh.

      • ronch
      • 9 years ago

      Clear as mud. What a mess.

        • UberGerbil
        • 9 years ago

        It’s not a mess at all. You want something cheap? Get i3. You want something powerful? Get i7. You want something in between? Get i5. Simple. All the rest is just nerd-angst. Ordinary people don’t care. And neither does Intel.

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