Google gives up on Wave

Ever tried Google Wave? Part Gmail spinoff, part online collaboration tool, the utility seemed to have potential—at least once you figured out how to use it. Sadly, though, Wave won’t be taking over everyone’s social networking routines; Google announced yesterday that it’s killing the project and moving on.

In a nutshell, Google blames lackluster user adoption for its decision to halt development. Google code monkeys will keep maintaining the existing service "at least through the end of the year," and they’ll provide tools so users can pull their content out. But beyond that, Wave seems to be as good as dead. Only the underlying bits and pieces will live on:

[We will] extend the technology for use in other Google projects. The central parts of the code, as well as the protocols that have driven many of Wave’s innovations, like drag-and-drop and character-by-character live typing, are already available as open source, so customers and partners can continue the innovation we began.

Maybe Wave’s complexity contributed to its undoing. I got a Wave invite a while back and hopped in, but I could never really figure out the point. Google Documents already takes care of my collaboration needs, and Gmail does a great job with my e-mail. Why do I need an extra piece of software to do mostly the same things? The UI seemed both intimidating and unintuitive, too, which didn’t help.

Comments closed
    • Bensam123
    • 9 years ago

    It’s like brainstorming online, you know what people do when they talk to eachother. I honestly don’t think it ever had a purpose beyond being ‘cool’ in the first place.

    • Vasilyfav
    • 9 years ago

    Good riddance

    • conjurer
    • 9 years ago

    As i have expected. From begining i thougt that wave is some beta version of chat that would be integrated in gmail, docs or calendar. There is no point to chat in another service, when you have mail, and google jabber server (gtalk). But integrating some of most used wave features in gtalk/gmail chat makes more sense.

    • XaiaX
    • 9 years ago

    /[

      • PeterD
      • 9 years ago

      Anyway, it were very cleaver mathematicians, you know.

    • Buzzard44
    • 9 years ago

    I used this a few times. It’s extremely useful for students working on group projects and papers. I’m mildly saddened.

    • mattthemuppet
    • 9 years ago

    tried it for a bit, found it a complete PITA to use. Given that it was a 1 to 1 project, just swapping a Word file back and forth would have been easier.

    • pantsburgh
    • 9 years ago

    I’m sad, my friends and I use this all the time for sharing project ideas, links, etc. I honestly don’t know how we’re gonna replace this; IRC, IM, and email just aren’t the same. 🙁

      • Welch
      • 9 years ago

      Why not just use google documents?……………… Its got a live chat collaboration feature, works out pretty well.

      • moog
      • 9 years ago

      Use Office 2010 online (in your bing.com account).

    • OneArmedScissor
    • 9 years ago

    Business failure…or successful experiment? It looks like they have eliminated all of the variables.

    ‘Google Me’ shameless Facebook clone: IMMINENT

    • TaBoVilla
    • 9 years ago

    I got really excited first time I heard about Google Wave, it has great features and incorporated good ideas. Would have used it more, but I felt I had no one on my Google Wave contacts to share stuff with.

    It wasn’t “slow user adoption” as they pointed out, come on google! mainstream people didn’t know this existed, only techies. Not enough people got on the bandwagon because there wasn’t enough people using Wave to share, which was one of Wave’s main sell-points: collaboration, online community, sharing, threads instead of emails, etc.

    In my personal case, when I tried to get people to use google wave they were mostly concerned about stability, LONGEVITY of the service, compatibility with email clients, etc. Things that could very well be address with a thorough marketing campaign to inform the public about google wave, try to get other big players onboard, maybe MS Outlook support, etc.

    I hope they are doing this in order to relaunch the service in the near future, probably a different name, but with enough momentum to get the ball rolling. Google, this could be the email killer. Sad.

      • PeterD
      • 9 years ago

      notfred wrote: “We decided it would be great for work collaboration especially with people teleworking. The problem is that it is hosted on Google’s servers and we need to keep commercially sensitive stuff in house.”

      Which means “normal” people shouldn’t know about it. The techies is good enough. But companies already use other stuff.
      Maybe Google didn’t realisze that software for companies is promoted in other ways than software for individuals, or that you’re talking about a different scale when it comes to amount of people using it?
      Not to mention the matter of trust.

        • poulpy
        • 9 years ago

        q[

          • PeterD
          • 9 years ago

          God isn’t that powerfull.

            • Chrispy_
            • 9 years ago

            Empirical data has so far (since the beginning of credible, controlled experimentation and records) determined that God does not exist, ergo his/her power is equal to zero and he/she would be unable to forbid anything.

        • jpostel
        • 9 years ago

        Name the “other stuff” that companies use. You have mentioned it multiple times in the comments. Do you mean email?

        There are a few functional overlaps with email and a few other collaboration tools, but I can’t think of a single product that is really comparable to wave.

        Have you actually used wave?

          • PeterD
          • 9 years ago

          Tthose appliances are not on the market.

    • burntham77
    • 9 years ago

    Considering I don’t work at home, I never had a use for it.

    • eitje
    • 9 years ago

    I could never get an invite to try it out. 🙁

    • Chrispy_
    • 9 years ago

    I had a wave invite, spent 15 minutes perusing the features and then never touched it again.

    Social networks are popular because of their almost commodity status.

    • notfred
    • 9 years ago

    I tried it out with a few friends. We decided it would be great for work collaboration especially with people teleworking. The problem is that it is hosted on Google’s servers and we need to keep commercially sensitive stuff in house.

    I think if they published everything so that we could host our own Wave servers in house then we would use it.

      • MadManOriginal
      • 9 years ago

      bbbbut then how could they datamine all your information?!?

      • PeterD
      • 9 years ago

      See: it’s about trust.

        • provoko
        • 9 years ago

        What’s not to trust? They tell you EXACTLY what they do. You can read their TOS and privacy agreement, they use plain English and not legal talk.

        In fact, google “Google wave privacy agreement”. Now try “Microsoft hotmail privacy agreement” or “visa privacy agreement” or “chase privacy agreement; get ready to read A LOT of vague sentences and complicated legal jargon.

          • OneArmedScissor
          • 9 years ago

          Yeah, and if you put it into Google Translate, it makes it even simpler:

          “BEND OVER, HERE IT COMES AGAIN!”

          • XaiaX
          • 9 years ago

          Everyone that ever rips you off tells you all about how they’re not going to rip you off.

      • provoko
      • 9 years ago

      It’s open source code, if you’re serious, your company could use it and create their own “wave” like program.

        • PeterD
        • 9 years ago

        I think most companies already have wave-like programs with their own, specialized functions, tailored to the kind of work that’s done in the company, put in intranets and extranets and whatever nets, and keeping onlookers out thanks to passwords and legacy coding.

          • StashTheVampede
          • 9 years ago

          No.

          There are VERY few kinds of applications like Wave out there. There are “project” like tools, but they aren’t really meant for the same kinds of web sharing that Wave is. I’m not a defender of Wave, but it clearly wasn’t meant for “everyone” to use — the learning curve was a bit steep.

            • PeterD
            • 9 years ago

            Wave reminds me a bit of the case with MS Outlook.
            See: I had MS Windows, and MS Outlook Express, and MS Fax, and the Address Book.
            In my opinion, the only thing MS Outlook did, was putting an extra layer betweeen MS Windows and all those other programs.
            Why would you do that?
            Moreover: it put a high stress on the pc’s resources, and it was one of the main vulnerabilities of pc’s.
            So, I never used it.
            Than, when pc’s started to be able to handle such a complex bringing together of different programs and data sources, I had quit using faxes. It’s all e-mail now. So, MS Outlook became even less interesting.

            And I can’t help but think that Wave does a bit the same thing: bringing applications together, which don’t have to be brought together.
            Instead, maybe, in some situations, in which companies have their own solutions and don’t need Wave. Or, at least, there arent companies that need Wave in suchs quanties that it’s interesting for Google. Most Google applications draw millions of users.

    • kamikaziechameleon
    • 9 years ago

    never even heard of it. that could be part of the reason for poor user adoption. Making all the features in wave seperate from its other offering I think really dilutes what it sounds like could have happened with this service.

      • sweatshopking
      • 9 years ago

      never heard of it? do you use the internet?

        • odizzido
        • 9 years ago

        I knew they were making something called wave, but I never saw anything about it from google itself. I didn’t even know people were able to use it.

        • poulpy
        • 9 years ago

        I lol’d but in all fairness you don’t seem on the ball either, my good man, as I believe it’s called “teh interweb”!!11!

        • PeterD
        • 9 years ago

        No, he doesn’t. Actually: his friend is telling him all kinds of weird stuff, and he answers, and than his friend types it in.

          • sweatshopking
          • 9 years ago

          is that directed to me? I think that most users, Meadows, jdaven, madmanoriginal, ssidbroadcast, etc. all have voted in the past that i had the most sensible posts on the site. I would take offense to that except i realize you were probably not referring to me.

            • PeterD
            • 9 years ago

            Don’t feel offended. We’re only putting forward opinions here;
            By the way: we don’t even know who you are, remember?

            • sweatshopking
            • 9 years ago

            don’t worry. I was joking. my posts are dumb.

            • MadManOriginal
            • 9 years ago

            Your posts are the most sensible because you are just here for fun and rarely if ever get mixed up in serious arguments over what is ultimately of little consequence. Your attitude is what makes me <3 you!

            -Your BFF, MadManOriginal

            • sweatshopking
            • 9 years ago

            ♥♥♥♥♥♥

    • PeterD
    • 9 years ago

    People don’t trust Google anymore as they did in the beginning.
    There gmail service, eg, is not something I would use, but lots of people didn’t see any danger in it; Back then.

      • Applecrusher
      • 9 years ago

      I dont know a single person who would not use a google service because they dont “trust” google.

      Also, if people do not trust google why are android phones flying off the shelves?

        • Corrado
        • 9 years ago

        Because other than iPhones, theres zero competition. Palm is nary a blip on the radar, WinMo6.x? riiiight. Most new RIM devices are garbage. So you can pick between an iPhone, and an Android phone if you want a smartphone. If you had the choice between a Daihatsu, a Yugo and a Pontiac Aztek, you’d probably pick the aztek… but that doesn’t make it a great car. It means its the best of the available options.

          • poulpy
          • 9 years ago

          Still blaming the failure of Wave onto “People don’t trust Google anymore” is a poor trolling attempt at best.
          There is nothing showing a lack of interest in Google searches, Google Ads or Google Mail to cite three of their biggest products.

          Wave was an interesting experiment, and certainly built upon exciting technologies but a) was a bit too powerful/complex for your average user and b) had too much overlap with the exiting emails and chat clients for people to bother switching.

            • Corrado
            • 9 years ago

            Right, Wave didn’t fail because people don’t trust Google. Wave failed because people didn’t know what the hell to do with it.

            Google is not good at social products, generally. Theres a reason they are about to launch their what? 3rd or 4th ‘Facebook killer’? They just don’t seem to ‘get’ it.

            You also can’t piss people off and mine their data forever and expect people to be OK with it.

            • travbrad
            • 9 years ago

            True, but most of the other “social sites” barely break even or even lose money, so I’m not sure how successful I’d consider them either. They are more popular, but as far as making money they don’t really succeed.

            Like everyone else, I never understood the point of Wave. It was like Google made it specifically to do all the things I never had any interest in doing.

            • provoko
            • 9 years ago

            I thought Wave was pretty cool. I’m glad it’s open source, hopefully someone does something cool with it.

        • indeego
        • 9 years ago

        I don’t trust Google, and have a Droid. The Droid is used for work, and you can use Droids without the marketplace.

        I don’t allow scripting from google domains, don’t save cookies from them, and removed my gmail account in April after doing research on the Gaia breach.

        Kinda paranoid, but I really don’t trust *[

      • YellaChicken
      • 9 years ago

      Bad Troll, bad! Get in your box!

        • PeterD
        • 9 years ago

        Now, look here: the catholic church is an institution which adherse to certain moral standards. Nevertheless, some of their priest are up in court because the fucked children in their ars.
        Okay?
        Now: Google, MS, Apple, Facebook etc etc etc don’t even have “certain moral standards”, except “greed is good”.
        Now then: what do you expect?

          • ludi
          • 9 years ago

          Serious question: Have you been drinking?

            • PeterD
            • 9 years ago

            No.
            Try “priests child abuse” in Google.

            • ludi
            • 9 years ago

            I was talking about the functional relevance of that, to anything else under discussion here.

            • PeterD
            • 9 years ago

            Well, it might have looked as if the discussion was meandering a bit, but I only wanted to react to the idea that businesses like Google etc are trustworthy as such. The example of the priests only was meant to show that one has to be very carefull to trust anybody.

          • provoko
          • 9 years ago

          WTF!? I’m sure if Google did that to kids, you could search for it on Google, haha.

      • wobbles-grogan
      • 9 years ago

      I dont see what all this hoo ha about not trusting google is. They’re a company there to make money. End of.

        • sweatshopking
        • 9 years ago

        THEY’S EVIL!! CROPERATIONS ARE BAD!! no but seriously. corporations as they currently stand, are a powerful force for inequality, and greed. Google has some privacy concerns, which are concerning, but they’re no worse than anyone else. check the list of corporations who are dling that torrent of 100 million facebook accounts. all of those companies are evil. btw, apple is there, microsoft isnt….

      • Meadows
      • 9 years ago

      g{

        • TravelMug
        • 9 years ago

        I am disappoint!!!

      • l33t-g4m3r
      • 9 years ago

      What’s not to trust? Google is partnered with the CIA/NSA, and since all gov is 100% trustworthy, we should just blindly believe in it’s data mining ethics.

      You only have to worry about being tracked, traced, and databased in real time, and now being fed into predictive analytics, if you have something to hide. ;-p

      §[<http://www.infowars.com/google-and-cia-plough-millions-into-huge-recorded-future-monitoring-project/<]§

      • provoko
      • 9 years ago

      I trust Google, they’re honest. I don’t trust PeterD, haha.

        • YellaChicken
        • 9 years ago

        Yeah, I heard he f*$!s kids in their ars (technica?)

      • Disco
      • 9 years ago

      This is a little off tangent, but with respect to trusting “good” companies… I was shocked to see what data the Valve hardware survey was collecting off of my machine. I was familiar with the surveys they post, and so when I was propositioned through Steam to submit my hardware data I clicked “OK”. I have no problem sharing my hardware information.

      3 clicks into the survey, it starts going through the hard drive and listing every piece of software installed on my computer! There is all sorts of junk in there, stuff I haven’t looked at in years. I have to ask ” Why the fuck does Valve need to know all my software?” Not that there is anything very interesting… it’s just that I find that very intrusive. And there is absolutely no reason for that data to be collected, unless it is going to be sold to someone.

      In summary, I was pretty disappointed once I saw that ‘snooping’ and I immediately cancelled the operation. So, no hardware info from me to Valve. I really like Valve and what they have done with Steam, but that crossed the line.

        • ludi
        • 9 years ago

        That info lives in your registry and can be snooped much more easily than you ever imagined.

          • Disco
          • 9 years ago

          I don’t disagree that the information is there to be snooped, but I don’t understand why Valve would make it an integral part of their ‘hardware’ survey. Like I said. It crossed the line for me, so I cancelled the process.

          • PeterD
          • 9 years ago

          There’s kind of a wrong reasoning in that.
          It’s not because the door of your house is open, that people have the right to come in and snoop around. That’s a fact.
          It’s only that the insurance company won’t be willing to pay for your losses, but people abusing the fact that the door is open, can still be brought to court and be condemned.

      • StashTheVampede
      • 9 years ago

      Are you German? Are you from Germany? Were you the one that wanted to take the source of Chrome browser and turn it into a commercial browser that was “stripped” of all Google tracking?

      • jpostel
      • 9 years ago

      What webmail service do you use? Who is worthy of your trust?

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